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[ -NINTH 
ANNUAL RiPORT 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

0'' ■■'^^^"LAND 
1965 




UNIVERSITY OF 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Maryland Roam 
J^eishy of Maryland Uh*mn 
CoiioKc Park. Mrl 



DO KOT GlfiCOLATB 



Digitized 


by the Internet Archive 






i 


in 2013 









http://archive.org/details/report00mary_90 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



NINETY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 
Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 
Year Ending June 30, 1965 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



MARYLAND DIRECTORY OF SCHOOL OFFICIALS 
October, 1964 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

NAME TERM EXPIRES 

Jerome Framptom, Jr., President Federalsburg 1971 

William L. Wilson, Vice President Cumberland 1967 

Mrs. J. Wilmer Cronin Aberdeen 1966 

William L. HufF Cavetown 1968 

Mrs. William F. Robie Forest Heights 1970 

Richard Schifter Bethesda 1969 

Edward N. Wilson Baltimore 1965 

James A. Sensenbaugh, Secretary-Treasurer 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

STATE OFFICE BUILDING 
301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 21201 

NAME OFFICE 

James A. Sensenbaugh State Superintendent of Schools 

David W. Zimmerman Deputy State Superintendent 

W. Theodore Boston Assistant State Superintendent in Certification 

and Accreditation 

Quentin L. Earhart Assistant State Superintendent in 

Administration and Finance 

Robert C. Thompson Assistant State Superintendent in 

R. Kenneth Barnes (January 1, 1965) Vocational Rehabilitation 

Wesley N. Dorn* Director of Research and Development 

Paul E. HufRngton Director of Instruction 

James L. Reid Director of Vocational Education 

Nettie B. Taylor Director of Library Extension 

Katherine L. Harris Administrative Assistant 1 

Dorothea E. Young Secretary III 

Mrs. Maria M. Bosz Secretary III 

Mrs. Rosetta D. Brightman Secretary I 

Dolores M. Falconer Secretary I 

Walter Blackwell Chauffeur II 

Division of Instruction — Paul E. Huffington, Director 

Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey Assistant Director and Supervisor of 

Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Geneva E. Flickinger Supervisor of Adult Education 

Clarence E. Baseman Supervisor of Civil Defense Adult Education 

George M. Crawford Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Mildred L. Sov^^ers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Thomas W. Pyles Supervisor of High Schools 

Lew^in A. Wheat Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Blew Supervisor of Instruction 

Thomas E. Rowan Supervisor of Mathematics 

Herbert R. Steiner Supervisor of Physical Education 

Sarah L. Leiter Supervisor of Pupil Services 

Percy V. Williams Supervisor of Pupil Services 

Elliott E. Lapin Supervisor of Special Education 

Andrew W. Mason Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Rozelle J. Miller Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Beverly S. Wozniak Secretary III 

Mrs. Beverly B. Armiger Secretary I 

Mrs. Marlene R. Barber Secretary I 

Marilyn Buckner Secretary I 

Mildred M. Faulstich Secretary I 

Sharon Hults Stenographer 

Mrs. Rena B.. Levitz Secretary I 

Mrs. Bessie S. Price Secretary I 

Mrs. Mary E. Wimmer Secretary I 

Mrs. Mary Silverman Secretary I 

Mrs. Oma K. McClung Clerk-Typist II 

* Leave of absence for one year 



2 



State Curriculum Center* 

Eleanor K. Hocker Counselor II 

Mrs. Margarett J. Smith Library Assistant 

Division of Library Extension — Nettie B. Taylor, Director 

Kenneth F. Duchac Supervisor of Public Libraries 

Stella Loeffler Supervisor of Public Libraries 

H. Thomas Walker Supervisor of Public Libraries 

Mae I. Graham Supervisor of School Libraries 

Doris L. Anderson Secretary III 

Mrs. Martha K. Merz Secretary I 

Tema M. Dinowitz Stenographer 

Division of Vocational Education — James L. Reid, Director 

Glenn W. Lewis Supervisor of Agriculture 

Dvi^ight P. Jacobus Supervisor of Educational Services to Industry 

Evelyn F. Miller Supervisor of Home Economics 

Irving W. Herrick, Jr Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Elwood F. Adams Supervisor of Manpower Training 

Raymond G. Pluemer Supervisor of Manpower Training 

Harold E. Reiley Executive Secretary, Future Farmers of 

America, Board of Education, Frederick 

Melvin H. Garner Supervisor of Trades and Industry 

Warren G. Smeltzer Supervisor of Trades and Industry 

Mrs. Mary N. Stultz Executive Secretary, Future Homemakers of 

America, Board of Education, Frederick 

Elizabeth McGinnity Secretary III 

Mrs. Octavia Furletti Secretary I 

Mrs. Sandra Klapper Secretary I 

Sharon Kritchton Stenographer 

Phyllis A. Reedt Stenographer 

Janis E. Poswiatowski Stenographer 

Maryland State Apprenticeship Council 

James L. Reid Director 

Edward J. Frack, Sr Supervisor of Apprenticeship 

Division of Certification and Accreditation 

W. Theodore Boston, Assistant State Superintendent 

Harold D. Reese Assistant Director and Supervisor of 

Teacher and Higher Education 

Charles C. Conlon Supervisor of Accreditation 

Carroll L. Speck Supervisor of Accreditation 

Helen L. Widmyer Supervisor of Accreditation 

M. Eleanor Rice Supervisor of Certification 

Howard E. Bosley Supervisor in Higher Education 

J. Edward Andrews, Jr Supervisor of Teacher Recruitment 

John C. Metzger Assistant Supervisor of Certification 

Ruth E. Hobbs Assistant Supervisor Equivalence Examinations 

Elsie F. Forman Counselor II 

Mrs. Evelyn R. McClurkin Counselor II 

Helen Ellis Secretary III 

Anne Nusinov Secretary III 

Mrs. Katherine Jay Bedford Secretary 1 

Nancy L. Fedor , Stenographer 

Margaret J. Edmonston Stenographer 

Gloria Style Stenographer 

Leah C. Dittmar Clerk-Typist I 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Gorrell Clerk-Typist I 

Geraldine L. Henry Clerk-Typist I 

Mrs. Marie F. Schumann Clerk-Tyiiist I 

Mrs. Hanna Z. Streett Clerk-Typist I 

Florence M. Brady Clerical Assistant 

* 2100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore 21218 



3 



Division of Administration and Finance 

Quentin L. Earhart, Assistant State Superintendent 

John W. Powder, Jr Chief, Division of Audits and Accounts 

Eleanor G. Weagly Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Walter F. Edwards Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

George A. Myers Supervisor of School Plant Planning 

Morris W. Rannels Supervisor of Transportation 

Charles V. Akeley Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Bernard G. Geyer Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

J. Harwood Naylor Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Helen D. George Editor 

Mrs. Mary C. Hoover Accountant IJ 

Casimer F. Kotowski Auditor II 

Samuel E. Sparks Accountant I 

Margaret E. Albaugh Administrative Assistant II 

Mrs. Mary B, Prince Principal Account Clerk II 

Phyllis E. Rodgers Principal Account Clerk II 

Janet L. Amole Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Blanche E. Dohler Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Anida L. England Principal Account Clerk I 

Catherine L. Flahavan Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Betty Lou Krieger Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Florence B. Ackerman Secretary III 

Mrs. Clara P. Haffner Property Custodian 

Sandra E. Wiener Stenographer 

Mrs. Patricia K. Lutz Secretary I 

Lenore Klein* Secretary I 

Bessie I. Rones Secretary I 

Helen D. Wysocki Secretary I 

Mrs. Agnes V. Bayne Report Typist 

Mrs. Dorothy H. Schroeder Clerk-Typist II 

Lloyd E. Holmes Office Appliance Operator I 

* Half time 

Division of Research and Development 

Wesley N. Dorn, Director (Leave of absence for one year) 

Richard K. McKay Acting Director 

R. Christine Hogan Supervisor of Research 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll Supervisor of Financial and Teacher Statistics 

Robert M. Bassford Data Processing Systems Analyst III 

Mrs. Mary H. Binebrink Research Assistant II 

Mrs. Genevieve J. Nekervis Research Assistant II 

Mrs. Virginia K. Goldsmith Statistical Assistant 

Mrs. Viola L. Merzbacher Statistical Assistant 

Lillian O. Erpenstein Secretary II 

Lenore Klein* Secretary I 

Mrs. Anastasia T. Lutz Secretary I 

Mrs. Doris A. Lombardi Key Punch Operator II 

Mrs. Thelma L. Baron Key Punch Operator I 

Selma R. Hoffman Key Punch Operator I 

* Half time 



Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 

Robert C. Thompson, Assistant State Superintendent 
R. Kenneth Barnes (January 1, 1965) 

W. Bird Terwilliger Assistant Director 

J. Leo. Delaney Supervisor of Case Services 

Raymond H. Simmons Supervisor of Field Services 

Merl D. Myers Supervisor of Mentally Handicapped 

George W. Keller* Assistant Supervisor of Services for the Blind 

Frances J. Borges, M.D,** , Medical Advisor 

Mrs. Mary R. Lacher Secretary II 

Mrs. Ruth-Ellen K. Darnell*** Administrative Asssitant II — 

(Employment of the Handicapped) 

Genevieve M. Schaum Secretary II 

Alice F. O'Connor Secretary II 

Mrs. Anna Belle Beckley Secretary II 

Mrs. Sylvia C. Feldman Secretary I 

Mrs. Eileen J. Hamilton* Stenographer 

Patricia R. Quinn*** Clerk-Typist II — (Employment of the Handicapped) 

* 2100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore 21218 
** Part time 
*** 1100 North Eutaw Street, Baltimore 21201 



4 



Metropolitan Baltimore Office 

2100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore 21218 

Thomas D. Braun Supervisor 

Harold B. Hayes Assistant Supervisor 

Ernest C. AUnutt, Jr Counselor II 

William R. Bay, Jr Counselor II 

Ross A. Bierly Counselor II 

Myrtle E. Chell Counselor II 

Mrs. Dorothy C. Cliirord Counselor II 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Cochran Counselor II 

James G. Dashiell Counselor II 

William T. Dixon, III Counselor II 

Niles R. Ellingson Counselor II 

James M. Griffin Counselor II 

Martha R. Harrison Counselor II 

Arthur H. Macqueen Counselor II 

Irvin D. Medinger Counselor II 

William B. Melville Counselor II 

Frank H. Nachman Counselor II 

James W. Persons Counselor II 

Charles L. Reis Counselor II 

Ruth F. Ring Counselor II 

Kathleen E. Scheve Counselor II 

Frank M. Skarupa Counselor II 

J. Donald Smyth Counselor II 

M. Eugene Spurrier Counselor II 

Lawrence E. Williams Counselor II 

Emma E. Lueckert Secretary III 

Mrs. Mabel C. Dwyer Secretary I 

M. Eleanor Farnandis Secretary I 

Mrs. Frances S. Goodwin Secretary I 

Mrs. Melvina A. Jackson Secretary I 

Mrs. Noma C. Johnson Secretary I 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Mosner Secretary I 

Mrs. Vivien L. Sener Secretary I 

Bell M. Sklar Secretary I 

Mrs. N. Helen Williams Secretary I 

Mrs. Rhona R. Wolf Secretary I 

Doris A. Martin Stenographer 

Amelia B. Moore Stenographer 

Mrs. Lolette I. York Stenographer 

Dorothy A. Gross Clerk-Typist II 

Mrs. Jean C. Callaghan Clerk-Typist I 

Eastern Shore District 

700 Main Street, Salisbury 21801 

Jack R. Nichols Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Robert M. Davis Counselor II 

William T. Phoebus. Jr Counselor II 

1 — .Joseph E. Guschke Counselor II 

2 — Frank A. Tarbutton Counselor II 

1 — Mrs. Ruth K. Lunsford Secretary I 

2 — Mrs. Dorothy H. Slagle Secretary I 

Mrs. Anne E. Bishop Secretary I 

Mrs. Mary Lee Harris Secretary I 

1— Stevens Building, 29 Goldsboro Street, Easton 21601 

2— County Building, 400 High Street, Chestertown 21620 

Southern Maryland District 

5106 Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville 20781 

W. Carroll Walsh Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Hugh F. Bunnell Counselor II 

A. Randolph Martin Counselor II 

Joseph A. Proctor Counselor II 

Mrs. Patricia Ann Sink Counselor II 

Robert W. Volmor Counselor II 

1 — Fedon G. Nides Counselor II 

1 — Milton W. Simmons Counselor II 

2 — Stanley I. Sober Counselor II 

3 — Alfred A. Dion Counselor II 

3 — Mrs. Priscilla J. Henshaw Counselor II 

3— Leif K. Kvalen Counselor II 

3— F. doPaul Whitehurst Counselor II 

1 — Mrs. Joannette M. Dart Secretary I 

2 — Mrs. Rebecca H. Clements Secretary I 



5 



3 — Mrs. Joan B. C. Clark Secretary I 

Mrs. Dorothy E. Briley Stenographer 

Katherine A. Purks Stenographer 

Mrs. Helena M. Wilson Secretary II 

1 — Speer Building, 3 Church Circle, Annapolis 21401 

2 — Court House, La Plata 20646 

3 — 114 Commerce Lane, Room 110, Rockville 20850 

Western Maryland District 

74 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 21740 

H, Dorsey Devlin Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Edward J. Shuck Counselor II 

Andrew J. Ungvarsky Counselor II 

1 — John M. Cobun Counselor II 

1 — John A. Folk Counselor II 

2 — Stanley Hamilton, Jr Counselor II 

2 — Vincent A. Sakievich Counselor II 

3— William C. Hill Counselor II 

3 — Kenneth L. Kuester Counselor II 

1 — Mrs. Betty J. Lovenstein Secretary I 

2 — Darlene E. Close Stenographer 

3 — Mrs. Elizabeth K. Baker Secretary I 

Mrs. Alfreda E. Coffman Secretary I 

Mrs. Annie G. McCarty (half-time) Secretary I 

Bonnie M. Winders Stenographer 

1— P.O. Box 504, 111 Union Street, Cumberland 21501 

2— P.O. Box 121, City Hall, Westminster 21157 

3— Board of Education, 115 East Church Street, Frederick 21701 

Crownsville State Hospital Unit 

Crownsville 21032 

Myron V. Wotring Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Rudolph N. Baker Counselor II 

Gene F. Szuch Counselor II 

Mrs. P. Henrietta Dickerson Secretary I 

Disability Determination Program 

(Old Age and Survivors' Insurance) 
10 East Fayette Street, Baltimore 21202 

Robert L. Burton Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Ernest C. Bersch Counselor I 

Myrtie M. Bozman Counselor I 

Jane R. Dummer Counselor I 

Minnie Gerber Counselor I 

Mrs. Anne D. Graham Counselor I 

Roger D. Griest Counselor I 

James L. Keelan Counselor I 

Mi-s. Vada B. Locklear Counselor I 

Mrs. Gloryann Snyder Counselor I 

Joseph M. Weatherly Counselor I 

Herbert L. Kronthal, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

Andrew A. Lewandowski, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

Hilary T. O'Herlihy, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

Anderson M. Renick, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

S. J. Venable. M.D.* Medical Adviser 

Frances S. Williams, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

Elizabeth B. DePolo Secretary I 

Mrs. Julia A. Fanning Secretary I 

Mrs. Gladys M. Matthews Secretary I 

Mrs. Anita C. Rosenberg Secretary I 

Anita Haman Transcribing Machine Operator 

Mary R. Lancelotta Transcribing Machine Operator 

Sondra L. White Transcribing Machine Operator 

Mrs. Betty Lee Wolfe Transcribing Machine Operator 

* Part-Time 



6 



MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 



state Office Building 
301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 21201 
Board of Trustees and Office Staff 

James A. Sensenbaugh, Chairman of the Board State Superintendent of Schools 

Louis L. Goldstein, Vice Chairman of the Board State Comptroller 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis, Member of the Board 

Supervisor of Instruction, Board of Education of Wicomico County 
B. Melvin Cole, Member of the Board 

Assistant Superintendent in Instruction, Board of Education of Baltimore County 

John A. Luetkemeyer, Member of the Board State Treasurer 

Christ G. Christis Director 

Stanley Katzen Assistant Director 

Edgar T. Pfaff Accountant I 

Lewis L. Tignor Investment Administrator 

Mildred Potash Accounting Staff 

Mary Lou Druery Investment Staff 

Leah Akers Investment Staff 

Donald Patterson Accounting Staff 

Mrs. Mildred Scott Principal Account Clerk I 

Ruth Connell Principal Account Clerk II 

Eva Shagogue Secretary I 

Mrs. Edna Doyle Accounting Machine Operator 

Agnes Ford Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Anne Trhlik Graphotype Operator 

Daniel Christopher Senior Account Clerk 

Marie Davis Clerk I 

Mary Lou Tingler Clerk Typist I 



STATE-AIDED PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND 

COUNTY LIBRARY LIBRARIAN 

Allegany Allegany County Library, Cumberland Charles S. Blank* 

Anne Arundel. ... Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library, 

Annapolis Ester K. King 

Baltimore City... Enoch Pratt Free Library Edwin Castagna 

Baltimore Baltimore County Public Library, Towson Charles W. Robinson 

Calvert Calvert County Public Library, 

Prince Frederick Mrs. Anita C. Potyen* 

Caroline Caroline County Public Library, Denton William N. Rairigh 

Carroll Carroll County Public Library, Westminster .... Rudolph J. Aubinger 

Cecil Cecil County Public Library, Elkton Mrs. Dorothy W. Jefferson 

Charles Charles County Public Library, LaPlata Mrs. Anita C. Potyen* 

Dorchester Dorchester County Public Library, Cambridge. . .Mrs. Ethel L. Bruya 

Frederick C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick Josephine P. Etchison 

Garrett Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, 

Oakland Edith G. Brock 

Harford Harford County Public Library, Bel Air Roenna Fahrney 

Howard Howard County Public Library, Ellicott City. . .Marvin Thomas 

Kent Kent County Public Library, Chestertown William N. Rairigh 

Montgomery Montgomery County Department of Public 

Libraries, Bethesda George B. Moreland 

Prince George's .. Prince George's County Memorial Library, 

Bladensburg Elizabeth B. Hage 

Queen Anne's .... Queen Anne's County Free Library, 

Centreville Mrs. Mary C. Johnston 

St. Mary's St. Mary's County Memorial Library, 

Leonardtown Mrs. Anita C. Potyen* 

Talbot Talbot County Free Library, Easton Mrs. Elizabeth H. Baker 

Washington Washington County Free Library, Hagerstown . .Edward B. Hall 

Wicomico Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury Mrs. Fred M. Horsley, Jr. 

Worcester Worcester County Library, Snow Hill Mrs. Dorothy G. Moore 

* Acting Librarian 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFFS 
LOCAL SCHOOL SYSTEMS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY 
108 Washington Street, Cumberland 21502 

Ralph R. Webster Superintendent of Schools 

Richard T. Rizer Assistant Superintendent & Supervisor High Schools 

Robert J. Shockley Assistant Superintendent and Director of Curriculum 

Jack A. Petry Supervisor of High Schools 



7 



Margaret E. Doak Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth I, Flake Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mary E. Straw Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Robert E. Pence Supervisor of Physical Education 

Lavern J. Hahn Supervisor of Music Education 

Theodore P. Foote Supervisor of Art Education 

Ruth C. McColly Supervisor of Home Economics Education 

Julius D. Lonnholm Supervisor of Vocational, Industrial, and Adult Education 

J. Hubert Radcliffe Supervisor of Transportation 

Joseph T. Downey Supervisor of Maintenance 

Gladys Miller Eaton Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Homer S. Higgins Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Esther M, Carter Visiting Teacher 

Edward G. Geis Visiting Teacher 

Glenn U. Hanna Visiting Teacher 

Eugene J. Hopkins Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Dixon Pitcher Financial Secretary and Office Manager 

Helen Burnett Dickerhoof Secretary to the Superintendent 

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 
P.O. Box 951, Green Street, Annapolis 21404 

David S. Jenkins Superintendent of Schools 

R. Harold McCann Assistant Superintendent Administration 

Richard R. Clopper Assistant Superintendent Secondary Schools 

Ruth V. Dudderar Assistant Superintendent Elementary Schools 

Fred L. Alexander Director of Planning 

Frank C. Gunderloy Director of School Facilities 

Mrs. Eva M. Pumphrey Director of Curriculum 

Grady L. Ballard Director of Personnel and Research 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Waring Director of Special Services for Children 

Katharine Kibler Supervisor of Publications 

Ernest H. Herklotz Supervisor of Purchasing 

Mrs. Madolyn R. Leonard Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Dennis W. Turner Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frank G. Baker, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Leviah Daniel Supervisor of Instruction Elementary Schools 

Robert Doenges Supervisor of Instruction Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Winifred Fowler Supervisor of Instruction Elementary Schools 

Frank Hebron Supervisor of Instruction Elementary Schools 

Sarah V. Jones Supervisor of Instruction Elementary Schools 

Carl Mauro Supervisor of Instruction Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia D. Moore Supervisor of Instruction Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Ruby G. Myers Supervisor of Instruction Elementary Schools 

Everett Pettigrew Supervisor of Instruction Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Reed Supervisor of Instruction Elementary Schools 

H. Elizabeth Slater Supervisor of Instruction Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mabel H. Parker Director of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia S. Ballard Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Alfred Bisset, Jr Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Carroll Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Katherine K. Frantum Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Douglas S. King Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Mrs. June K. King Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Norma Mezick Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Betty J. Mitchell Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Roland Olson Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Joshua M. Potter Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Mary Rossworm Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Glorious Shenton Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

James Wirth Supervisor of Instruction Secondary Schools 

Wayne M. Cornwell Supervisor Adult and Summer Programs 

Dorothy Noble Supervisor of Social Studies 

Doris Clements Supervisor of Home Economics 

Richard D. Carlson Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Margaret A. Adams Supervisor of Music 

William J. Callaghan Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mary E. Wellham Supervisor of Art 

Annabelle Ferguson Supervisor of Guidance 

Mrs. Nancy C. Walker Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Thelma Sparks Supervisor of Mathematics 

H. Allan Foutty Supervisor of Science 

Mrs. Mary Tronsue Supervisor of Business Education 

Leonard Woolf Supervisor of English 

Mary E. Moss Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Nancy Zastrow Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Mary Schanberger Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Lorelle Machen Supervisor of Psychological Services 

John Malcolm Psychologist 

George Meissler Psychologist 

Dorothy Moskowitz Psychologist 

Leon Kreitman Psychologist 



8 



Maine L. Groff Psychologist 

Mrs. Billie Lustgarten Psychologist 

Lois Rogers Assistant Supervisor of Music 

John Albert Supervisor of Constructioa 

Lawrence P. Bonari Assistant Supervisor Transportation 

Henry G. Weaver Assistant Supervisor Custodial Services 

Howard C. Reinhardt Assistant Supervisor Custodial Services 

Jack Ewald Budget and Fiscal Officer 

John Anderson Guidance Counselor 

Jack Hogslen Visiting Teacher 

B. Lewis Langdon Assistant in Personnel 

Mrs. Mary C. Brown Visiting Teacher 

James Leonard Cain Visiting Teacher 

Berry Carter Visiting Teacher 

Alice Gilbert Visiting Teacher 

Esther Hamilton Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elaine Huggins Visiting Teacher 

Jay Orr Visiting Teacher 

Arden M. Reynolds Visiting Teacher 

Paul Acito Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Simons Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Annie S. Witheridge Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth Strohl Secretary of Certification 

Mrs. Elizabeth Clopper Curriculum Librarian 

Mrs. Alice Torovsky Secretary to the Superintendent 

Earl Kirchner Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 



BALTIMORE CITY 
3 East 25th Street, Baltimore 21218 

George B. Brain Superintendent of Schools 

Edwin Stein Deputy Superintendent 

Houston R. Jackson Assistant Superintendent, Pupil Personnel and Staff Services 

M. Thomas Goedeke Assistant Superintendent Business Management 

Walter A. Maccubbin, 

Assistant Superintendent Staff Personnel and General Administrative Services 
Vernon S. Vavrina. .. .Assistant Superintendent Secondary Vocational and Adult Education 

William Pinderhughes Administrative Assistant General Administration 

Edward H. Goldstein Administrative Assistant General Administration 

Robert C. Lloyd Coordinator Citizens School Advisory Committee 

Riihard L. Micherdzinski Director of Art Education 

Robert H. Nicholson Director of Cafeterias 

Edith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

Vivian L Cord Area Director of Elementary Education 

Edward A. Gersuk Area Director of Elementary Education 

Clarence J. Gittings Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pearl W. Goetz Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. E. Romaine Jones Area Director of Elementary EducHtion 

Beatrice Rawlings Area Director of Elementary Education 

Elmon L. A'ernier Director of Physical Education 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent Elementary Education 

M. Bernice Wiese Director of Library Services 

J. Marion Magill Director of Music Education 

Kenneth Horvath Director of Personnel 

Angela M. Broening Director of Bureau of Publications 

John F. Giblette Director of Educational Testing Services 

Herbert Stern Director of Guidance and Placement 

Ambrose J. Chlada Director of School Facilities 

Arthur Lichtenstein Director of Special Services for Pupils 

H. Spilman Burns Director of Business Services 

Orlando F. Furno Director of Research 

Sidney N. Chernak Director of Secondary Schools 

William J. Hucksoll Director of Vocational Education 

Wilmer V. Bell Director of Adult Education 

Harrie M. Selznick Director of Special Education 

Sylvester H. Ogrince Director of School Buildings and Grounds 

Mrs. Helga Hermann Supervisor of Art Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian B. Reid Supervisor of Art Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pauline D. Smith Supervisor of Art Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elizabeth Vv'^alton Supervisor of Art Elementary Education 

George F. Horn Supervisor of Art Secondary Education 

Mrs. Virginia Timmons Supervisor of Art Secondary Education 

Mrs. Eloise Payne Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Elizabeth C. Bonthron Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Mrs. Ethel Heubeck Regional Cafeteria Manager 

Evelyn Richardson Regional Cafeteria Manager 

Mrs. May Richardson Regional Cafeteria Manager 

John E. Wall Supervisor of Cafeteria Facilities 

Maurice L. Reilly Business Manager of Cafeterias 

O. Eugene Albright Supervisor of School Accounting 

William F. Bocchetti Accounting Supervisor 

C. Wilson KnauflF Stores Supervisor 



9 



Frederick W. Kaufman Administrative Assistant Business Management 

Gustav A. Brandt Senior Administrative Officer 

Wallace C. Kirk Supervisor of Supply and Equipment Administration 

Irvin R. Brose Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

William Myers Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

Carl H. Seth Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

C. Frederick Muhl Associate Educational Supplies 

James Siunt Associate Educational Supplies 

Jack F. Bocher Supervisor of Transportation 

Holland S. Otis Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Herbert Knapp Supervisor Educational Equipment 

Emanuel Haifner Associate Educational Equipment 

Robert W. Hanauer Associate Educational Equipment 

Cecil G. Johnson Associate Educational Equipment 

Albert W. Clark District Supervisor Building Operations 

William T. Dorsey Supervisor of School Custodians 

Edward Bryant Area Supervisor Building Operations 

Ernest Gambrill Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Albert F. Hartka Manager of School Building Operations 

Elmer P. Jennings Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Edward A. Paris Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Sampson D. Ruffin Supervisor of Building Operations 

Joseph D. Scanlon Supervisor of Building Operations 

Meredith M. Smith Supervisor of Building Operations 

Bernard E. Majerovvicz Supervisor of Building Operations 

Peter J. Schaechtel Supervisor of Operating Engineers 

Walter C. Sushko Supervisor School Grounds Maintenance 

Irvin Lemel Supervisor School Electrical Maintenance 

Milton B. Malan Supervisor of School Repair Shop 

Thomas Wallace Special Assistant Elementary Education 

Mrs. Dolores Baden Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mildred B. Blackwell Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary E. Bowman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

George Brown Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Catherine Brunner Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Alice Buehner Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elizabeth Carr Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Anna Cella Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Vondalee Clark Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. M. Janet Ceselsky Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edith Corcoran Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. May G. Cornish Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Audrey J. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Dolores J. Deardorff Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Cleo A. Diggs Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Bettye Dorsett Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Dorothy A. Farmer Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Kathryn Frisby Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Betty Getz Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Bertha Goodman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Doris L. Hammond Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louisa Harston Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Gertrude Harwood Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary B. James Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Irene Joell Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ida Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jeanne'te Lewis Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Eleanor Lindner Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mary A. Metz Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marlene Mohamed Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Helen A. Nitkcski Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Peggy C. Nottingham Supervisor of Elementary Education 

James Owings Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Herman Pollhein Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louise Rankin Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Inez Reed Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Laverna W. Reed Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lou-se Robinson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Daniel Rochowiak Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian H. Ross Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marie B. Schmuck Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Edith Stark Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Carrie Staten Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pena D. Sugar Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jean S. Taylor Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Regina Tibbe's Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. S. Savilla Teiger Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louise Tildon Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Florence M. Udel Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Anita E. Woodlon Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Fei-^na E. Wright Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Sara K. Yudlson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Clay W. Stall Supervisor of Instructional Materials 



10 



Harold S. Hanson Supervisor of Library Services 

Lillie G. Patterson Supervisor of Library Services 

Mrs. Alice Rusk Supervisor of Library Services 

Corwin H. Taylor Supervisor of Instrumental Music Education 

Mrs. Alice S. Beer Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Mary Lewis Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Jane Parker Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Constance E. Pawelek Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Wilma Schell Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Don Regier Supervisor of Secondary School Vocal Music 

William C. McClean Supervisor of Personnel 

Walter A. Miller Specialist in Personnel 

Mrs. Osceola S. Ailor Specialist in Personnel 

Charlotte M. Hurtt Specialist in Personnel 

Louis A. Sedlak Specialist in Personnel 

Harry M. Bruce Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Ruth C. Cinsky Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Walter Robbins, Jr Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Eloise Thomas Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Leo G. Woods Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Julian Dyke Supevisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Mary Elizabeth McCoy Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Dean W. Forbes Specialist in Elementary Testing 

Neil R. Lovelace Specialist in Educational Testing 

Mary Jane Shapiro Specialist in Educational Testing 

Frederick S. Eyster Supervisor of Guidance and Placement 

Mrs. Carolyn Boston Supervisor of Guidance and Placement 

Mrs. Inez M. Pearson Supervisor of Guidance and Placement 

Lillian Buckingham Department Head of Placement Service 

Elizabeth Armstrong Supervisor of School Social Workers 

Paul Yaffe Supervisor of Psychological Services 

Charles Cephas Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Annie Dashiell Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Marjorie Everinghim Specialist in School Social Work 

Nelva Hobbs Specialist in School Social Work 

Dollie R. Walker Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Eva A. Weisman Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Helen C. Starr Department Head of Home Visitor Service 

Mrs. Eleanora B. Kane Supervisor of Radio and TV Education 

Clara E. Grether Supervisor of Research 

Harry C. Hendrickson Specialist in Research 

Chester Kiser Specialist in Research 

Michael Karas Specialist in Research 

Mrs. Elaine C. Davis Supervisor of Special Studies 

N. Neubert Jaffa Supervisor of Special Studies 

Frank Bennett Supervisor of Safety Education 

Herschel H. Newlin Administrative Supervisor of School Facilities 

Alexina C. Stidham Administrative Assistant 

Mrs. Josie G. Smith Supervisor of English 

L. Earl Wellemyer Supervisor of English 

Milton Velder Supervisor of English 

Mrs. Jean Owens Supervisor of English 

Thomas D. Troy Supervisor of Foreign Languages Secondary Scheols 

Leon Klompus Supervisor of Geography Secondary Schools 

Frank Fairbank Supervisor of History Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Edythe Myers Supervisor of History Secondary Schools 

William J. Gerardi Supervisor of Mathematics Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Eunice B. Schmied Supervisor of Mathematics Secondary Schools 

S. Leroy Taylor Supervisor of Mathematics Secondary Schools 

Elra M. Palmer Supervisor of Science Secondary Schools 

Sidney Blum Supervisor of Science Secondary Schools 

Robert Buxbaum Supervisor of Science Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy Fader Supervisor of Science Secondary Schools 

E. Duncan Hyde Supervisor of Business Education 

Forest L. Lawton Supervisor of Distributive Education 

Mrs. Nellie B. Nicholson Supervisor of Home Economics 

Suella Harrington Supervisor of Home Economics 

Stanley J. Pawelek Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Carl J. White Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Frank E. Ensminger Supervisor of Vocational Industrial Education 

Isaac Schkloven Supervisor of Vocational Industrial Education 

Roland Randall Supervisor of Vocational Industrial Education 

John G. Edelmann Supervisor of Printing 

Henry C. Johnson Supervisor of Vocational Equipment 

James O. Proctor Supervisor of Adult Education 

William McK. Rawlings Supervisor of Adult Education 

George R. Uchuck Supervisor of Adult Education 

Mrs. T>avinia W. Keagle Special Assistant of Special Education 

Mrs. Lois T. Murray Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Elsie Bevens Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Sadie Douglass Supervisor of Special Education 

Morton Esterson Supervisor of Special Education 

Helen Knox Supervisor of Special Education 



11 



Mrs. Lillian Maith Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Koma Stinchcomb Supervisor of Special Education Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Elsie Warrell Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Rosetta Williams Supervisor of Special Education 

Louise Young Supervisor of Special Eldiicaiion 

Shirley A. Jones Department Head of Speech Correction 

Mrs. Margaret Bisese Secretary to the Superintendent 



BALTIMORE COUNTY 
Aigburth Manor, Towson 21204 

William S. Sartorius Superintendent of Schools 

B. Melvin Cole Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

Joshua R. Wheeler Assistant Superintendent in Administration 

William T. Willis, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Finance 

Morris R. Baker Engineer in Charge of Construction, Operation and Maintenance 

Harvey W. Kreuzburg, Jr Director of Physical Facilities 

Gene D. Rush Director of Elementary Education 

Anne G. Shepperd Director of Elementary Education 

Norris A. King Director of Secondary Education 

John B. Shock, Jr Director of Secondary Education 

G. Alfred Helwig Director of Curriculum 

Walter M. Snyder Director of Personnel 

Charles M. DeWitt Director of Pupil Services 

Leon E. Grant Director of Purchasing 

Walter M. Gordon, Sr Director of Transportation 

Jerome Davis Director of Special Education 

Preston L. Grimm Director of Capital Improvement Planning 

Thomas M, Greene Director of Adult Education 

William A. Marshall, III Assistant Engineer in Charge of Construction 

Operation, and Maintenance 

George B. Breeden Mechanical Engineer, School Facilities 

William J. Kinling Manager, Data Processing 

Josiah A. Blacklock Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Shirley V. Connor Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Katherine Dost Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clotilde C. Drechsler Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Gene M. Hastings Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hilda Kestner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Eleanor B. Keqviard Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Francis A. Stapleton Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Lawrence C. Bolster Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Robert W. GifTord Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Margie B. Handy Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Samuel D. Herman Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Stella H. Johnston Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mary E. Saterlie Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Louella H. Woodward Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Vincent C. Brant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mary R. Childs Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Michael D. Eder Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Helen E. Hale Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Joseph B. Hillyard Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Jean R. Moser Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Carey K. Sentz Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Jean C. Sisk Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Charles W. Woodfield Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Olive T. Jobcs Supervisor of Art 

M. Ethel Troyer Supervisor of Art 

Thomas R. Lawrence Supervisor of Music 

Nicholas Ceriak Supervisor of Music 

John W. Craft Supervisor of Music 

Harold S. Martin Supervisor of Physical Education 

James L. Miller Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mildred H. Murray Supervisor of Physical Edu -ation 

Paul P. Plevyak Supervisor of Business Education 

Clarence F. Leisinger Supervisor of Adult Education 

George T. Gabriel Supervisor of Educational Research 

A. Price Ransone Coordinator of New Building Construction 

Arthur A. Dick Supervisor of Vocational Education 

William F. Kohl, Jr Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

William A. Odell Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Ruthetta L. Gilgash Supervisor of Home Economics 

Ruth S. Killian Supervisor of Home Economics 

Frances O. Fleming Supervisor of Library Services 

Elizabeth D. Hodges Supervisor of Library Services 

Gloria L. Engnoth Supervisor of Special Education 

Betty C. Reed Supervisor of Special Education 

Edna T. Warwick Supervisor of Special Education 

Pauline J. Hobbs Supervisor of Reading 

Gilbert B. Schiffman Supervisor of Reading 



12 



Margaret S. Farlow Supervisor of Certification 

Charles J. Leiman Supervisor of Clinical Services 

Anna R. Meeks Supervisor of Guidance 

Emma E. Williams Supervisor of Guidance 

John H. McCauley Supervisor of Testing 

Beatrice Wolcott Supervisor of Secondary Nursing Services 

E. Lyle Root Supervisor of Food Services 

Adele D. Woronka Supervisor of Food Services 

Robert C. Coleman, Jr Specialist in Personnel 

Joe. H. Leckione Specialist in Personnel 

Allen M. Sutton Specialist in Personnel 

John E. Seebold Specialist in Child Accounting 

Katherine M. Klier Specialist in Publications 

Lorena F. Simon Specialist in Library Services 

Herman C. Burton* Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mildred E. Jones Supervisor of Visiting Teachers 

Richard L. Blaine Visiting Teacher 

Edward A. Bogusko Visiting Teacher 

Amon Burgee. Ill Visiting Teacher 

Edna M. Congdon Visiting Teacher 

Bowyer E. Forsythe Visiting Teacher 

Robert F. Geckle Visiting Teacher 

Wanda S. Greene Visiting Teacher 

Therma Lee Harris Visiting Teacher 

John J. Hart Visiting Teacher 

Marie J. Hunycutt Visiting Teacher 

Thomas J. Jordon Visiting Teacher 

Irma R. Kell Visiting Teacher 

Frederick R. Keyton Visiting Teacher 

Susan S. Kleis Visiting Teacher 

Eliza S. McDaniel Visiting Teacher 

Vivian S. Mcintosh Visiting Teacher 

Evelyn V. Maus Visiting 'leacher 

Frances N. Osgood Visiting Teacher 

Angelo J. Quaranta Visiting Teacher 

Lous S. Sagi Visiting Teacher 

Helen Louise Scarborough Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Z. Steiner Visiting Teacher 

Mary J. Stoll Visiting Teacher 

Kathryn B. Stonesifer Visiting Teacher 

Mary A. Van Wiggeren Visiting Teacher 

Mary G. Wheeler Visiting Teacher 

Delores S. Young Visiting Teacher 

Ronald Banner Psychologist 

Olga D. Cooper Psychologist 

William A. Doyle Psychologist 

Jeston Hamer Psychologist 

Morris S. Lasson Psychologist 

Jordan Lawrence Psychologist 

Marion H. Pelton Psychologist 

Sheldon K. Riggs Psychologist 

Roger E. Saunders Psychologist 

Walter E. Schult Psychologist 

Ruth L. Sherman Psychologist 

Sheldon L. Shubert Psychologist 

Dorothy S. Windham Psychologist 

James H. Wise Psychologist 

Evelyn C. Norton Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

David H. Black Assistant in Planning 

Karl V. Sloop Assistant in Audio Visual Education 

John H. Day, Jr Assistant in Educational Information 

William C. Feader Supervisor of Accounting 

C. Barry Carpenter Supervisor of School Accounting 

Gene H. Granger Assistant in Accounting 

John T. Black Assistant in Accounting 

E. Brian Fleming Assistant in Accounting 

Charles E. Jockel Assistant in Purchasing 

Lydia E. Berry Chief Payroll 

G. Leroy Black Assistant in Transportation 

Fred C. Donovan Assistant in Transportation 

C. Thomas Dunnock Assistant in Transportation 

Grason E. Fowble Assistant in Transportation 

Edwin A. Rommel, Jr Assistant in Transportation 

Karl F. Swem Assistant in Transportation 

Henry E. Schleisener Director of Grounds 

Herd S. Eburg Supervisor of Plant Operations and Maintenance 

Thomas S. Bowyer Supervisor of Grounds Maintenance 

May S. Williams Area Manager Food Services 

Elaine B. Isennock Secretary to the Superintendent 

*Died October 25, 1964 



13 



CALVERT COUNTY 
Prince Frederick 20678 

Maurice A. Dunkle Superintendent of Schools 

George D. Higgs Director of Administration 

Douglas M. Bivens, Jr Director of Instruction 

Jefferson A. Dardin Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Thelma M. Cornish Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred G. Finlon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lola M. Parks Director of Pupil Services 

Mrs. Ruth N. Reid Visiting Teeacher 

Lloyd J. Falk Supervisor of Maintenance 

William J. Middleton Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Virginia D. Parran Chief Bookkeeper 

E. Anne Yoe Secretary to Superintendent 

CAROLINE COUNTY 
Law Building, Denton 21629 

Wilbur S. Hoopengardner Superintendent of Schools 

Fred G. Usilton Director of Instruction 

Louise C. Dennison Supervisor of Instruction 

Lewis W. Davis Supervisor of Instruction 

Frederick H. Sheeley Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Richard W. Hall Supervisor of Plant Operations 

George H. Caple Supervisor of Transportation 

Bertha L. Miller Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Virginia M. York Secretary Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Barbara J. Bacsak Secretary to Superintendent 

CARROLL COUNTY 
County Office Building, Westminster 21157 

Samuel M. Jenness Superintendent of Schools 

Charles I. Ecker Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

John F. Wooden, Jr Director of Instruction, Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Margaret M. Bailer Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert S. Martin, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Evan F. Bowers Supervisor of High and Elementary Schools 

Ruth E. Devore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Reck Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

George E. Baker Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Josephine D. West Supervisor of Home Economics and School Lunch 

Philip S. Royer Supervisor of Music 

Maye E. Grimes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Dolores C. Snyder Supervisor Guidance Counseling 

Robert T. Snyder School Psychologist 

Paul E. Bowersox, II Visiting Teacher 

Herbert E. Ruby, Jr Visiting Teacher 

Maryln C. Green Speech Therapist 

Mrs. Eileen S. Turner Speech Therapist 

Roland F. Haifley Assistant in Custodial Service 

Maurice V. Wolfe Assistant in General Maintenance and Utilities 

Mrs. Martha S. Gilbert Office Manager Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Pauline D. Peterson Financial Secretary 

CECIL COUNTY 
308 Court House, Elkton 21921 

Robert A. Gibson Superintendent of Schools 

Walter J. Finn Assistant Superintendent, Administration and Personnel 

Richard L. Holler Assistant Superintendent, Instruction and Curriculum 

William C. Graham Supervisor of English, Social Studies and Foreign Languages 

Robert W. Gaddis Supervisor of Mathematics Science, Business Education, 

Boys Physical Education and Special Education 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Kay Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Norman J. Moore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rachel E. Boyd Supervisor of Home Economics and School Lunch Program 

Louis P. Wright Supervisor of Industrial Education and Director of Purchasing 

Mrs. Grace B. Dubose Supervisor of Music Art, Library and Girls Physical Education 

Samuel Dixon Supervisor of Transportation and Driver Education 

Edwin H. Barnes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Mary A. Grouse Visiting Teacher 

Robert E. Jaccard Visiting Teacher 

Rose R. Scheck Reading Specialist 

Margaret T. Durkin Speech Therapist 

Mrs. Catherine Kirkpatrick Helping Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth Dollenger Helping Teacher 



14 



James M. Renn Supervisor of Maintenance 

Willard W. Taylor Director of Finance 

George E. Matthews Assistant in Finance 

Mrs. Ruth Craig Audiometrist 

Mrs. Dorothy Reynolds Secretary to the Superintendent 

CHARLES COUNTY 
Court House, Charles Street, La Plata, 20646 

Fred J. Brown, Jr Superintendent of Schools 

Edward C. Turner Director of Instruction 

Mrs. Cecelia G. Farrall Director of Pupil Personnel Services 

Allen R. Gaddis, III Director of Business Administration 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Brown Supervisor of High Schools 

James E. Forcum Supervisor of High Schools 

John W. Manspeaker Supervisor of Science and Mathematics 

Mrs. Mary B. Neal Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Christine E. Pearson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Jerry V. McSpadden Reading Coordinator 

Warren H. Deyermond Supervisor of Transportation 

Margaret A. Posey Supervisor of School Lunch Program and Purchasing 

Elliott H. Dejarnette, III Supervisor of School Facilities 

Mrs. Georgia B. Lucas Visiting Teacher 

Robert M. Matula Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Julia C. Totten Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Marianne M. Canter Financial Secretary 

Carmelita Alston Spee h Therapist 

Mrs. Virginia T. Lowe Speech Therapist 

Clorinda Smothers Speech Therapist 

DORCHESTER COUNTY 
403 High Street, Cambridge 21613 

James G. Busick Superintendent of Schools 

Charles F. Hurley Supervisor of High Schools 

Thomas A. Flowers Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Evelyn E. Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Viola J. Comegys Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John T. Comer, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Larry Henry Visiting Teacher 

John F. Armstrong Supervisor of Transportation 

John A. Marshall, Jr Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Mary W. LeCompte Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Dorothy S. Stephens Secretary to Superintendent 

FREDERICK COUNTY 
115 East Church Street, Frederick 21701 

John L. Carnochan, Jr Superintendent of Schools 

C. Edward Hamilton Assistant Superintendent for Instruction 

Herman A. Hauver Director of Pupil Services 

Donald Z. Koons Supervisor of Personnel 

Karl S. Manwiller Supervisor of High Schools 

Glenn E. Warneking Supervisor of Science and Mathematics 

Mrs. Evelyn F. S. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Alice M. Love Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Louise F. Thompson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Janice Wickless Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Betty M. Franklin Helping Teacher 

Warren R. Evans Supervisor of Physical Education 

James L. Fisher Supervisor of Music 

Alice L. Robinson Supervisor of Library Service 

Mrs. Mary N. Stutz Supervisor of Home Economics 

Richard E. Summers Supervisor of Art 

Eugene F. Wood, Jr Supervisor of Vocational Education 

Paul L. Hoffmaster Supervisor of Trarsportation 

Mrs. Virginia D. Klos Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Paul E. Fogle Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Joseph E. Rexroad Home Visitor 

Mary E. Fiery Home Visitor 

Robert L. Haugen Home Visitor 

John E. Tritt Supervisor of Purchasing 

Tolbert F. Lawyer Supervisor of School Facilities 

H. D. Williams Assistant in Plant Operations 

William J. E. Null Assistant in Plant Maintenance 

William R. Hess Assistant in Administration Accounting 

Mrs. Pauline J. Bowlus Secretary to Superintendent 



15 



GARRETT COUNTY 
40 South Fourth Street, Oakland 21550 

Willard L. Hawkins Superintendent of Schools 

Albert R. Ringer Supervisor of High Schools 

Edwin W. Elias Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

A. B. Dean Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Robert R. Martin Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Margaret S. McComas Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Lucile T. Ludvigsen Secretary to Superintendent 

HARFORD COUNTY 
45 East Gordon Street, Bel Air 21014 

Charles W. Willis Superintendent of Schools 

Alfonso A. Roberty Assistant Superintendent 

George N. Bollinger Administrative Assistant 

William P. Byers Administrative Assistant 

Clinton D. Cutright Administrative Assistant 

Edward J. Plevyak Administrative Assistant 

John W. Cooney Administrative Assistant 

Ralph H. Morgan Building Engineer 

Howard B. Peters Director of Instruction 

C. Clark Jones Director of Personnel 

George B. Prettyman, Sr Director of Public Relations 

Mrs. Jane M. Gent Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Violet D. Merryman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Levin R. Heath Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hunter C. Sutherland Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Richard J. Williams Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Leslie D. Goodwin Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Marita W. Watts Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Gertrude B. Rich Supervisor of Special Education 

Slater W. Bryant, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Alden H. Halsey Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowe Supervisor of High Schools 

Thomas L. Smith Supervisor of High Schools 

Ann Etta G. Wright Supervisor of High Schools 

Earle B. Wagner Supervisor of Science 

Howard R. Cheek Supervisor of Transportation 

John R. Walker Supervisior of Industrial Education 

Mary Ellen Kennedy Supervisor of Library Services 

W. Warren Sprouse Supervisor of Music 

James H. Clow, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles C. McCullough Visiting Teacher 

John H. Willis, Jr Visiting Teacher 

Joseph F. Snee Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Alice W. Crowl Financial Secretary 

Elizabeth S. Goodrich Secretary to Superintendent 



HOWARD COUNTY 
7 Park Avenue, Ellicott City 21042 

John E. Yingling Superintendent of Schools 

Robert S. Shaffner Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary R. Hovet Director of Instruction 

Frank B. Durigg Supervisor of High Schools 

Max A. Smith Supervisor of High Schools 

Wilhelmina E. Oldfield Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mary R. White Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

George E. Klinkhamer Director of Personnel and Supervisor of Special Education 

Harry T. Murphy Supervisor of Transportation 

Olive G. Mumford Supervisor of Library Services and Music 

Mrs. Joan H. Weatherholtz Supervisor of Home Economics and School Lunch Program 

Gilbert E. Miller Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Walter D. Phelan Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Media H. Pennington Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irene M. Johnson Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Edith R. Crue Secretary of Superintendent 

Mrs. Helen W. Ross ...School Psychologist 

Katherine Dodge Speech Therapist 

Eugene Estes Visiting Teacher Physical Education 

John A. Soles Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

William Buser Supervisor of Elementary Schools 



16 



KENT COUNTY 
400 High Street, Chestertown 21620 

Reade W. Corr Superintendent of Schools 

Robert J. Johnson Supervisor of Transportation and High Schools 

Carey E. Lacey Supervisor of High Schools 

Louise Hepbron Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Sara B. Chambers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Robert J. Eckert Supervisor of Guidance and Testing 

Mrs. Madeleine Fennell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Clara M. Chaires Chief Bookkeeper and Clerk 

Mrs. Shirley Jacob Assistant Bookkeeper and Clerk 

Mrs. Florence C. Ward Secretary to Superintendent and Credentials Secretary 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 
850 North Washington Street, Rockville 20850 

Homer O. Elseroad Superintendent of Schools 

James C. Craig Assistant Superintendent for Instructional and Personnel Services 

John A. Permenter Assistant Superintendent for Administration 

Donald E. Deyo Dean Montgomery Junior College 

Joseph R. Manno Methods and Procedures Analyst 

Mrs. Mary G. Walters Assistant Secretary to the Board of Education 

Samuel M. Goodman Director Research 

Thomas V. Bilek Supervisor Research 

Richard C. Ahlberg Area Supervisor 

John P. Causey Area Supervisor 

Henry C. Gregory Area Supervisor 

Mrs. Ruth S. Gue Area Supervisor 

Alton J. Childers Area Supervisor 

John M. King Area Supervisor 

Theophil K. Muellen Area Supervisor 

Bob R. Nichols Area Supervisor 

Martha A. Satlerfield Area Supervisor 

Ernest W. Snodgrass Area Supervisor 

Joseph J. Tarallo Area Supervisor 

William C. Feddeman Director Supervisory Services 

Frances M. Hanson Supervisor Social Studies 

Mrs. Louise S. Walker Supervisor Instructional Materials 

Etheleen Daniel Supervisor Science 

Mary L. Grau Supervisor Mathematics 

Mary F. Mitchell Supervisor Language Arts 

Philip E. Arsenault Supervisor Foreign Languages 

Edmund T. Burke Supervisor Science 

Kieran J. Carroll Supervisor Curriculum Development 

William J. Fleming Supervisor Mathematics 

Noble V. Fritz Supervisor Business and Driver Education 

Edmund S. Hoffmaster, Jr Supervisor Science 

Ehvood B. Mason Supervisor Industrial and Technical Education 

Charles M. Proctor, Jr Supervisor Matheniatics 

Louise G. W^in field Supervisor Foreign Languages 

Crescent J. Bride Supervisor Physical Education 

Mrs. Norma C. Day Supervisor Adult Education Evening School 

Katherine B. Greaney Supervisor Language Arts 

Charles T. Horn Supervisor Music 

Mrs. Grace W. Kurtz Supervisor Reading Services 

James D. Morgan Director of Testing 

Leonard T. Oass Supervisor Industrial and Technical Education 

Mitchell V. Owens Supervisor Health and Safety 

Mrs. Wretha K. Petersen Supervisor Special Education 

Chester J. Petranek Supervisor Music 

William R. Porter Supervisor Special Education 

Jacob Rabinovich Supervisor Social Studies 

Charles I. Wiles, Jr Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

William L. Barall Budget Officer 

Mrs. Anne W. Caldwell Supervisor Research 

Richard Darling Supervisor Library 

Mrs. Jean R. Gehman Supervisor Social Studies 

Phihp Stroniowsky Supervisor Special Education Mentallv Retarded 

Barbara L. Riley Supervisor Phvsical Education 

Kenneth W. Rollins Supervisor Guidance 

Mrs. Hazel A. Smith Supervisor Music 

Mrs. Marjorie B. St. Clair Supervisor Art 

J^r?^^,^- Ward Supervisor Field Studies 

Jtjlia W Watkins Supervisor Home Arts 

Elizabeth C Wilson Director Curriculum Development 

Richard E. Collier . Director StafT Development 

Mrs. Marion C. Beckwith Assistant Director Curriculum Development 

Alan L. Dodd Assistant Director Curriculum Development 

James W. Coley Editor, Curriculum Development 

James W. Jacobs Director Instructional Materials 



17 



Edward W. Barth Manager Central Processing Center 

Robert E. Schneider General Supervisor 

T. H. Owen Knight Director Pupil Services 

Sheldon B. Peizer Supervisor Psychological Services 

Mrs. Ruth W. Beebe Psychologist 

Mrs. Louisa R. Bilon Psychologist 

Michael A. Deem Psychologist 

Mrs. Viviane D. Durell Psychologist 

B. Miller Eves Psychologist 

Gilbert Ghitelman Psychologist 

Paul H. Humphreys Psychologist 

Mrs. Kate C. Kern Psychologist 

Mrs. Ruth H. Linn Psychologist 

Enzo J. Monti Psycho'ogist 

Stewart G. Pennington Psychologist 

Mrs. Blanche D. Rochmes Psychologist 

Allen S. Rowe Psychologist 

Donald T. Schaeffer Psychologist 

Mrs. Charlotte M. Simos Psychologist 

Leonard Small Psychologist 

Mrs. Mary Jo MacGregor Psycho'ogist 

Martin W. Spickler Psychologist 

George Usdansky Psychologist 

Ernest C. Young Psychologist 

Reno A. Continetti Area Supervisor Pupil Pe sonnel 

Robert C. Henley Area Supervisor Pupil Personnel 

Weymouth H. Judkins Area Supervisor Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Edith P. Popenoe Area Supervisor Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Marjorie L. Van Dien Area Supervisor Pupil Personnel 

Richard A. Cleveland Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Mildred D. Cooper Pupil Personnel Worker 

Robert F. Fioramonti Pupil Personnel Worker 

Jewel A. Green Pupil Personnel Worker 

John H. Grentzner Pupil Personnel Worker 

Edward A. Hebda Pupil Personnel Worker 

Raymond P. Henry Pupil Personnel Worker 

Andrew L. Hugar Pupil Personnel Worker 

Joseph E. Jodl Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Helen L. Kohut Pupil Personnel Worker 

Frank W. Kovacs Pupil Personnel Worker 

J. Patrick McCarthy Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Constance P. Cherry Pupil Personnel Worker 

John E. McCue Pupil Personnel Worker 

Carl E. Mitchell Pupil Personnel Worker 

William B. Prigg Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Hope M. Reid Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Geraldine M. Reynolds Pupil Personnel Worker 

Joseph A. Sagneri Pupil Personnel Worker 

Henry T. Shetterly Pupil Personnel Worker 

Arthur E. Spaulding Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Eileen D. Wilkinson Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Marie H. Wilson Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Esther F. Samler Supervisor Pupil Appraisal and Placement 

William A. Early Director Personnel 

Mrs. Irma B. Dumford Assistant Director Supporting Services Personnel 

Robert G. McCord Supervisor Personnel Evaluations and Records 

Gerald G. Reymore Supervisor Personnel Certification 

Forrest G. Shearin, Jr Supervisor Teacher Personnel 

Jack D. Hill Supervisor Teacher Personnel 

Charles A. Walker Supervisor Personnel Supporting Services 

Mrs. Helen M. Johnson Area Supervisor 

Paul A. Henry Director School Services 

Anton N. Suttora Director Procurement 

Mason A. Nelson Director Supply 

Richard M. Ream Director Transportation 

George V. Menke Director Operations 

Mrs. Corelli A. David Director School Lunch 

Mrs. Jane B. Boyd Assistant Director School Lunch 

Joseph G. Dicarlo Assistant Director School Lunch 

Lester J. Welch Director School Facilities 

Henry J. Hilburn Director P anning 

E. Guy Jewell Assistant Director Planning 

Gardner B. Jordan Director of Site Acquisition 

James H. Sheldon Director Construction 

Frank Snyder Assistant Director Construction 

J. Leonard Mullinix , Director Maintenance 

Brian M. Benson Director Financial Services 

Reginald J. Crockett Assistant Director Financial Services 

Richard B. Grove Assistant Director Financial Services 

V. Wilson Campbell Director Accounting 

Wilton L. Kennedy Director Auditing 

H. Douglas Hall Director Data Processing 

18 



Charles Beaudoin Systems Analyst 

Charles W. Hoover Systems Analyst 

J. Gordon McDonald, Jr Director Insurance and Federal Aids 

Alfred B. Rico Director Payroll 

Mrs. Helen S. Joseph Secretary to the Superintendent of Schools 



PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 
Upper Marlboro 20870 

William S. Schmidt Superintendent of Schools 

Rowannetta S. Allen Assistant Superintendent of Schools Elementary Education 

George H. Robinson Assistant Superintendent of Schools Secondary Education 

Thomas S. Gwynn, Jr Assistant Superintendent of Schools Supporting Services 

Edward S. Beach, Jr Director of Curriculum and In-Service Training Program 

Arthur E. Robinson Director of School Construction 

Katherine Fossett Director of Pupil Services 

Kalman J. Vozar Director of School Business Affairs and Office Manager 

James F. Seals Systems Analyst 

Margaret A. Beardsley Supervisor of Kindergartens 

Emma M. Bowman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Eunice E. Burdette Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rita M. Donovan Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William W. Hall Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Leila V. Hardesty Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Lawrence Hervey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

A. Mildred Hoyle Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elizabeth C. Kelly Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Thomas Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Linnie B. Marshall Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elizabeth McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Louise C. Rymer Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Stella Spicknall Supervisor of Reading and Study Skills 

Mrs. Helen H. Brashears Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Nelda Davis Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Gladys Longley Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Bruce Hoak Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Dora Kennedy Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Truman S. Klein Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Yvonne Moore Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Howard B. Owens Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Snouffer Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

John A. Woods Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Steven Lutz Assistant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Russell Olson Supervisor Adult Education Program and 

Coordinator of Evening High Schools 

Katherine Flynn Coordinator of School Work Experience Programs 

Mrs. Mary Beth Wackwitz Supervisor of Art Education 

Ronald Uhl Supervisor of Audio Visual Education 

Mary A. Thompson Supervisor of Health Education and Health Services 

M. Gladys Dickerson Supervisor of Home Economics 

Samuel Geissenhainer Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Mrs. Louise B. Bennett Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Frances H. Lynch Supervisor of Music 

Nancy McNary Supervisor of Music 

Vincent C. Holochwost Supervisor of Physical Education 

Ada Mae Warrington Supervisor of Physical Education 

C. Elizabeth Rieg Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Frances R. Fuchs Assistant Supervisor of Special Education 

Margaret Conant Coordinator Teacher and Parent Child Studv Programs 

Eugenia Balsley Supervisor of Publications 

Francis Parker Coordinator Safety Education Activities 

Victor Rice Supervisor Testing and Research 

Arthur Green Supervisor of Psychological Services 

Kevin P. Dwyer School Psychologist 

Mrs. Rachael Nelson School Psychologist 

Mrs. Martha Odell School Psychologist 

Mrs. Jane Austin Helping Librarian 

Helen Bowman Helping Librarian 

E'^/'y Durrett Helping Librarian 

William Laslo Helping Teacher Science 

Ihomas Paskalides Helping Teacher Phvsical Education 

Conrad Seeboth Helping Teacher Mathematics 

David Young Helping Teacher Art 

Marian E Lobdell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles Wendorf Assistant Supervisor Pupil Personnel 

Edna Arnn p^ipil Personnel Worker 

Su",?- ^- I^ui'^ess Pupil Personnel Worker 

Phillip Cifizzari Pupil Personnel Worker 

Samuel Cooke Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Zelda Dunlap Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Hamilton Pupil Personnel Worker 



19 



Mrs. Jane Hammill Pupil Personnel Worker 

Roger W. Hart Pupil Personnel Worker 

Willie Mae Henson Pupil Personnel Worker 

William R, Hinely Pupil Personnel Worker 

Harry T. Hughes Liaison Juvenile Court 

Mrs. Alma Hybarger Pupil Personnel Worker 

M. Dorothy Jump Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Ethel L. Kirchmer Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Arlene A. Korn Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Joyce Lilly Pupil Personnel Worker 

Otha Myers Pupil Personnel Worker 

Richard A. Myers Pupil Personnel Worker 

Robert C. Nabors Pupil Personnel Worker 

Jon F. Peterson Pupil Personnel Worker 

Jeffery Robbins Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Charlotte Spencer Pupil Personnel Worker 

John P. Spicer Pupil Personnel Worker 

Paul Tonetti Pupil Personnel Worker 

Delbert Tweit Pupil Personnel Worker 

D. Carl McMillen Director of Personnel and Credentials 

J. Howard Skidmore Supervisor of Personnel and Credentials Elementary Division 

Florence Spicknall Supervisor of Personnel and Credentials Secondary Division 

James Panor Planning Specialist 

Alan Poole Supervisor of Maintenance 

Lorton Layman Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Leon Stout Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Daniel Wagner Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Franklin B. Klase Supervisor of Plant Operation 

Oren T. Graser Assistant in Building Plans and Specifications 

William H. Smith Building Inspector 

Henry M. Potter Building Inspector 

Flora Schroyer Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Mrs. Dolores Edelin Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Mrs. Margaret Young Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

John W. Heim Director of Transportation 

Leroy Contee Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Russell O. Eckert Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Anthony R. Miller Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Ruth Jefferson Assistant Treasurer 

Mrs. Helen S. Bowie Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Martha T. Gibson Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Betty R. Collinson Assistant Secretary to the Board of Education 

QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 
Centreville 21617 

Harry C. Rhodes Superintendent of Schools 

John E. Miller Supervisor of Transportation 

Philip G. Jackson High School Supervisor 

Mrs. Alberta C. Browne Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Margaret S. Stack Elementary Supervisor 

John H. Webb High School Supervisor 

M. Rogers Smith Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Marie Shortall Financial Secretary 

Donna Harrington Stenographer 



ST. MARY'S COUNTY 
Leonardtown 20650 

Robert E. King, Jr Superintendent of Schools 

James H. Ogden Assistant Sui^erintendent and Director of Instruction 

E. Violette Young Supervisor of Instruction 

Edward Siemasko Supervisor of Instruction 

Ralph S. Waters Supervisor of Instruction 

Jane G. Mattingly Supervisor of Instruction 

A. Hope Swann Supervisor of Instruction 

Harriet H. Reeder Director of Pupil Services 

James D. Adams Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Beulah S. Bennett Visiting Teacher 

James E. McCleaf Supervisor of Guidance 

Stanley O. Schrader Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Dolores G. Rose Coordinator of Cafeteria Services 

Mrs. Barbara Kratz Teacher Specialist in Foreign Languages 

Henry J. Kanowicz Director of Business Administration 

Mrs. Elberta W. Hayden Financial Secretary 

Lloyd E. Johnston Maintenance Engineer 

Paul T. Hannen Assistant Maintenance Engineer 



20 



SOMERSET COUNTY 
Court House Annex, Princess Anne 21853 



John L. Bond 

Mrs. Alice Mae Beauchamp 

George F. Carrington 

Kermit A. Cottman 

Charles O. Burns, Jr 

Clarence N. Baughan 

Mrs. Alva B. Laird 

Mrs. Marian T. Colborn . . . 



Superintendent of Schools 

Supervisor Elementary Schools 

Supervisor High Schools 

Supervisor High and Elementary Schools 

Supervisor Pupil Services 

Supervisor of Transportation 

Financial Secretary 

Secretary to the Superintendent 



TALBOT COUNTY 
P.O. Box 1029, Easton 21601 

Gerald E. Richter Superintendent of Schools 

Arthur R. Higginbottom Supervisor of High Schools 

John W. Barrett Supervisor of Hig:h Schools 

Mrs. Lillian C. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Kathleen A. Francis Supervisor of Elementaiy Schools 

Marpie Slaughter Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

P. Kennard Wright Supervisor of Maintenance 

Edward E. Motovidlak Supervisor of Transportation 

Randolph L. Dunham Controller 



WASHINGTON COUNTY 
Commonwealth Avenue, Hagerstown 21710 

William M. Brish Superintendent of Schools 

William C. Diehl Assistant Superintendent 

William L. Donaldson Assistant Superintendent 

T. Wilson Cahall Administrative Assistant 

Russell L. Kepler Director of Operational Str vices 

Carl M. Mann Director of Purchasing 

Douglas M. Bivens Director of Curriculum and Supervision 

F. Richard Crowther Director of Finances 

Victor R. Martin Director of Pupil Services 

Herbert C. Logsdon Supervisor of Senior High Schools 

Charles E. Hodges Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Annilea H. Browne Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Frances Grimes Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

C. Scott Couchman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Miriam L. Hoffman Supervisor of Music 

H. Edwin Semler Supervisor of Physical Education 

Alfred C. Roth, Jr Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Claude B. Brubeck Supervisor of Driver Education and Safety 

Catherine L. Beachley Supervisor of Guidance and Research 

W. Harland Biggs Supervisor of Plant Operation 

Joseph H. Vance Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Anormallee M. Way Supervisor of School Lunch 

W. Carlton Parsley School Lunch Assistant 

Robert F. Lesher Supervisor of Audiovisual (Coordinator 

Closed Circuit Television Instruction) 

George H. Ropp Supervisor of Instruction Closed Circuit Television Instruction 

Wilbur G. Kelley Engineer Closed Circuit Television Instruction 

Mrs. Frances H. Machen Visiting Teacher 

Mary E. Byer Visiting Teacher 

Douglass C. Cochran Visiting Teacher 

William Wells Visiting Teacher 

Theodore S. Hull Purchasing Assistant 

Frank M. Harlacher, Jr Coordinator of Public Information and Publications 

Mrs. Lois R. Malott Secretary to Superinten;lent 



WICOMICO COUNTY 
Court House. Salisbury 21801 

Royd A. Mahaffey Superintendent of Schools 

Sheldon B. Dawson Assistant Superintendent 

Harold A. Fulton Director of Instruction 

Charles R. Berry Supervisor of Instruction 

Ernest T. Cullen Supervisor of Instruction 

Marie A. Dashiell Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis Supervisor of Instruction 

Martha R. Jones Supervisor of Instruction 

Clarence P. McKinley, Jr Supervisor of Instruction 

Louise L. Mitchell Supervisor of Instruction 

Frederick H. Spipler, Jr Super\'is"ir of Instruction 

Mrs. Hazel J. Hearne Supervisor of Instruction Television 



21 



Edith W. Matthews Supervisor of Instruction and Cafeterias 

Warren D. Bloodsworth, Jr Visiting Teacher 

Richard B. Sheridan, Jr Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Cora G. Smith Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

H. Victor Keen, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Joanna Lankford Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Geneva D. Purnell Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Dorris D. Kelley Secretary to Superintendent 



WORCESTER COUNTY 
Market Street, Snow Hill 21863 



Paul S. Hyde 

Frederick G. Livingood, Jr. 

Alfred S. Hancock 

Mrs. Louise S. Adkins . . . . 

Frederick D. Fletcher 

Wilbur A. Jones 

Ernest G. Holland 

Robert H. Layman 

Benjamin W. Nelson 

Elsie M, Dryden 



Superintendent of Schools 

Supervisor of High Schools 

Supervisor of High School 

Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Administrative Assistant 

Supervisor of Maintenance and Plant Operation 

Supervisor of Transportation 

Clerk 



22 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 24 

Legislation Affecting Education 25 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 28 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education: 

Instruction 43 

Certification and Accreditation 58 

Library Extension 64 

Vocational Education 69 

Administration and Finance 74 

Research and Development 78 

Vocational Rehabilitation 83 

Statistical Tables 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 89 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of PubHc and Nonpublic Schools 90 

Number of Different Pupils in PubHc and Nonpublic Schools 91 

Grade Enrollment 92 

Births in Maryland 100 

Handicapped Children, Schools and Classes for Atypical Children 101 

Withdrawals from Public Schools 112 

Nonpromotions in Public Schools 113 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 116 

High School Enrollment by Subject 135 

Enrollment in Individual High School Subjects 136 

Teachers by: Average Number Belonging, Summer School Attendance, 
Subject Taught, Experience, Certification, Preparation, Resignations, 

Source 160 

High School Equivalence 194 

Cost of Maryland Schools: 

Per Cent From Each Source 195 

Per Cent Distribution 198 

Cost per Pupil 202 

State Minimum Program 205 

Average Salary per Teacher and Principal 207 

Transportation 210 

School Lunch, Special Milk 212 

Capital Outlay, Value of School Property, Bonded Indebtedness 216 

Local Revenue, Assessed Valuation 220 

Federal Fund Expenditures 224 

Adult Education Expenditures 227 

Community College Enrollments 235 

Vocational Rehabilitation 236 

Maryland Public Libraries 240 

Financial Statements 242 

Pupils and Positions in Public and Nonpublic Schools 245 

Financial Tables 262 

Detailed Public High School Tables 284 

Index 301 

23 



January 1, 1966 



The Honorable J. Millard Tawes 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor Tawes: 

In accordance v^ith the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith the ninety-ninth 
"annual report covering all operations of the State Department 
of Education and the support, conditions, progress and needs of 
education throughout the State" for the period beginning July 
1, 1964, and ending June 30, 1965. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES A. SENSENBAUGH 

Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 
Baltimore, Maryland 



24 



Maryland State Department of Education 25 
1965 MARYLAND LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION* 

Regular Session 

Advisory Council for Higher Education 

Chapter 510, Senate Bill 385, amends Section 325(a) changing the limitation 
on the qualifications of persons for members on the Advisory Council 
for Higher Education, 

Apprenticeship 

Chapter 910, House Bill 1009, relates to the establishment and operation of 
programs for the training of apprentices and other on-the-job trainees. 

Barbers 

Chapter 722, House Bill 478, amends Article 43 generally revising the laws 
relating to the qualifications, registration, and examination of barbers 
and excluding certain counties from the provisions. 

Colleges 

Chapter 616, Senate Bill 586, repeals Section 319 eliminating certain exemp- 
tions in the law concerning fraudulent or substandard college degrees. 

Community Colleges 

Chapter 379, House Bill 245, amends Section 304(B) increasing the State's 
contribution for each full-time student at any community college. 

Community Colleges 

Chapter 511, Senate Bill 388, adds Section 300(1) authorizing the board of 
trustees of a community college to permit the use of its facilities in 
connection wth any program of secondary or vocational education ad- 
ministered by the board of education of the county or Baltimore City. 

Community Colleges 

Chapter 582, Senate Bill 419, adds Section 33A, amends Sections 301, 303, 
and 304, permitting the establishment of regional community colleges. 

County Superintendent of Schools 

Chapter 741, Senate Bill 233, amends Section 148(b) concerning the com- 
pensation of county superintendents of schools. 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 194, Senate Bill 254, amends Section 11(3) (1) of Article 73B 
correcting the laws as to the computation of pensions payable to mem- 
bers of the system. 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 479, Senate Bill 251, amends Section 13(1) of Article 73B increas- 
ing the percentage of funds that may be invested in common stocks. 



*A11 amendments revise Article 77, unless otherwise indicated. 



26 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 920, House Bill 137, amends Section 14(1) (e) of Article 73B allow- 
ing additional contributions by members subject to conditions and sav- 
ing provisions. 

Harford County Schools 

Chapter 368, House Bill 1200, amends Section 14 increasing the membership 
of the County Board of Education of Harford County and providing for 
the terms of office of the additional members. 

Higher Education Loan Corporation 

Chapter 115, Senate Bill 184, amends Sections 5, 6, and 7(a) of Article 43A 
concerning the powers and duties of the Maryland Higher Education 
Loan Corporation. 

Howard County Schools 

Chapter 521, Senate Bill 484, amends Section 49 increasing the travel and 
expense allowance of members of the Board of Education of Howard 
County. 



Kent County Schools 

Chapter 516, Senate Bill 441, amends Section 6(a) and adds Section 14A 
making special provisions for the membership and expense allowance 
for the county board of education. 



Medical Technicians Training 

Joint Resolution 38, H.J.R.-54, calls for the development of a plan and bud- 
get estimate for assumption by the State of part of the costs of nurse 
and medical technicians training. 



Scholarships 

Chapter 637, Senate Bill 667, adds Section 284J providing generally for the 
award of scholarships by the State Scholarship Board for the study of 
medicine. 



Scholarships 

Chapter 754, Senate Bill 278, revises and amends Article 7 revamping the 
State scholarship program. 



School Finance 

Chapter 623, Senate Bill 7, amends Section 220(a) concerning the State's 
share of current expenses in the public schools. 



State Bonds — Community Colleges 

Chapter 636, Senate Bill 634, amends Section 5(c) of Chapter 22 of 1962 
and Chapter 27 of 1964 changing the maximum amount of State funds 
available under the Community College Construction Loans of 1962 and 
1964 toward the total cost of construction of any community college 
project. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



State Colleges 

Chapter 431, House Bill 809, amends Section 165(e) providing that the quali- 
fications and tenure of the presidents of the State Colleges shall be 
solely within the discretion of the Board of Trustees of the State Colleges. 

State Superintendent of Schools 

Chapter 503, Senate Bill 232, amends Sections 40 and 75 concerning the 
powers of the State Superintendent of Schools with respect to remodel- 
ing or constructing school buildings. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 195, Senate Bill 255, amends Section 113(2) (e)(1) correcting the 
laws as to the computation of pensions payable to members of the system. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 481, Senate Bill 253, amends Section 112 permitting members of 
the Teachers' Retirement System to obtain service credit for service 
rendered by them under an emergency teaching certificate. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 614, Senate Bill 508, amends Section 113(8) (b) to provide for the 
option No. 2 benefit to the spouse. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 718, House Bill 136, amends Section 116(1) (d) allowing additional 
contributions by members subject to conditions and saving provisions. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 751, Senate Bill 250, amends Section 115(1) increasing the percent- 
age of total funds that may be invested in common stocks. 

Washington County Schools 

Chapter 209, House Bill 378, adds a new Section 63A authorizing the Board 
of Education of Washington County to permit private and parochial 
schools within the county to connect their facilities to the county's closed 
circuit educational television system. 

Washington County Schools 

Chapter 331, House Bill 409, amends Section 49 increasing the annual allow- 
ance of the members of the Washington County Board of Education. 



28 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE 
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 
July 1, 1964 

The State Superintendent of Schools called attention to a law 
passed by the 1964 General Assembly which requires pupils, 
faculty members, and visitors who work in or visit certain types 
of science laboratories and vocational shops to use protective 
eye devices as safety measures. The Assistant Attorney General 
had expressed concern regarding this law. He felt it was not 
complete enough for the local schools, and the superintendents 
felt it was not simple enough for interpretation. Dr. Sensen- 
baugh provided each of the Board members with a copy of 
Chapter 24 of the Laws of the State of Marj^land, 1964 Regu- 
lar Session (Senate Bill 76), and with a copy of the regulations 
governing the use and care of protective eye devices in the 
public schools of Maryland, which had been developed by a com- 
mittee representing the State Department of Education and the 
local school systems and approved by the school superintendents 
at their meeting on June 19, 1964. 

The State Board of Education then adopted Bylaw 561:1 — 
Regulations Governing the Use and Care of Protective Eye De- 
vices in the Public Schools of Maryland (Resolution No. 1964-27). 

Other action of the State Board included: 
Approved the appointment of Dr. Quentin L. Earhart as 
Assistant State Superintendent in Administration and Finance 
effective August 1, 1964. This position was held by Dr. Paul D. 
Cooper until July 1, 1964, when he resigned to become Director 
of the State Bureau of Fiscal Research. Prior to coming to the 
State Department, Dr. Earhart had been Assistant Superinten- 
dent of Instruction with the Baltimore County Public School 
System. 

Repealed and reenacted, with amendments Bylaw 312:2 — 
Principles and Standards : Public Secondary Education in Mary- 
land (Resolution No. 1964-26). This Bylaw provides that the 
standards for the organization, administration, and conduct of 
public high schools of the twenty-three counties of the State 
shall include those set forth in the document. Principles and 
Standards: Public Secondary Education in Maryland (196 If). 

August 26, 1964 

Members of the State Board were given a report on the 
War Orphans Educational Benefits Program. This program, in- 
stituted under Section 49, Article 96V2 of the Annotated Code 
of Maryand as an administrative responsibility of the State De- 
partment of Education, now provides up to $500 per year for 
a child of a veteran who died as a result of service with the 
armed forces of the United States and who was a resident of 
Maryland at the time of his induction into military service. The 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



award is for post-high school training and may be used at any 
institution approved by the State Department of Education. Re- 
cipients of these awards may attend institutions in or out of 
Maryland, and the grant may be used for such purposes as tui- 
tion, matriculation fees, board, room rent, books, and supplies. 

When a person is identified as being eligible for participa- 
tion in this program, he remains under its coverage until he 
reaches the age of twenty-four or until his educational program 
is completed, whichever comes first. If the individual receiving 
this award has served in the military service of the United 
States, the age limit is raised to twenty-seven. This Department 
reimburses expenses to the institution attended by the awardee 
upon receipt of properly authenticated invoices. 



Following is a summary of the program since its inception 



in 1954: 








School Year 


No. of Active Awards 


Total Amt. Paid 


Average Pymt. 


1954-55 


10 


$ 2,847.73 


$284.77 


1955-56 


16 


4,274.89 


267.18 


1956-57 


23 


6,213.20 


270.14 


1957-58 


26 


7,407.44 


284.90 


1958-59 


30 


8,408.49 


280.28 


1959-60 


711 


19,287.68 


271.66 


1960-61 


112 


31,146.64 


278.10 


1961-62 


179 


45,758.61 


277.98 


1962-63 


237 


106,401.73 


448.952 


1963-643 


2434 


102,279.29 


420.90 



iThe Veterans Administration began publicizing this program in 1960. 

2The maximum yearly amount per award was raised from $300 to $500. 

3 The federal government, by P. L. 88-361, has broadened the coverage 
provided by the Veterans Administration in its separate program of assist- 
ance to veterans' families. Previously, the V.A. provided assistance only to 
families of veterans who had died in or as a result of military service. The 
new law broadens V.A. coverage to include families of veterans who are 
partially or totally disabled in addition to the families of deceased personnel. 

4 The Maryland State Legislature in its 1964 session extended eligibility 
for veterans in the program to age twenty-seven. 

The Board was provided with information on the status of 
the proposed State-wide educational television system. It then 
approved Resolution No. 1964-29 which enunciates the State 
Board's position relative to the development of a State-wide sys- 
tem of educational television. Included in this Resolution, the 
State Board of Education authorized and directed the State 
Superintendent of Schools and the staff of the State Department 
of Education concerned with the development and uses of educa- 
tional television, in cooperation with the State Educational Tele- 
vision Advisory Committee and, where possible, with interested 
citizen groups such as the Maryland Council for Educational 
Television, to proceed on the basis of the position of the Board 
relative to educational television 



30 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



1. to request the Governor to include in his 1965-66 budget the 
necessary funds to implement the first step of the State-wide 
educational television system. The specific amount to be re- 
quested v^ill be reviev^ed for approval by the Board follow- 
ing consultations of the State Superintendent and his staff 
with the appropriate State officials and agencies, such as the 
State Planning Department, the Department of Budget and 
Procurement, the Department of Public Improvements, and 
the Board of Public Works. 

2. to inform members of the Legislature and seek their support 

3. to inform and invite the assistance and support of founda- 
tions, institutions, and interested individuals 

4. to inform and seek the support in this venture of the friends 
of education and the general public. 

The Board also authorized the State Superintendent of 
Schools to communicate further with the southern Regional Ed- 
ucation Board and other appropriate agencies with a view to- 
ward pursuing the course of action suggested in a letter from 
Dr. William L. Bowden concerning the possibilities of interstate 
cooperation in capital and operating costs of a broadcast tele- 
vision station. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-28 approving the State De- 
partment of Education budget requests for Headquarters, Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation, and Employment of the Handicapped in 
the amount of $5,021,728. 

Other action of the State Board included: 

Approved staff appointments which included: 

Ellwood F. Adams Appointed Educational Supervisor 



Walter F. Edwards From Assistant Supervisor to Su- 



John W. Powder, Jr. From Supervisor of Finance to 



of Manpower Training, effective 
July 6, 1964 



pervisor of School Lunch Pro- 
gram, effective June 3, 1964 



Irving W. Herrick 



Appointed Educational Supervisor 
of Industrial Arts, effective Sep- 
tember 1, 1964 



Chief, Division of Audits and 
Accounts, effective June 17, 1964 



Thomas E. Rowan 



Appointed Educational Supervisor 
of Mathematics, effective August 
26, 1964 



R. Kenneth Barnes 



Appointed Assistant State Superin- 
tendent of Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion, effective December 2, 1964 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



Mr. Barnes succeeded Mr. Robert C. Thompson who retired, 
effective December 31, 1964. In June, 1946, Mr. Barnes joined 
the Maryland State Department of Education as a vocational 
rehabilitation counselor. He served in this capacity until 1951 
when he became Director of Rehabilitation in the Maryland 
State Department of Mental Hygiene. In 1954 he became Direc- 
tor of Personnel for that department. After holding this posi- 
tion for one year he became Assistant Superintendent of Spring 
Grove Hospital in Catonsville. He held this position until 1960 
when he was appointed to his present position — Chief of the 
Division of Administration and Finance for the State Depart- 
ment of Mental Hygiene. 

October 7, 1964 

At the request of the State Superintendent of Schools, Mr. 
James L. Reid, Director of Vocational Education, outlined pos- 
sible solutions for the establishment of area vocational schools 
in three areas of the State which require consideration on other 
than a local county basis — Eastern Shore, Western Maryland, 
and Southern Maryland. 

Action of the State Board included: 

Adopted Bylaw 132:3 which permits professional staff mem- 
bers of the State Department of Education to pursue such grad- 
uate study during the regular school year and during summer 
sessions as may be necessary to qualify for higher degrees. The 
State Superintendent is authorized to approve the undertaking 
of such study and the administrative arrangements upon appli- 
cation by a staff member (Resolution No. 1964-34). 

Repealed Bylaw 432:1, Standards for Approval of Public 
and Nonpublic Evening High Schools. This bylaw had been su- 
perseded by Bylaw 312 :2, Section VI-H — Principles and Stand- 
ards: Public Secondary Education in Maryland (Resolution No. 
1964-35). 

Adopted Bylaw 750:2, Confidentiality of Pupil Records, 
which provides that individual pupil records maintained by 
teachers or other school personnel under the provisions of the 
Code of Bylaws are to be confidential in nature, and access to 
such records may be granted only for the purpose of serving 
legitimate and recognized educational ends. Individual pupil rec- 
ords, with the exception of such records as are designated as 
permanent, and with such other exceptions as provided by the 
law, should be destroyed when they are no longer able to serve 
such legitimate and recognized educational ends (Resolution 
No. 1964-36). 

Adopted Bylaw 750:3, Access of Parents to Pupil Records. 
This bylaw provides that all records of a pupil maintained un- 
der the provisions of the Code of Bylaws, including confidential 



32 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



records, shall be available to that pupil's parents or legal guard- 
ian in conference with appropriate school personnel. For pur- 
poses of this bylaw, the term "records" shall not include a 
teacher's personal notes which are not made available to any 
other person. (Resolution No. 1964-36). 

Adopted Bylaw 421 :2 which provides that a cooperative 
program shall be undertaken by the Division of Vocational Re- 
habilitation of the State Department of Education, in coopera- 
tion with the Department of Mental Hygiene of the State Board 
of Health and Mental Hygiene, for the purpose of developing 
improved rehabilitation services for mentally disabled citizens 
of Maryland, according to the "Agreement of Cooperation be- 
tween the State Board of Health and Mental Hygiene and the 
State Board of Education." (Resolution No. 1964-37). 

Repealed and reenacted Bylaw 924:1 which provides that 
the rules and regulations governing the approval of nonpublic 
tutoring schools shall include those set forth in the Maryland 
Standards for Nonpublic Schools - Tutoring Schools - 1964 (Res- 
olution No. 1964-38). These standards cover the following sub- 
jects : faculty, courses of study, pupil records, terminology, facil- 
ities and equipment, and certificates. 

November 25, 1964 

Dr. Sensenbaugh informed the Board that the Council of 
Chief State School Officers, at its meeting in New York City 
during the week of November 15, 1964, announced plans to se- 
cure a foundation grant in order to have an intensive study 
made of state departments of education, working jointly with 
the Maryland State Board of Education. It is hoped that a 
sourcebook on state departments of education will be prepared 
giving such information as how superintendents obtain their 
positions and how the state boards receive their appointments, 
and will include a study of central state staff organizations and 
the duties and functions of certain offices and positions. Dr. 
David W. Zimmerman will represent the Maryland State De- 
partment of Education in this project. 

Other action of the Board included: 

Voted to join the Maryland Association of Boards of Edu- 
cation on a limited membership basis, with no privilege to vote 
or hold office, and with the dues being paid as a part of Board 
expenses. 

Changed the structure of standing committees of the Board 
from six to three with two members of the Board assigned to 
each committee. Committees created were: (a) Instruction, Vo- 
cational Education, Library; (b) Research and Development, 
Federal-State Relations; (c) Finance and Administration, Ac- 
creditation and Certification, Vocational Rehabilitation. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



Approved a minimum salary scale for public library admin- 
istrators to be drafted into a proposed bill to be submitted to 
the General Assembly. This scale was based on recommendations 
of a special committee appointed in 1963 which first reported to 
the Board at its November, 1963, meeting. Their proposals with 
Department recommendations were later presented to library 
administrators and boards of library trustees. These groups re- 
quested the State Superintendent to seek to have the proposal 
introduced and enacted in the 1965 session of the General As- 
sembly. 

Approved the following staff changes: 

Richard K. McKay Appointed Acting Director of Divi- 
sion of Research and Develop- 
ment, effective January 13, 1965. 
Dr. McKay replaced Dr. Wesley 
N. Dorn who was granted a one- 
year leave of absence beginning 
November 17, 1964, as Director 
of the Maryland Advisory Coun- 
cil for Higher Education. 

Raymond I. Muller Appointed Supervisor of Instruc- 
tion (Research) effective Janu- 
ary 6, 1965. 

Approved the public education budget requests, exclusive of 
the Maryland State Teachers' Retirement System unit, in the 
amount of $156,627,319 for 1965-66 as follows: 



Headquarters $ 2,080,875 

Vocational Rehabilitation 2,922,812 

Aid to Education 149,859,151 

State Aided Educational Institutions 1,746,440 

Employment of the Handicapped 18,041 

Total $156,627,319 



Adopted Resolution No. 1964-40 which repealed and reen- 
acted Bylaw 322:1, State Plan for Vocational Education. It 
provides rules and regulations for carrying out the provisions 
of the federal laws relating to vocational education as set forth 
in Maryland State Plan for Vocational Education, November 
25, 1964. 

Adopted the following resolution (No. 1964-41) regarding 
Dr. Robert C. Thompson. 

WHEREAS, Dr. Robert C. Thompson, Assistant State Superin- 
tendent for Vocational Rehabilitation, will retire from the State De- 
partment of Education on December 1, 1964, after heading Maryland's 
vocational rehabilitation program for its disabled citizens for thirty-five 
years; and 



34 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



WHEREAS, During his career in State Service Dr. Thompson has 
made significant contributions to many aspects of Maryland's educa- 
tional program, including the organization of the special education pro- 
gram for handicapped school children and the improvement of proce- 
dures relating to school attendance; and 

WHEREAS, Dr. Thompson's contribution to vocational rehabilita- 
tion on the national scene has been outstanding through his active par- 
ticipation as a past president of the National Rehabilitation Association 
and on the state and local scene through his active work in the Mary- 
land Rehabilitation Association and his participation in the widely 
viewed television program, ''Comeback," which tells the story of the 
rehabilitated; and 

WHEREAS, Dr. Thompson has assumed a community leadership 
role as well as his educational leadership role by being an active par- 
ticipant in civic, fraternal, and church activities and organizations; and 

WHEREAS, The members of the State Board of Education will 
sincerely miss the educational contributions and valued friendship of 
Dr. Thompson; now. 

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That the State Board of Ed- 
ucation and the State Department of Education officially express to Dr. 
Robert C. Thompson, Assistant State Superintendent for Vocational 
Rehabilitation, their sincere appreciation for the invaluable service and 
leadership he has given to the vocational rehabilitation program for 
Maryland's citizens; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the State Board of Educa- 
tion and the State Department of Education wish Dr. Thompson much 
happiness and pleasure in future years. 

Dr. Sensenbaugh informed the Board that Mr. Charles L. 
Eby, President of the National Rehabilitation Association, has 
advised the State Department of Education that the recipient of 
the W. F. Faulkes Memorial Award for 1964 is Dr. R. C. Thomp- 
son. He added this is the highest award which is given by the 
National Rehabilitation Association. It was presented at the An- 
nual Conference Banquet at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Phil- 
adelphia on November 10, 1964. 

Adopted the following resolution on Maryland's policy con- 
cerning transfer and financial assistance of community-junior 
college students to State colleges: 

WHEREAS, The Board of Trustees of the Maryland State Col- 
leges, the Maryland Association of Junior Colleges, and the Maryland 
State Board of Education recognize their inter-relatedness in the pro- 
gram of higher education in the State of Maryland as set forth in the 
recommendations of the Report of the Commission for the Expansion 
of Public Higher Education in Maryland; and 

WHEREAS, The Board of Trustees of the Maryland State Col- 
leges, the Maryland Association of Junior Colleges, and the Maryland 
State Board of Education recognize their responsibility in aiding every 
Maryland student, both native and transfer, to proceed to his ultimate 
educational goal consistent with his ability; and 

WHEREAS, The Board of Trustees of the Maryland State Col- 
leges, the Maryland Association of Junior Colleges, and the Maryland 
State Board of Education recognize that there always will be reason for 
a certain number of students who can and should begin their college 
career at the four-year institution; and 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



WHEREAS, The Board of Trustees of the Maryland State Col- 
leges, the Maryland Association of Junior Colleges, and the Maryland 
State Board of Education recognize that in certain instances it may be 
in the best interest of all concerned for certain numbers of students to 
begin their baccalaureate program in a comprehensive two-year com- 
munity-junior college; and 

WHEREAS, The Board of Trustees of the Maryland State Colleges, 
the Maryland Association of Junior Colleges, and the Maryland State 
Board of Education recognize that the growing need for certain career- 
type programs of less than four years in duration can and should be 
provided by the two-year community- junior colleges; 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That every effort will be 
made to facilitate the transfer of students from the community-junior 
college of the State of Maryland to the State College. Liberal inter- 
pretation will be made of conflicting courses. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the Associate in Arts degree 
student who is a candidate for transfer to a State College will be given 
priority, assuming he meets the institution's requirement for date of 
application. Both the community-junior colleges and the State Colleges 
will discourage a student who is a potential transfer candidate from 
transferring before he has completed the Associate in Arts degree. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the Associate in Arts degree 
student will be given every consideration with respect to financial assist- 
ance, housing accommodations and other aid consistent with the gen- 
eral policies of the Board of Trustees of the State Colleges, and the 
policies of the particular institutions involved. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That, respecting the autonomy of 
the institutions involved, lines of communication should be kept open so 
as to minimize any difficulties that may arise in the transfer process. 
This implies a close relationship between and among the institutions 
and the departments or divisions involved. 

January 13, 1965 

At the request of the State Superintendent, Mrs. Grace A. 
Dorsey discussed Parts Two, Three, and Four of the Report of 
the State Committee to study the elementary school program — 
"Design for Planning the Program of the Elementaiy School." 
Part Two covered elementary programs in Music; Physical, 
Health and Safety Education; Science; and Social Studies; or- 
ganizing for learning ; staffing the elementary school ; providing 
an environment for effective learning; meeting varied special- 
ized needs of children; establishing effective school-community 
relationships ; and evaluating the elementary school. Implement- 
ing the elementary school program and looking ahead in elemen- 
tary education were covered by her discussion of Parts Three 
and Four of the Report. 

Endorsing proposed school legislation in principle, the 
Board requested the Deputy State Superintendent, Dr. David W. 
Zimmerman, to work with the Assistant Attorney General to 
prepare bills in the following areas: 

Increase the limitation for State support of Maryland stu- 
dents in State public community colleges from $225 to $300 per 
student and to provide free tuition for those public community 
college students preparing to teach. 



36 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



Establish regional junior colleges. 

Use by secondary schools of junior college facilities for vo- 
cational-technical and advanced programs. 

Amend statutes concerning school district trustees to in- 
dicate that it is optional for local school systems to have such 
trustees ; and w^here trustees are appointed their role v^ill be ad- 
visory to the local boards of education. 

Revise Section 44 of Article 77, Public School Lav^s of Mary- 
land, to increase from $300 to $5,000 the limitation requiring 
the State Superintendent's approval for remodeling or construc- 
tion of new school buildings. 

Revise Section 75 of Article 77, Public School Lav^s of 
Maryland, to increase from $1,000 to $5,000 the limitation for 
advertising for bids. 

At the request of the State Superintendent, Mr. Paul E. 
Huffington, Director of Instruction, presented to the Board the 
Maryland State Plan for Adult Basic Education Programs un- 
der Title II-B, Public Law 88-452. Under the provisions of this 
Title the Maryland State Board of Education has the responsi- 
bility for implementing the program. Dr. Geneva E. Flickinger, 
Supervisor of Adult Education, reported that there are approx- 
imately 196,000 adults who would qualify for the program since 
they do not have the equivalent of the fourth-grade level of 
school. 

The Board then adopted Bylaw 431:2, State Plan for Ad- 
ministering the Adult Basic Education Program under the Pro- 
visions of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 (Resolution 
No. 1965-1). The plan is essentially a contract between the 
State Board of Education and the United States Office of Edu- 
cation, stipulating the procedures for the expenditure of federal 
funds for adult basic education. It sets forth the basic adminis- 
trative policies, legal requirements for adult basic education, and 
qualifications of teachers and supervisors. The following major 
areas are covered: purpose of adult basic education. State plan 
administration, cooperative arrangements between the State De- 
partment of Education and other public and /or nonpublic agen- 
cies, programs of instruction, pilot projects. State technical and 
supervisory servces, and fiscal control and fund accounting pro- 
cedures. 

At the request of the Board, the Assistant Attorney Gen- 
eral reviewed the opinion of the Court of Appeals on an appeal 
made by the Board of Education of Montgomery County from an 
order of the Circuit Court for Montgomery County dismissing the 
Board's petition for a writ of mandamus against the Montgom- 
ery County Council. The Board's petition sought the following re- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



lief: (1) that the Council be directed to pay over to the Board all 
monies collected from the school tax levies and not appropriated 
at the end of the fiscal year 1962-63; (2) that the Council be 
directed to approve the Board's request for certain professional 
and clerical assistants; (3) that the Council be directed to fur- 
nish adequate reasons in writing for its refusal to approve cer- 
tain of the Board's requests in the 1963-64 annual budget; and 
(4) that the Council be directed to eliminate from the current 
school tax levy the item representing a tax for debt service. The 
Court ruled, concerning the unappropriated surplus, that the man- 
damus which the Board asks for the payment of the surplus to 
it must be granted. Any interest which has been earned is to be 
paid theron. As to professional and clerical assistants, the Leg- 
islature has provided that the Board's determination is binding 
upon the Council, and that the school levy must raise the neces- 
sary funds. As to reasons for amounts denied, the statute re- 
quires written reasons for such denial. The Council is not bound 
by representations by its staff on such a matter; it cannot dele- 
gate to its employees the performance of a duty which the Leg- 
islature has specifically provided shall be performed by the Coun- 
cil itself. As to the debt service tax, the inclusion of the debt 
service in the levy was proper. 

Other action of the State Board included : 

Approved staff changes in the State Department or Educa- 
tion which included: 

Gary Gray Appointed Educational Supervisor 

in the Division of Instruction, 
effective January 6, 1965. 

John R. Onder Appointed Supervisor of School 

Lunch Program, effective Febru- 
ary 1, 1965. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1965-2 which provides that the 
Board request the Governor make provision for approving the 
utilization of available federal funds for developing a total com- 
prehensive vocational rehabilitation plan for Maryland, one 
chapter of which shall include a study of the need for and rec- 
ommendations regarding a comprehensive Vocational Rehabili- 
tation center. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1965-3 which recommends that the 
Governor designate the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation as 
the Agency authorized to establish a counseling, evaluation, and 
referral service at each Selective Service Station in the State. 

This action was taken at the request of President Lyndon B. 
Johnson who had requested the Governor of Maryland to desig- 
nate a state agency to coordinate a counseling, evaluation, and 
referral service for youths who by reason of mental or physical 
disabilities are disqualified for duty in the armed services. 



38 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



Adopted Resolution No. 1965-4 which requests funds in the 
1965-66 capital and operating budgets to implement the first 
step of the proposed State-wide ETV system. 

Repealed and reenacted Bylaw 322:1, State Plan for Voca- 
tional Education (Resolution No. 1965-5). This plan is essenti- 
ally a contract between the State Board of Education and the 
United States Office of Education, stipulating the procedures for 
the expenditure of federal vocational funds in Maryland. It sets 
forth the basic administrative policies, the legal requirements 
for vocational education, and the qualifications for teachers and 
supervisors. The following major areas are covered: adminis- 
tration and supervision ; State fiscal and accounting procedures ; 
program of instruction ; vocational guidance and counseling serv- 
ices; program of teacher training; research, demonstration, and 
experimental programs; construction; work study; vocational 
education program fields (agriculture, distributive education, 
fisheries occupations, health occupations, home economics, busi- 
ness and office occupations, technical education, trades and indus- 
try, other cooperative programs) ; interrelationships among pro- 
gram fields. 

February 24, 1965 

At the request of the President of the State Board, the As- 
sistant Attorney General stated that the question in the case of 
the Board of Education of Anne Arundel County versus the 
County Commissioners of Anne Arundel County was whether the 
County Commissioners have the power to reduce a school bud- 
get submitted by the County Board of Education, and the spe- 
cific reduction in this case was $760,000. The reductions fall into 
five categories: (1) positions of professional and clerical per- 
sonnel — the Court ruled that this was an improper reduction; 
(2) supplies for the office of the County Superintendent — the 
Court ruled that this was an improper reduction; (3) teachers' 
salaries — the Court ruled that it is within the discretion of the 
County Commissioners to make this reduction; (4) County cele- 
brations — the Court ruled that this reduction appears justified; 
and (5) books and materials of instruction — the Court ruled the 
County Commissioners have the right to reduce these items. The 
Court also ruled that a reduction relating to the transportation 
of nonpublic school children is improper. The Assistant Attor- 
ney General stated he had not heard of an appeal taken in this 
case. 

Action of the State Board included: 

Adopted Resolution No. 1965-7 which includes the repeal 
of Bylaw 310:1 and repeal and re-enactment of Bylaws 311:1 
and 312:1. Bylaw 311 :1 provides that the policies for the organ- 
ization, administration, and conduct of public elementary schools 
shall include those set forth in Design for Planning the Program 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



of the Elementary School (1964). This publication sets forth 
both broad and specific policies for the organization, adminis- 
tration, and conduct of a successful public elementary school 
program. It discusses the bases for planning the program, in 
terms of the philosophy and goals of the elementary school and 
the factors influencing elementary education, and sets forth some 
basic considerations in planning the program in various curric- 
ulum areas. It also discusses methods for the implementation of 
the program, including such matters as organization and staff- 
ing, environment, specialized pupil needs, school-community re- 
lationships, and factors of evaluation. The document concludes 
with a brief treatment of some of the more important emerging 
trends in elementary education. Bylav^ 312:2 provides that the 
general policies for public secondary school instruction shall in- 
clude those set forth in Policies and Programs: Public Secon- 
dary Education in Maryland (Maryland School Bulletin, Vol. 
XXXIX, No. 3, April, 1963). This bulletin sets forth desirable 
elements for a successful public secondary school program of 
instruction. The public secondary school is placed in its histor- 
ical perspective, and its underlying philosophy and goals are ex- 
plored. The bulletin then treats the leadership and organiza- 
tional aspects of the program. The distinctive aspects of jun- 
ior and senior high schools are treated briefly. Considerable at- 
tention is devoted to the policies of public secondary school in- 
struction in each of several curriculum areas. Finally, instruc- 
tion as a learning process is treated, follov^ed by a brief state- 
ment in regard to pupil services and program and pupil evalu- 
ation. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1965-8 which provides that the 
State Board of Education approve a request to the Federal Vo- 
cational Rehabilitation Administration for funds to conduct a 
selected demonstration project showing systematic teaching of 
mobility to blind high school students and other recently blinded 
persons in Prince Georges and Montgomery counties. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1965-10 which provides that the 
Maryland State Board of Education urge the Advisory Board 
of Higher Education to give priority in its considerations to the 
problems of extending present graduate programs and offering 
new ones in the colleges and universities of the State. These are 
the chief institutions where teachers of the State take programs 
of studies in post-baccalaureate programs. 

Appointed George E. Klinkhamer as Educational Supervisor 
of Special Education, effective July 1, 1965. 

Approved the revised State plan to implement amendments 
to the National Defense Education Act of 1958 to include his- 
tory, civics, geography, English, and reading. Originally the Act 
covered science, mathematics, and modern foreign languages 
only. (Resolution No. 1965-14). 



40 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



Approved Resolution No. 1965-15 which provides that the 
State Board of Education hereby agrees that it will comply with 
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (P.L. 88-352) and all 
requirements imposed by or pursuant to the regulations of the 
Department of Health, Education and Welfare issued pursuant 
to that title, to the end that no person shall, on the ground of 
race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation 
in, be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to dis- 
crimination under any program of activity for which the appli- 
cant receives Federal financial assistance from the Department; 
and hereby gives assurance that it will immediately take any 
measure to effectuate this agreement. 

Endorsed in principle the use of State funds to help pay for 
kindergartens in Maryland. This action related to proposed leg- 
islation on this subject being sponsored by the Maryland Con- 
gress of Parent Teacher Associations. 

Endorsed House Bill 340 to provide duty-free lunch periods 
for teachers as introduced under the sponsorship of the Mary- 
land State Teachers Association, in the 1965 General Assembly. 

April 14, 1965 

The Board approved the following resolution on the centen- 
nial of the American Association of School Administrators: 

WHEREAS, The American Association of School Administrators 
has served the American people through the promotion and improve- 
ment of education for one hundred years; and 

WHEREAS, The school administrators of the State of Maryland 
played an important role in the organization of this Association in Har- 
risburg, Pennsylvania, on August 17, 1865; and 

WHEREAS, The first Secretary of the Association was The Rev- 
erend Libertus VanBokkelen, LL.D., State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction; and 

WHEREAS, The school administrators of the State of Maryland 
have continued through the years to alert the public to the necessity 
for appropriate educational programs to move ahead with the changing 
society; and 

WHEREAS, The Maryland State Board of Education has main- 
tained and elevated the professional and ethical standards of the teach- 
ing profession in general and its administrative and supervisory serv- 
ice in particular in its effort to achieve the goals set by the American 
Association of School Administrators; 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That the Maryland 
State Board of Education applaud the leadership of the school admin- 
istrators in making and implementing school policies which are consis- 
tent with sound educational practices; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the Maryland State Board of 
Education commends the American Association of School Administra- 
tors for its vital role in achieving a unified professional strength for 
the improvement of education. 

Action of the State Board included: 

Authorized the State Superintendent of Schools on behalf 
of the State Board to expend contributions by private organi- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



zations or individuals for meeting the State's share for estab- 
lishing and operating rehabilitation facilities and workshops. 
This action was in accordance with statutory authority to accept 
funds from private sources. (Resolution No. 195-19). Following 
this action the Board approved a project to extend and improve 
Vocational Rehabilitation Services in cooperation with the 
Jeanne Bussard Training Workshop in Frederick, Maryland. 
(Resolution No. 1965-20). In explaining this program, Mr. R. 
Kenneth Barnes, Assistant State Superintendent in Vocational 
Rehabilitation, stated that the Frederick County Association for 
Retarded Children had taken steps to start a sheltered work- 
shop to evaluate, train, and employ mentally retarded young 
adults in Frederick County. The major operation will center 
around subcontract work which will be obtained in the com- 
munity and will include such things as collating, subassembly, 
and light manufacturing. In order to get the evaluation and 
training phases of this program in operation, it will be neces- 
sary for the Jeanne Bussard Training Workshop to obtain ad- 
ditional financing with which to purchase certain equipment. 
The Workshop will also be dependent upon the sponsorship of 
individual clients in evaluation and training by the Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation. As approved by the State Board of 
Education the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation will accept 
a contribution from the Frederick County Association for Re- 
tarded Children which will be used to match Federal Vocational 
Rehabilitation funds. 

Authorized the Mount Providence Junior College to confer 
Associate in Arts degrees commencing in August, 1965. (Reso- 
lution No. 1965-23). 

May 26, 1965 

In the annual election of officers of the State Board of Edu- 
cation, Mr. Jerome Frampton, Jr., and Mr. William L. Wilson 
were re-elected president and vice president, respectively. 

At the request of the State Superintendent, Dr. Richard K. 
McKay, Acting Director of Research and Development, stated 
that on April 20, 1965, the State Superintendent of Schools ap- 
pointed a State Committee on Pupil Data Systems to review all 
items of information and forms used in the present system of 
pupil data. The Committee will develop recommendations con- 
cerning pupil information which is to be collected and the rede- 
signing of forms to provide for greater use of automatic data 
processing. One of the outcomes of the Committee's work will 
be a Pupil Accounting Handbook to serve as a guide in the de- 
velopment of systems of pupil data throughout the State. Mr. 
Maxwell Burdette of Montgomery County has accepted the Chair- 
manship of the Committee which will involve as members and 
consultants representatives of all the divisions of the Depart- 



42 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



ment and all of the local school systems. With improved and 
promptly-supplied data on pupils in hand, teachers, counselors, 
administrators, and others can do a better job of providing the 
appropriate instruction for each child and adult in Maryland 
public schools. 

At the request of the State Superintendent, Dr. Harold 
D. Reese stated that guidelines and procedures had been pre- 
pared for establishing a regional community college. It is hoped 
that these guidelines w^ill enable the State Department of Edu- 
cation to proceed in establishing regional colleges on the Eastern 
Shore. 

Other action of the State Board included: 

Granted approval to Morgan College to introduce certain 
graduate programs v^ith authorization to confer Master's de- 
grees in these programs. (Resolution No. 1965-25) 

Approved a revised contract v^ith the Enoch Pratt Free 
Library, the City of Baltimore, and the State Department of 
Education to provide for the installation and use of a teletype 
communications network to facilitate borrowing circulating ma- 
terials and using certain reference services throughout the State 
of Maryland by certain authorized agencies and individuals. 
These include authorized public libraries, State-supported hospi- 
tal and correctional institutions, and individuals in certain cases 
as defined by mutual agreement between the Pratt Library and 
the State Department of Education. 

Approved Staff changes in the State Department of Educa- 
tion which included: 

Betty M. Franklin Appointed Educational Supervisor 



of Accreditation, effective Aug- 
ust 1, 1965 



Allan Gaddis 



Appointed Educational Supervisor 



of Business and Office Educa- 



tion, effective July 1, 1965 



Billy B. Reeves 



Appointed Supervisor of School 



Plant Planning, effective July 1, 



1965 



Gilbert Schiffman 



Appointed Educational Supervisor 
of Reading, effective July 1, 1965 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



division of instruction 
General Elementary School Supervision 

The activities of the two general State supervisors of ele- 
mentary schools were related closely to the work of the previous 
year. Curriculum revision in the local schools systems continued 
to be one of the major tasks with emphases on social studies, 
language arts, and science. Close cooperation of the general su- 
pervisors and the special supervisor of science has resulted in a 
more stimulating program in that area. There continues to be a 
need for other special subject supervisors in the State Depart- 
ment of Education, especially in music, social studies, art, and 
language arts. 

There were, however, several specific activities which have 
implications for the future and which seem to indicate impor- 
tant emphases in the present and the years ahead. 

Greater Emphasis on Early Childhood Education 

During the latter part of this school year the federal gov- 
ernment instituted the Head Start program for preschool chil- 
dren. Twenty-three of the local school systems developed pro- 
grams which were enthusiastically received by the public. Teach- 
ers, administrators, and supervisors of elementary schools were 
actively involved. This program along with new research on the 
importance of early childhood activities has already done much 
to alert the school systems to the need for early childhood edu- 
cation in the public schools. The elementary supervisors kept in- 
formed of the progress of the Head Start programs, visited 
teacher-training workshops, and helped in developing some of 
the programs. 

More responsibility, however, was directed toward the es- 
tablishment of summer catch-up programs for disadvantaged 
children and youth in schools in fifteen of the local school sys- 
tems. This, too, was a federally-financed program and included 
activities in the areas of enrichment and remedial instruction, 
recreation, and health. The supervisor of elementary schools for 
the western part of the State assumed responsibility for the 
total State in this program. 

Both supervisors devoted time to working with PTA and 
lay educational groups as they became increasingly interested in 
kindergartens in the public schools. Free kindergartens are at 
the present time a part of the school system in Baltimore City 
and Montgomery county. Several other systems have kindergar- 
tens supervised by the local school systems but paid in part by 
the parents of the children attending. 

Several of the local school systems are giving particular at- 
tention to the development of oral language skills in their pro- 
grams for young children. Pilot studies with disadvantaged chil- 



44 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



dren, stressing oral communication and emphasis on the experi- 
ence approach to the teaching of reading in the early grades, are 
examples of this interest. 

The Impact of Federal Legislation 

The involvement of the federal government in the educa- 
tional program has brought new and different types of activ- 
ities. The elementary supervisors have been engaged in the ex- 
panded NDEA programs this year in assisting in the writing of 
State guidelines and in the approval of elementary school proj- 
ects in reading, English, and social studies. These areas will have 
more and better materials of instruction as projects are im- 
proved and more personnel are employed to implement the pro- 
grams. 

Initiation of Newer Programs 

Considerable time was devoted to the evaluation of newer 
programs in the local systems, some of which seem to have 
doubtful value while others are promising and stimulating. In- 
cluded were programs in reading — using the initial teaching 
alphabet of 43 symbols, the experience approach for beginning 
reading and individualized procedures in both primary and up- 
per grades ; various plans for providing guidance in the elemen- 
tary schools (see IRCOPPS projects in the report of Pupil Per- 
sonnel Services) ; use of different content in the social studies, 
stressing the development of concepts in economics; new pro- 
grams in science organized on a conceptual structure; and dif- 
ferent plans for organizing children for learning — team teach- 
ing, use of resource teachers, ungraded classes and departmen- 
talization, supplementing or replacing the self-contained class- 
room. 

State Conferences 

The annual Maryland Conference on Elementary Education 
for supervisors and principals of elementary schools had as its 
theme this year, ''Meeting the Challenge of Change." Speakers 
at the general sessions were Dr. Frank T. Rafferty, Director, 
Child Psychiatry Service, University Hospital in Baltimore, 
who spoke on 'The Impact of Our Changing Culture on Chil- 
dren'*; Miss Anne S. Hoppock, Director of Elementary Educa- 
tion in the New Jersey State Department of Education, whose 
address was entitled, "Strategy for Making Changes in the 
School Program"; Dr. Ray L. Birdwhistell, Department of Psy- 
chiatry at Temple University Medical Center, who discussed 
"Change — Threat or Promise"; and Dr. James A. Sensenbaugh, 
the new State Superintendent of Schools, who presented his 
ideas concerning "Meeting the Challenge of Change." 

Assemblies at the Conference had as speakers Dr. H. Ger- 
thon Morgan from the University of Maryland on "Mental 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



Health in the Classroom" ; Dr. Jeanne L. Noble from New York 
University on ''Widening Cultural Opportunities for Children"; 
Dr. James D. Raths from the University of Maryland on ''Help- 
ing Children Develop Values" ; and Dr. Mary Spencer from the 
Maiden Public Schools in Massachusetts on "Meeting Health 
Needs of Children." 

Cooperative Project in Planning Elementary Schools 

Among educators in Maryland there was an increased in- 
terest in the problems involved in planned changes that were 
resulting from rapidly growing communities, new technology, 
and newer communication media. Indicative of this was the co- 
operative project undertaken by the Howard County Board of 
Education and the State Department of Education to make a 
study of the desired programs and needed facilities for the 
schools to serve the proposed new community, Columbia. Study 
committees were appointed to work on plans for a dynamic, for- 
ward-looking school program that will grow and change with the 
developing community. One of the State supervisors of elemen- 
tary schools served as a member of the Steering Committee and 
was actively involved in discussions, visitations to outstanding 
school^ systems outside of the State, and in the formulation of 
tentative plans for the elementary schools. 

Conservation Education 

One of the State supervisors of elementary schools contin- 
ued to cooperate with other State agencies interested in conser- 
vation by attending meetings and actively participating in the 
programs of the Maryland State Soil Conservation Committee 
and Conservation Education Council. She assisted in the plan- 
ning of the Southern Maryland Tour for Teachers conducted 
during Maryland Land Week. 

General Adult Education 

General adult education continued to expand during 1964- 
65. Art, foreign languages, modern mathematics, and high school 
academic subjects were the most frequent offerings, with secon- 
dary education attracting the most adults. 

In March the State Superintendent of Schools devoted part 
of a meeting with local superintendents to a discussion of gen- 
eral adult education with emphasis on the program needs in 
Maryland. 

^ During the year, preparations were made to offer adult 
basic education under Title H-B of the Economic Opportunity 
Act of 1964. A State-wide Committee assisted the State Super- 
visor of Adult Education in canvassing the needs and discussing 
possible programs. A State Plan was written, accepted by the 
State Board of Education, and approved by the U.S. Commis- 



46 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



sioner of Education. Finally, supervisors responsible for adult 
education in local school systems attended a spring meeting at 
which the potentialities for Maryland were discussed. Two school 
systems initiated programs in fiscal 1965. 

Civil Defense Education 

The Civil Defense Adult Education Program completed its 
third year of operation. The program is a joint federal-State 
project with the federal government providing 100 percent of 
the financing. 

For the year, 2,031 students completed the personal and 
family survival course in fifty-five different courses throughout 
the State. Two classes were held to train teachers for the pro- 
gram and eleven teachers were trained. Twelve visits were made 
to county homemaker clubs to promote the CDAE course. One 
class resulted from these visits. 

The coordinator taught the following : a class of 4-H young- 
sters during their annual workshop at the University of Mary- 
land ; a pilot class of physical education students in Anne Arun- 
del County; and class of State Office Building employees. 

Working with the Director of Training for the State Penal 
Institutions resulted in nineteen classes of the personal and fam- 
ily survival course. 

St. Mary's County was the first county in the State to use 
the CDAE program as part of its high school curriculum. The 
course was taught to high school seniors in the social studies 
curriculum. 

Groundwork was laid during the year for a summer train- 
ing program at Andrews Air Force Base. This will bring the 
largest number of students into the course since the program's 
inception in Maryland. 

Curriculum Development Activities 

The two supervisors of curriculum served the school sys- 
tems in many ways during the school year, 1964-65. The work 
performed may be grouped into several main areas: (1) Work 
on curriculum development for individual schools and county- 
wide programs; (2) direction in the operation of the State Cur- 
riculum Center; (3) inservice education; (4) special institutes 
and conferences; (5) school evaluation programs. 

Curriculum Development 

Requests came from a number of county supervisors and 
school principals for service all over the State. Many days were 
spent in the field. The time was utilized in helping to plan cur- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



riculum workshops and conferences, evaluating curriculum ma- 
terials for use in the various subject areas and participating in 
the actual conduct of the sessions. A curriculum supervisor 
served as consultant in many situations and in others assisted 
in securing out-of-state consultants for specific purposes on the 
programs. Assistance v^as given school faculties in Calvert, Ce- 
cil, Charles, Dorchester, and Talbot counties in developing sub- 
ject outlines for the various subjects. 

One of the Supervisors served on a committee to work out 
State plans for the amended NDEA Title III Act. She was 
partially responsible for approving local projects in history, 
geography, and civics. Major goals and specific activities were 
worked out for the improvement of instruction in history, geog- 
raphy, and civics for the oncoming year. 

State Curriculum Center 

A three-day Annual Audiovisual Preview for the evaluation 
of films, filmstrips, and recordings was held. Representatives 
from the counties and Baltimore City and the teacher education 
institutions in Maryland attended. By means of this cooperative 
evaluation, materials were purchased for the Curriculum Center. 

All of the curriculum materials sent to the Department were 
evaluated before being forwarded to the Curriculum Center. 

The following lists and/or publications were prepared: 

1. The 1964 Supplement to the 1961 Audiovisual Catalog. 
This gives an annotated description of materials pur- 
chased for the Center. 

2. "Printed Curriculum Materials, 1965," the first supple- 
ment to "Printed Curriculum Materials, 1955-1962." 
This list contains the bulletins and yearbooks produced 
by school systems, state departments of education, col- 
leges, and agencies in Maryland and in other states. 

3. The educational level and prices of curriculum materials 
which had been produced by the local school systems 
during the year ending May 31, 1965. 

4. New audiovisual materials obtained in 1965 for the State 
Curriculum Center. 

Training For Professional Growth 

Assistance was given in directing programs for the inserv- 
ice education of principals, teachers, and other local staff mem- 
bers, the central purpose being to improve instruction. These 
meetings were marked by their variety and number during the 
year. Aid was given in securing speakers and also in helping 
with the demonstration lessons. In many cases help was given 
individual school faculties in their efforts to upgrade instruc- 



48 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



tion. Here community resource people and people from the State 
colleges, NEA, and the United States Office of Education were 
called upon. 

Special Institutes 

One of the supervisors worked with several local groups 
and State colleges in planning and conducting institutes for 
teachers. They include the Southern Maryland Reading Council 
and Anne Arundel County Reading Council. Each of these 
groups conducted several special institutes. The supervisor also 
served at Morgan State College in the regular summer science 
workshop and the NSF Institute. Several days were spent work- 
ing with the training school staff at Montrose School, Boys' Vil- 
lage School, and the Education Department at Patuxent Insti- 
tute. 

The State Coordinating Curriculum Committee was chaired 
by one of the curriculum supervisors. The Committee met to 
evaluate instructional materials for the 1965 List I and List II 
and to discuss policies for their distribution. Following their 
printing, the Lists and the Annotated List of New Materials 
were sent to the local school systems, colleges, and public libra- 
ries in Maryland. 

Work was continued with The Baltimore Sunpapers in sup- 
plying the twenty-three county boards of education with free 
monthly prints of the news film ''Screen News Digest"; also 
work continued with the Baltimore News AmericoM which sup- 
plies the junior and senior high schools of Anne Arundel, Bal- 
timore, Harford, Howard Counties and Baltimore City with free 
monthly current affairs filmstrips. 

Assistance was given to the Music Committee in planning 
the Maryland Conference of Supervisors of Music held April 7, 
1965, at the Emerson Hotel, Baltimore. 

School Evaluation 

School evaluation was given serious concern in a number 
of high and elementary schools during the year. The supervisor 
vv^orked with high schools in Calvert, St. TTary's, Talbot, and Wor- 
cester counties. These schools were preparing for evaluation by 
the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 
The supervisor worked throughout the year with other types of 
less formalized evaluation. The Boston Elementary Evaluative 
Criteria were used in evaluation programs in Calvert, Cecil, 
Charles, and Somerset counties. Schools were visited in these 
counties by State-wide committees according to a plan similar 
to that used by the Middle States Association. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



Health and Physical Education 

School Health Program 

The Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 
served with Dr. John L. Pitts of the Maryland State Depart- 
ment of Health as co-chairmen of the Maryland State School 
Health Council. Two important actions taken by the Council 
were: 1) to restructure the Council to insure maximum effec- 
tiveness in achieving participation of and coordination between 
health and education departments and 2) to assure that Dr. Gil- 
bert Schiffman's Committee on Early Identification of Readng 
Problems would not be dissolved until a set of bylaws for the 
Council had been formulated by a study Committee and pre- 
sented to the Council. The co-chairmen were authorized to es- 
tablish an interdisciplinary committee for this task. 

On behalf of the Council the co-chairmen appointed an in- 
terdisciplinary committee to study the joint role and responsibil- 
ities of health and education departments in combating health 
hazards of cigarette smoking as reported by the Surgeon Gen- 
eral. When the committee assembled, it designated itself as the 
Maryland Committee on Smoking and Health with Dr. Kay Ed- 
wards, Chief, Division of Adult Health Services, Maryland State 
Department of Health, as Chairman. The Committee decided that 
its first effort should be concentrated on children in grades 5 
and 6. A resource teaching unit was developed by a subcom- 
mittee and a packet of materials was assembled for distribution 
to schools in Maryland. The State voluntary health agencies gave 
much assistance in providing the materials for the kit. A State- 
wide Conference on Smoking and Health was planned by the 
Committee to be sponsored jointly by the Departments of Health 
and Education and the three voluntary health agencies. About 
100 people attended the Conference. Informed speakers moti- 
vated them to conduct effective educational programs for 5th and 
6th graders, emphasizing health hazards of cigarette smoking. 
About 3,000 educational kits were distributed for local use. 

In keeping with repeated recommendations of the Council, 
the State Department of Education stressed the importance of 
upgrading programs in health education. As a result of a meet- 
ing early in the school year, it was decided that at both the 
annual Maryland Conference on Secondary Education and the 
Maryland Conference on Elementary Education, special atten- 
tion would be given to the urgency for school instructional pro- 
grams designed to meet physical and mental health problems. 
At the Conference on Secondary Education, Dr. George James, 
Commissioner of Health for New York City, spoke on "Health 
for Youth of Today and Tomorrow." 



50 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



School Physical Education Programs 

The Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation was 
invited to participate in vv^orkshops and conferences in nine coun- 
ties and to talk to administration classes at the University of 
Maryland, Morgan State College, and Coppin State College. 

The Maryland Association for Health, Physical Education, 
and Recreation held an all-day conference at Dulaney Senior 
High School during the Maryland State Teachers Association 
Convention. Approximately 1,100 teachers and administrators 
were in attendance. The Association also held a conference at 
Annapolis in which the Delaware and the Washington, D.C., 
health, physical education, and recreation associations cooper- 
ated and participated. This '*Tri-State Conference" will be re- 
peated annually in the future, and the site will be alternated in 
the three geographical areas. 

Gymnastics continued to receive more and more interest and 
have become a large part of the physical education program dur- 
ing the winter months. Counties and groups of counties are con- 
tinuing to sponsor clinics for the teachers to improve their skills 
in teaching gymnastics. 

Physical Fitness 

The AAHPER Youth Fitness Test, which consists of seven 
items, was again administered to 5th, 8th, and 11th graders in 
all school sysems, including Baltimore City. Excellent response 
was received, reflecting a sincere interest by parents in the phy- 
sical fitness of their children. The Physical Fitness Report to 
Parents, which is a form sent to parents after the test is ad- 
ministered to the child, proved very successful as a technique 
in gaining parents' interest. 

New Market Elementary School in Frederick County was 
established as an official Demonstration Center under the State 
Department of Education and the President's Council on Physi- 
cal Fitness. The school received visitors from in and out of 
State to observe the operation of the model program. 

Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association 

The State Supervisor is responsible for the administration 
of the MPSSAA. The 1964 State Cross Country Meet was held 
for the first time at Western Maryland College where approxi- 
mately 750 boys competed in 8 different races over a 21/2 ^ile 
course on the campus. A District Soccer Tournament was held 
in each of the five districts of the Association. 

State-wide clinics for wrestling coaches and cheerleaders 
were also sponsored by the Association in the fall of 1964 as 
well as a clinic for football coaches in the spring of 1965. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



51 



In the spring of 1965, 17 District Meets were sponsored at 
which boys qualified to participate at the State level. The State 
Meets were organized for Class AA and A schools to participate 
in one, and Class B and C schools in another. Both were held on 
the same day. However, a new trend seems to be emerging for 
each class of school to have a separate State Meet. Plans are to 
attempt to do this, possibly in 1966. 

School Outdoor Education Programs 

Carroll and Cecil county school systems launched outdoor 
education programs for 6th graders. Carroll County's program 
is conducted in a camp situation five days a week. The Cecil 
County program is of the nonresident type in which the chil- 
dren are taken on one-day field trips over a period of six con- 
secutive weeks. Instruction is given in 12 different subject areas. 

It is estimated that a total of 5,118 elementary school pu- 
pils experienced outdoor education in resident camp sites. In- 
volved with the programs were 190 classroom teachers and 365 
high school students who served as counselors. While growth in 
outdoor education has been encouraging, there are still many 
children who are not receiving much association with the great 
outdoors. Not all outdoor education need be associated with 
camp locations. Field trips of short duration are being taken in 
many parts of the State, and this means of learning can and 
should be extended considerably. It is hoped that school sys- 
tems will take opportunities provided through Title I of the Ele- 
mentary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 either to inaug- 
urate or extend their outdoor education programs. 

State and National Groups and Conferences 

In addition to his regular professional duties, the State Su- 
pervisor of Physical Education and Recreation served in the ca- 
pacity of Past-President of the Society of State Directors of 
Health, Physical Education and Recreation, and also on the So- 
ciety's Committee on Legsilation to bring about desirable consid- 
eration and inclusion of health, physical education, and recrea- 
tion areas to benefit from the various titles of the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act of 1965. 

He also served as liaison person between the State Depart- 
ment of Education and the Maryland Commission on Physical 
Fitness, as a member, starting a three-year term; on the Balti- 
more County Health and Welfare Council; on the Governor's 
Maryland Committee on Firearms Safety to make recommenda- 
tions to the State Legislature; and on the Metropolitan Y.M.C.A. 
Camps Committee. 



52 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



Foreign Languages 

During the school year 1964-65 the State Supervisor of For- 
eign Languages working under Title III of the National Defense 
Education Act continued administration of the equipment ac- 
quisition program and supervision in the area of modern foreign 
languages. 

Assistance v^as provided to local school systems in the de- 
velopment of projects requesting language laboratory equipment 
and supplementary teaching aids. These projects were then eval- 
uated and processed at the State level to insure effective use of 
federal matching funds. 

Throughout the year supervisory and consultant services 
were available to local school systems. Continuous contact was 
maintained with them and visits provided opportunities for 
conferences, planning sessions, and participation in activities 
directed toward the improvement of modern foreign language 
education. 

State -local sponsored workshops and inservice programs 
helped teachers become more familiar with new content and 
methods in teaching modern foreign languages and with oppor- 
tunities for participation in NDEA Foreign Language Institutes. 
The State Supervisor participated in many meetings held by the 
local school systems. 

State services included a two -week workshop to train new 
secondary school teachers, a two-week workshop to train spe- 
cialists for TV follow-up, and a four-week production workshop 
to revise and expand a former State bulletin. Selected Filmed 
Materials for French, Spanish, and German Classes. 

The State Supervisor aided two counties in planning for a 
six-week and a four-and-one-half week curriculum workshop in 
which she also furnished consultant help. 

Several conferences of all the foreign language supervisors 
in the State were held to share ideas and to plan specific ways 
in which the Maryland State Department of Education could 
best help local foreign language instruction. The supervisor also 
continued to work with the State colleges and universities on 
common language problems. 

The State Supervisor of Foreign Languages has also been 
actively engaged in regional and national programs concerned 
with improving modern foreign language education. She has 
worked with the Modern Language Association, serving as a 
member of a team which evaluated NDEA Summer Language 
Institutes, lectured at the University of Maine, was a speaker at 
the American Association of Teachers of German, participated 
on the panel, "Meet the Experts," for the American Association 
of School Administrators, served as chairman for a general 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



session at the Southern Conference on the Teaching of Foreign 
Languages, and was consultant for secondary school teachers of 
French at the Southern Conference. The Supervisor served with 
two colleagues in evaluating the Indiana Language Program for 
the Ford Foundation. 

The Supervisor serves as a member of a National Advisory- 
Board of the Modern Language Program {Parlous Francais) , is 
active in the Northeast Conference on the Teaching of Foreign 
Languages, is a member of the National Council of State Super- 
visors of Foreign Languages, and continues to serve as chair- 
man of the Interim Board of Directors of the Department of 
Foreign Languages of the National Education Association. The 
State Supervisor also serves as an ex officio member of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the Maryland Modern Language Associa- 
tion and she edits the Maryland Newsletter. 

Mathematics 

Much of the first year of the newly created position of Su- 
pervisor of Mathematics was occupied with the task of becoming 
familiar with the job and the ongoing activities. Prior to this 
school year, the State Supervisor of High Schools was responsi- 
ble for both science and mathematics. He had begun many activ- 
ities which were to be continued by the new Supervisor. 

Services to the State Agency 

As a result of the expanded NDEA Title HI program, the 
State Department of Education completely revised all standards 
and developed new guidelines. The State Supervisor of Mathe- 
matics developed the standards for the mathematics program 
and assisted with the development of standards in the five new 
critical subject areas. 

Consultant services were rendered to other members of the 
State Department of Education upon request. In this capacity a 
visit was made to the Maryland Training School to consult with 
the mathematics department and visits were made in coopera- 
tion with the State supervisors of elementary schools. 

Services to the Local Schools 

The program of service which was already under way 
through the leadership of the State Supervisor of Science and 
Mathematics was continued by the new State Supervisor of 
Mathematics. Visitations and conferences were frequent through- 
out the year. Special attention was given to evaluating existing 
mathematics programs, planning new programs, and providing 
needed inservice opportunities for teachers. 

The Maryland Science and Mathematics Neivsletter was 
continued on a monthly basis in cooperation with the State Su- 
pervisor of Science. 



54 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



In addition to working with local school systems in plan- 
ning inservice activities, the State Supervisor conducted a num- 
ber of inservice programs personally. This permitted increased 
familiarity with local problems for the supervisor while provid- 
ing a needed service for local schools. 

He also consulted with local systems on planning projects 
for acquisition of equipment and materials. Numerous other 
activities were carried on at the request of local personnel in an 
effort to improve continually the nature and quality of mathe- 
matics education. 

General Professional Services 

A very important part of the supervisory program involved 
continuing cooperation with a vital new organization in Mary- 
land. The Maryland School -College Mathematics Association is 
striving to implement recommendations of the Committee on 
Undergraduate Preparation in Mathematics for the training of 
teachers of mathematics. It is also seeking better relations be- 
tween the colleges and the public schools. The State Supervisor 
of Mathematics is an active member of this association. 

The Supervisor has sought the cooperation of the Maryland 
Academy of Sciences to provide sessions for mathematics teach- 
ers with professional mathematicians and others in related pro- 
fessions. 

There has been continually increased cooperation between 
the University of Maryland Mathematics Project personnel and 
the State Supervisor. 

The University of Maryland has been conducting summer 
institutes in mathematics through the National Science Founda- 
tion for a number of years. During 1964-65, the State Super- 
visor of Mathematics was asked for suggestions regarding the 
nature of these institutes and for assistance in selecting partici- 
pants from among the Maryland applicants. 

Science 

The State Supervisor of High Schools, with responsibilities 
for science and the administration of Title III of the National 
Defense Act, developed programs and provided services in the 
following general areas during the 1964-65 school year: Title III 
National Defense Education Act administrative activities ; State 
and regional activities in science; activities in science for all 
local school systems; special programs in science for local 
school systems; and work with other agencies in science. 

Title III NDEA Administrative Activities 

General management and control were maintained over the 
processing of projects for the acquisition of equipment and ma- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



terials by local school systems and for the allocation and reallo- 
cation of funds in this program. In accordance with the expan- 
sion of the Title III program to include five additional subject 
areas, assistance was given in rewriting the Maryland State 
Plan, developing new guidelines, application forms and stand- 
ards, and in arranging a State conference for presenting these 
materials to representatives of local school systems. To imple- 
ment the Title III program, continuous contacts were main- 
tained with local school systems and the U.S. Office of Educa- 
tion. 

State and Regional Activities in Science 

Conferences were arranged for supervisory personnel with 
responsibilities in science at elementary and secondary levels. 
Emphasis was placed upon keeping local supervisory personnel 
appraised of new trends and developments in science education. 
Regional conferences were arranged with local school systems to 
provide such services as : clinics in special aspects of the labora- 
tory approach to science teaching; inservice training for ele- 
mentary science teachers via television ; visitation programs for 
biology teachers to see new teaching procedures; and a special, 
regional conference emphasizing new developments in chemistry 
education. 

Activities in Science for All Local School Systems 

The program for maintaining contact and providing leader- 
ship for all local school systems was continued. Visitations and 
conferences with local school personnel were continuous through- 
out the year. Emphasis was placed upon the evaluation of exist- 
ing science programs; development of new programs; and con- 
cern with inservice programs, curriculum development, improved 
teaching procedures, and the planning of new and improved 
science facilities. The Maryland Science and Mathematics Neivs- 
letter was continued on a monthly basis to keep personnel in 
local school systems informed of ideas and developments. Spe- 
cial mailings provided still further opportunities to supply local 
personnel with pertinent waitings and viewpoints on science ed- 
ucation. 

Special Programs in Science for Local School Systems 

When possible, in accord with local programs and needs, spe- 
cial programs were initiated and promoted. Such programs in- 
cluded : the development of conceptually-oriented elementary sci- 
ence programs in Howard and Allegany counties; assistance to 
a geology program in Baltimore City; improvement of junior 
high science throughout the state; and assistance to the general 
physical science program in Baltimore County. 



56 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



Work With Other Agencies in Science 

Opportunities to work with other agencies and groups in- 
terested in science education were continued. Principally among 
these was the Maryland Academy of Sciences which cooperated 
with the State Department in such programs as ''Sessions with 
Scientists" and the ''Junior Science and Humanities Symposi- 
um." Other cooperating groups included the Chesapeake and 
Potomac Telephone Company, The University of Maryland 
Science Teaching Center, the Maryland Association of Science 
Teachers, and the Maryland Association of Biology Teachers. 
Maryland was represented in the National Youth Science Camp 
sponsored by the State of West Virginia. 

Pupil Personnel and Guidance Services 

During the year 1964-65 there was rapid development and 
expansion of the entire program of pupil services throughout 
the State. Of particular significance was the program in which 
Anne Arundel County provided supervisory leadership and 
financial resources in cooperation with the State Department 
of Education and the University of Maryland for participation 
in a research project in elementary schools planned by the Inter- 
professional Research Commission on Pupil Personnel Services. 
This project had as one of its purposes the establishment of a 
sound base for decision concerning the most appropriate ap- 
proach to the provision of pupil services at the elementary school 
level. 

State Department studies on pupil services were completed 
with receipt of the study by Dr. Helen-Louise Scarborough titled 
I'The Role of the School Specialist in Interaction with Commun- 
ity and School Functionaries." 

This Department, through the work of the supervisor of 
pupil services, cooperated with other state departments and 
community groups in making available to Maryland students 
many different resources in the field of pupil services. Exam- 
ples of such cooperative effort were: 

1. The Career Opportunities Exposition sponsored by the Bal- 
timore Junior Association of Commerce 

2. In-service workshop sponsored by the Department of Parole 
and Probation 

3. Seminar for counselors sponsored by Westinghouse Electric 
Corporation 

4. Workshop for guidance supervisors sponsored by the De- 
partment of Agriculture, University of Maryland 

5. Participation in the workshop of the Maryland Advisory 
Council on Child Welfare 

6. Participation in the work of the High School College Council 



Maryland State Department of Education 



57 



Maryland personnel provided leadership in the convention 
of the International Association of Pupil Personnel Workers 
v^hich was held in Baltimore October 25-29, 1964. 

In-service programs for personnel in pupil services included 
regional conferences for counselors in Calvert, Caroline, Cecil, 
Charles, Dorchester, St. Mary's and Talbot counties and for pupil 
personnel v^orkers in the Southern Maryland and Eastern Shore 
counties. State-v^ide meetings were planned for guidance super- 
visors, school psychologists, pupil personnel supervisors, and vis- 
iting teachers. 

A State-wide committee on pupil services met regularly dur- 
ing this year to study programs of pupil services preparatory 
to writing a policy statement in this area of the educational 
program. 

Special Education 

Significant developments in Special Education during 1964- 
65 included processing applications for traineeships and fellow- 
ships under Public Law 85-926 as amended by Public Law 88- 
164. Provision is made under these laws, for financial assistance 
to teachers in all areas of exceptionality who pursue further 
training on either a full-time basis or during summer sessions. 

A research project on "Educational Programming in Sim- 
ulated Environments for Seriously Emotionally Handicapped 
Elementary School Children" was started in order to: 

1. Determine the incidence of seriously emotionally handi- 
capped third-grade pupils in a selected population in Maryland 
and to analyze this incidence in relation to the numbers found 
in other studies. 

2. Determine whether or not the simulated environments 
technique of instruction brings about greater gains in measures 
of behavior and measures of academic achievement than assign- 
ment in conventional classes. 

3. Determine which of the two methods of providing sim- 
ulated environments instruction is superior: small size special 
classes consisting of emotionally handicapped pupils only; or, 
regular size classes with a small number of emotionally handi- 
capped pupils in each class. This project was made possible 
through a federal grant under the Provisions of Title III, Sec- 
tion 302, of Public Law 88-164. 

The supervisors of special education worked with person- 
nel at the State hospital who were responsible for their edu- 
cational programs. New school programs were initiated at Spring 
Grove State Hospital and at Springfield State Hospital. 



58 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



Research projects were started in the school programs of 
three of the hospitals, major emphasis being placed on the one 
at Rosewood where they are using the Initial Teaching Alpha- 
bet with retarded children. 

The supervisors planned for and worked with personnel 
from Towson State College on a three-week workshop for teach- 
ers of the educable mentally retarded, trainable mentally re- 
tarded, emotionally handicapped, and speech handicapped. They 
planned and conducted the annual State-wide conference of 
speech and hearing therapists and the annual State-wide con- 
ference of supervisors and administrators of Special Educa- 
tion. The supervisors also visited special education classes in 
both public and nonpublic schools to evaluate programs, facil- 
ities, and equipment. They worked with a State committee on 
curriculum development for the retarded and served as consul- 
tants to local colleges and school systems in planning programs 
and in-service workshops. 

DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 

The services of the Division of Certification and Accredita- 
tion for the year 1964-65 may be reported generally under six 
broad headings: 

1. Certification of teachers 

2. Accreditation of institutions of higher learning 

3. Accreditation of nonpublic elementary and secondary 
schools 

4. Accreditation of nonpublic specialized schools 

5. Teacher education programs 

6. High school equivalence certificates 

Certification of Teachers 

After working for several years with new requirements for 
certificates adopted in May, 1961, and November, 1962, it be- 
came apparent that some revisions were necessary to update the 
requirements and remove some of the operational flaws. During 
the year 1964-65, a committee of personnel directors from the 
counties worked with the Supervisor of Certification and mem- 
bers of the Department staff to make the necessary adjustments. 
The report of this committee was completed and prepared for 
presentation to the State Board of Education for appropriate 
action. 

There were 5,179 new teachers and principals employed in 
the Maryland county schools during the year, of whom 2,963 or 
57 per cent received regular certificates. This reflects a three 
percent reduction from 1963-64 in the percentage of new teach- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



ers and principals who received regular certificates. Of those 
not regularly certificated, 74 percent held college degrees, show- 
ing a decline of five percent from 1963-64 in the number of 
teachers employed on substandard certificates who have com- 
pleted work for the basic degree. Many of these teachers lack 
only six semester hours of recent college credit or one or two 
of the specifically required professional courses. 

For the year 1964-65, 43 noncitizen teaching permits were 
issued, of which 12 were equivalent to a regular certificate. 

Over 12,000 new certificates were issued during the school 
year 1964-65. These certificates include, in addition to those is- 
sued to teachers in new positions, renewals, changes of county, 
changes in teaching assignments, and teachers in private schools 
and State institutions. 

The increase in the volume of applications for evaluation 
necessitated the addition of another counselor in certification 
who was assigned full time to the evaluation of private school 
records. 

Accreditation of Institutions of Higher Learning 

During the academic year no new community college pro- 
grams were given oflficial approval to operate in the State. How- 
ever, all of these institutions previously established continued to 
show increases in enrollment and other indications of developing 
strength as colleges of the State. One of these institutions re- 
ceived accreditation during the year by the Middle States Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Members of the Divi- 
sion continued to serve on various committees of the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and as- 
sisted in the evaluation of college level programs. These evalu- 
ations have resulted in the accreditation of one new institution 
and a reafl^rmation of accreditation of three other collegiate in- 
stitutions of the State. 

One or more members of the Division staff attended meet- 
ings of the Advisory Council to the State Committee for Higher 
Education on the Higher Education Facilities Act. Four such 
meetings were held during the year. A member of the staff 
served as secretary to the Maryland State Committee on Ful- 
bright Scholarships which met on November 24, 1964, to select 
a panel of candidates for awards of Fulbright Scholarships. 

The Commission for the Expansion of Public Higher Edu- 
cation in Maryland concluded its considerations during the year. 
A member of the staff continued to serve in the capacity of sec- 
retary to this Commission. 



60 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



A list of State-approved colleges and universities v^as con- 
tinued as a publication of the Department. The publication listed 
17 two-year colleges, 29 four-year colleges and universities, 20 
schools of nursing, 21 institutions approved for teacher educa- 
tion, and 9 professional schools. 

The staff of the Division organized evaluation teams to make 
reports and presented recommendations to the State Board of 
Education on the following collegiate programs: 

a. Two private junior colleges authorized to grant an As- 
sociate in Arts degree 

b. One private college authorized to grant a Bachelor of 
Science degree 

c. One public college authorized to grant a Master's degree 

d. One public college authorized to grant a Bachelor of 
Arts degree in specific fields. 

Among the national and regional conventions at which the 
Department was represented by staff members were the follow- 
ing: 

American Association of Junior Colleges 
American Council on Education 

Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
National Conference on Teacher Education and Professional 
Standards 

National Association of State Directors of Teacher Educa- 
tion and Certification 
American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education 

During the academic year, one of the staff members attended 
one or more meetings of school officials and citizens of local 
units of the State expressing interest in the establishment of a 
community college. In all, some five local units expressed inter- 
est in the establishment of one or more community colleges in 
their areas. 

Colleges, universities, and hospitals continued to show inter- 
est in approval for the education of veterans and war orphans. 
All accredited colleges in the State and 20 hospitals and schools 
of nursing requested and received this type of approval. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



Accreditation of Nonpublic Elementary and 
Secondary Schools 

The number and kinds of nonpublic academic schools below 
college level which were operating in the State in 1964-65 and 
which have been approved by the Department were as follows: 



Type of School Number 

Secondary schools 77 

Tutoring 8 

Nursery school (only) 33 

Kindergarten (only) 31 

Combination of nursery school and kindergarten 16 

Preschool through elementary 25 

Elementary (only) 9 

Elementary through secondary 7 

Preschool through secondary 2 

Special 30 

Total 230 



There continues to be a need for a better way of informing 
the public of the existing law which requires approval of non- 
public schools by the State Superintendent of Schools. Through- 
out the State there continue to be individuals or organizations 
that accept the responsibility for care and/or education of chil- 
dren in such a way that no existing laws apply to them insofar 
as the enforcement of standards of child care and/or education 
are concerned. The regulations for the licensing of day-care cen- 
ters under the auspices of the State Department of Health should 
help to remedy this situation. With continued close cooperation 
from the State Departments of Health, Welfare, and Education, 
it is hoped progress can be made in this area. During the year, 
an additional staff member in the area of approval of nonpublic 
elementary schools was employed. With this additional profes- 
sional assistance, it is hoped that much more thorough coverage 
of the State can be provided. 

Nonpublic Nursery Schools, Kindergartens, Elementary Schools, 
and Special Schools 

These schools operated during 1964-65 in the following 
ways: 



Cooperatives with parents participating 29 

Cooperatives administered by parents who do not 

participate daily 3 

Smaller centers (Proprietary — 3 groups or less) 34 

Larger centers (Proprietary — 4 groups or more) 15 

Schools — governed by board of directors 32 

Church -sponsored centers 23 

Others (sponsored by housing projects, civic groups, 

colleges, etc.) 17 

Total 153 



Of this total, 54 schools have indicated on the 1964-65 an- 
nual report that the school is incorporated as nonprofit. 



62 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



Special Programs — Day Care 

During the 1964-65 school year there were 22 centers offer- 
ing day-nursery or extended day-care programs as a part of the 
whole program. In 10 of these centers the entire program was 
originally approved when the Maryland nonpublic school law, 
Section 25 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, be- 
came effective in 1948. The education programs in 9 of the re- 
maining 12 centers were approved prior to 1964-65; approval 
was granted during the current year for the 3 other centers 
where day care is provided in addition to the nursery school 
and/or kindergarten programs. 

Annual report figures indicate that there are 512 preschool- 
age children enrolled for the full day at centers which provide 
day-nursery or extended day-care programs. There are also 463 
children attending half-day sessions at these centers. 

Nonpublic Special Schools 

There were 30 so-called special schools, 28 of them offering 
programs for handicapped, 7 of which were boarding schools. 
Programs are set up specifically for retarded at 11 centers; for 
emotionally disturbed at 8; disorders of central nervous system 
at 1 ; cerebral palsied at 2 ; blind at 1 ; communicative disorders 
at 2; and, for multihandicaps at 3. Six of these centers are for 
preschool -age children. Children at any of these centers may 
have multiple handicaps. 

Of these 28 centers for handicapped children, 10 are 
church sponsored ; 15 are now directed by a Board ; 1 is partially 
supported by State appropriations and 2 are privately owned. Of 
the total 1,429 children enrolled in these special schools, 235 
have been placed in centers for the emotionally disturbed. 

Accreditation of Nonpublic Specialized Schools 

During the academic year 1964-65, twenty-five specialized 
or trade and technical schools applied for and received certifi- 
cates of approval from the State Superintendent of Schools un- 
der Section 25, Article 77, of the Annotated Code of Maryland. 
Eleven certificates were either revoked or returned when the 
schools to which they were issued ceased to operate. During the 
year 175 solicitors' permits were issued to out-of-state schools, 
some of which were correspondence schools while others provide 
a residential program. These solicitors represent schools in a 
number of states, some of which are located west of the Missis- 
sippi River. 

In connection with the licensing of solicitors and salesmen 
for out-of-state schools, approximately 100 applications for per- 
mits were received and denied on the basis of improper business 
procedures, questionable advertising, enrollment contracts which 



Maryland State Department of Education 



63 



did not provide adequate protection to the enrollee, and courses 
of study which did not provide instruction as indicated by the 
title or advertising. Due to the nature of this type of school, 
several hundred complaints were investigated. A number in- 
volved contacts with the Federal Trade Commission and the 
United States postal authorities. 

The most difficult problem encountered during this period 
involved the evaluation and approval of data processing schools. 
Due to the demand for individuals trained in this area and the 
infancy and rapid development of this training, it was almost 
impossible to establish acceptable standards. A number of at- 
tempts were made to obtain information from companies pro- 
ducing this equipment and professional associations in this field 
in order to define acceptable training. However, since opinions 
and advice received were frequently in variance, no attempt was 
made to write specific standards for approval of this type of in- 
struction at this time. 

Contacts and exchange of information between this Depart- 
ment and various State and federal government agencies as 
well as nonpublic associations and organizations continued to 
be an important function of the staff assigned to this program. 
During the year, 31 schools were given tentative approval or 
were continued in this basis pending improvements of pro- 
grams, staff, or curriculum. In addition, approximately 150 ap- 
plications and inquiries were received and processed which were 
not finally approved because of loss of interest or change of plans 
on the part of the applicant. 

One of the most significant problems in the nonpublic school 
field during this period was the financial failure of several 
schools. In each case, the school was taken over by new financial 
interest with no monetary loss to the student enrolled. However, 
this situation points to a need for more adequate protection to 
the individuals enrolled in these schools. This protection might 
be provided in the form of performance bonds to be furnished 
by the schools. 

Between July 1, 1964, and June 30, 1965, approximately 
33,000 students attended nonpublic specialized resident schools 
in Maryland. Over 1,000 teachers were employed in approxi- 
mately 300 approved and tentatively approved specialized school 
programs. 

Teacher Education Programs 

During the academic year the publication entitled ''State 
Approved Teacher Education Programs in Maryland Colleges 
and Universities" was continued. This publication provides de- 
tailed information as to each program in teacher education in 
each of the various colleges of the State. Among other activities 
of staff members in the academic year was the publication of a 



64 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



pamphlet, ''Suggestions for Increasing the Supply of Teachers." 
The organization of an Advisory Committee on Teacher Educa- 
tion Programs came into being, the purpose of which is to ex- 
plore program needs and make suggestions for State-wide action. 
The bulletin, 'Teacher Preparation in Maryland — A Quantita- 
tive Survey" was updated. Two documents were produced : "Pro- 
jections of Teacher Supply and Demand in Maryland, 1965- 
1970" and "Student Teaching in Maryland." Initial steps were 
taken to develop standards for the evaluation of teacher educa- 
tion programs in Maryland, with the cooperation and assistance 
of representatives of the colleges of the State which have pro- 
grams for the preparation of teachers. Two colleges within the 
past year have requested permission to develop new programs 
in teacher education. One of the four-year institutions which had 
previously prepared secondary teachers now wishes to prepare 
elementary teachers. This program has been given tentative ap- 
proval to begin operation in September, 1966. 

The second institution has operated many years as a col- 
lege and has applied for permission to initiate a program for 
the preparation of secondary school teachers. This new activity 
has been tentatively approved for initiation with the entering 
class of 1967. 

High School Equivalence Certificates 

Each year the high school equivalence program attracts a 
greater number of applicants, especially for reexamination. Of 
the 4,097 persons who applied during 1964-65, 1,167 were ask- 
ing for retest and 2,719 were new applicants. Not all completed 
the examination, however, and less than half of those who per- 
severed earned the certificate. There has been a slight decrease 
each year since 1957-58 in the percentage of successful candi- 
dates. Previously, about two-thirds of the applicants passed the 
test the first time, and more than a third of the repeaters were 
successful. This year, only slightly more than half of the first- 
time applicants and about twenty-eight per cent of the repeaters 
qualified for the certificate. As indicated in the table elsewhere 
in this report, 3,274 candidates completed the examination, of 
whom 1,437 received the certificate. These figures include 388 
applicants tested at correctional institutions in the State, 109 of 
whom received the certificate. In addition, 672 applicants who 
previously had completed the test through the United States 
Armed Forces Institute were awarded the certificate. 

The total number of certificates issued since the program 
was established in 1941 is 31,784. 

division of library extension 

Increased demands made by citizens and students on libra- 
ries, both public and school, have increased public interest in the 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



need to accelerate the pace of library growth and improvement 
to meet these demands. The Division of Library Extension has 
worked actively during the year to gather and to publicize data 
on the status of libraries and on library needs and to develop 
standards and plans for library improvement. In addition, new 
and enlarged patterns of cooperation were developed among pub- 
lic libraries, and the services of the State to libraries were ex- 
panded. Most of these additional services were made possible 
through the availability of increased federal funds for public 
library development. The programs are described in the public 
libraries section of this report. 

A Citizens' Conference on Libraries, held in March, 1965, 
was attended by more than three hundred citizens, trustees, gov- 
ernment officials and librarians in the State. The program em- 
phasized the needs and services of public, school, and college 
libraries. 

In 1964, the Maryland General Assembly appropriated funds 
for the inauguration of a graduate school of library science at 
the University of Maryland. This program will begin in the fall 
of 1965 and will provide the first opportunity in the State for 
a full program of professional library education. The lack of an 
adequate supply of professional personnel has been one of the 
major weaknesses in the libraries of the State. The new pro- 
gram will be a significant contribution to library improvement. 

In cooperation with the Maryland Library Association and 
the Department of Correction, the Division participated in a 
survey of library needs in the adult correctional institutions of 
the State. The report, a Survey of Maryland Adult Correctional 
Institution Libraries, provides a five-year plan for the develop- 
ment of library service in these institutions. 

An Advisory Committee on Library Services for Columbia, 
the planned community in Howard County, was formed at the 
request of the Howard County Board of Library Trustees. Un- 
der the chairmanship of the Director of the Divison of Library 
Extension, the committee has secured the financial support of the 
Council on Library Resources to provide a consultant team of 
public school and educational media specialists to conduct a study 
and make recommendations for total library services in Colum- 
bia. The report will be available in the fall of 1965. 

Public Libraries 

Cooperative Programs 

Highlights in public library development were in strength- 
ening existing and initiating new patterns of cooperative use of 
all public libraries in an area, and in expanding the books collec- 
tions and other resources of the major libraries in these areas. 
The cooperative projects are aimed at increasing the quantity 



66 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



and variety of library materials easily available to all people in 
the State in response to increased demands. 

Metropolitan Maryland Library Service v^as inaugurated by 
the public library systems of Baltimore City, Baltimore, Anne 
Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, and Prince 
George's counties. Under this arrangement adult library card 
holders in any of these libraries may borrow and make use of 
the resources of all the other cooperating libraries without fee. 
Library users may use the library nearest their home or work, 
or those which provide the specialized materials needed for ser- 
ious study or research. 

The Eastern Shore Area Library, established in 1965, is an 
outgrowth and consolidation of the Lower Shore Area Library 
and the Eastern Shore Adult Services Project which began in 
the early 1960's. The Area Library, located as a part of the Wi- 
comico County Library in Salisbury with a special fiction collec- 
tion in the Talbot County Library in Easton, provides reference 
and library loans to the other libraries, traveling collections of 
specialized books and recordings, and channels unfilled requests 
to Enoch Pratt Free Library for loan. It also provides consul- 
tant services to other libraries, prepares exhibits, news releases, 
information bulletins, and plans and conducts in-service work- 
shops and conferences. Library borrowers from any county on 
the Shore may also borrow books directly from the Area Library 
or from any other cooperating library free of charge. 

The Eastern Shore Processing Center expanded its volume 
of service and its coverage of libraries. Contractual arrange- 
ments were made with the Delaware State Library Commission 
to order and process books for the Commission and for ten 
public libraries in Delaware. Seventeen Maryland county public 
library systems were served. In 1964-65, the Center processed 
82,520 books, an increase of 29,308 over the previous year. 

The Southern Maryland Regional Library Association or- 
ganized in 1958, began to implement plans for establishing cen- 
tral reference services, expanding the jointly-owned collections, 
and setting up new professional positions for supervision and 
administration. Lack of availability of professional personnel 
has delayed the development of other programs. 

State Services 

The following new activities resulted in improved State serv- 
ices and resources to public libraries: 

Teletype Service — As an extension and improvement in the 
supplementary loan service provided by the Enoch Pratt Free 
Library through contract with the State Department of Educa- 
tion, plans were under way to install teletype communication be- 
tween the Enoch Pratt and the headquarters of each county pub- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



67 



lie library in the State. This service will provide rapid answering 
of reference questions and cut in half the time now necessary 
for mail delivery of loan requests to Pratt. In effect, it provides 
instant access from anywhere in the State to the Pratt collection 
and services. 

Library Education — In order to encourage the addition of 
professional library personnel and to provide for training of in- 
terested persons, the Division of Library Extension set up a pro- 
gram of scholarship grants to the public libraries to provide for 
one year of graduate library education for a present or potential 
staff member of each library system. Library Services and Con- 
struction Act funds are being used for this program. 

Other in-service education programs included workshops for 
librarians and trustees and a continuation to the central part of 
the State of the intensive in-service education program begun 
in 1964. In addition, the State provided funds to librarians and 
trustees to cover expenses of attendance at approved out-of- 
State institutes and workshops. Twelve trustees attended an in- 
stitute, held in Detroit, on planning for public library buildings. 

The Division purchased and distributed two book lists : Nov- 
els ivith a Flavor and Politics, 196^. These lists, available through 
libraries to all persons in the State, are designed to call atten- 
tion to significant books or books on issues of current concern 
or importance. 

Book Grants — Financed with LSCA federal funds, this 
project provided grants to the smaller library systems with in- 
adequate book collections to focus on the acquisition of substan- 
tial works in defined subject areas in order to build collections 
of substance and quality. Eighteen libraries participated in the 
project. 

Grants and Assistance in Studies and Surveys — Assistance 
was provided to libraries to develop plans for needed studies 
of local library problems, and grants were made for consultants 
to make the approved studies. Several studies were made in the 
area of building needs, two in personnel and organization, one 
in long-range plans for library development. 

Through the contract with the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 
27,866 books and 7,011 films were borrowed by the county libra- 
ries to fill reader requests for specialized materials. 

Public Library Buildings 

During the 1964-65 fiscal year, the passage of a federal bill 
and a Maryland State bill gave great impetus to construction of 
public library buildings. The Library Services and Construction 
Act of 1964 was signed by the President on September 19, 1964. 
Title II of this act provides federal financial assistance for the 
construction of new public library buildings and the initial equip- 
ment of such buildings. 



68 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



The Anne Arundel County Library, with building- plans 
completed and ready for filing", received early approval and was 
the recipient of the first federal grant in the nation awarded 
under this bill. In addition to Anne Arundel, five other counties 
and Baltimore City submitted approved projects and qualified 
for funds available to Maryland. Maryland's initial allocation 
was $519,710; later a reallocation gave Maryland an additional 
$94,804, making a total of $614,514. 

The State Public Library Incentive Law for buildings be- 
came effective in July, 1964. This law provides matching State 
aid to the counties and Baltimore City to finance debt service 
and/or pay-as-you-go capital outlay expenditures for the pur- 
chase of land, construction, remodeling, and furnishing of library 
buildings. According to the formula, the State's annual contri- 
bution is the difference between one-half cent on each one hun- 
dred dollars of assessed valuation of property and twenty-five 
cents per capita of the local unit population. 

During the fiscal year, sixteen counties and Baltimore City 
qualified for funds under this act. 



School Libraries 

The 1962-63 State-wide survey of public school libraries was 
published in the fall of 1964. The United States Oflfice of Edu- 
cation had conducted a similar nationwide survey of school libra- 
ries for the same school year. A comparison of the two studies 
shows that in a number of areas, Maryland school libraries are 
better than the national average: 

United States Maryland 



1. Percent of all public schools with centralized 

libraries 58.9 84.6 

2. Percent of all pupils in public schools with 

centralized libraries 74.3 94.3 

3. Percent of all school librarians with 15 to 16 

semester hours in library science 78.1 80.7 

4. Expenditure per pupil for library books $2.28 $2.36 

5. Percent of all public schools with centralized 

libraries served by librarians 68.1 61.5 

6. Number of pupils per librarian, public schools 

with centralized libraries 932 1,384 

The State-wide survey showed that the educational prep- 



aration of the school librarian compares favorably with that of 
teachers in the State: 

Teachers Librarians 

1. No degree 13.6% 6.6% 

2. Bachelor's degree only 69.0% 64.2% 

3. Master's degree 17.4% 29.2% 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



Efforts are continuing to relieve librarians of nonprofes- 
sional duties in order that their time may be used effectively 
v^ith teachers and pupils. Baltimore City and Anne Arundel and 
Baltimore counties provide centralized ordering and processing 
of all books for the individual school libraries; Montgomery 
County provides the same services for nonprint materials as v^ell 
as books ; Frederick, Harford, and Hov^ard counties provide cen- 
tralized cataloging for nev^ schools and certain selected existing 
ones ; Prince George's County contracts with a commercial com- 
pany to provide the services. 

There is growing recognition of the fact that new schools 
need considerable additional funds for the establishment of libr- 
aries and that materials need to be selected and processed in ad- 
vance of the opening of the school; this practice is apt to be 
more prevalent for secondary schools than for elementary ones. 

As a result of being awarded a Knapp Grant, the library in 
the Mount Royal elementary school in Baltimore City has been 
serving as a demonstration and observation center for school 
administrators and librarians for the entire east coast. 

The supervisor of school libraries in the Division of Library 
Extension continued to spend a little more than one-third of her 
time in the field. Her other activities included serving as a con- 
sultant to the U.S. Office of Education for the selection of NDEA 
school library institutes; a member of the advisory committee 
for the nationwide study of library services in schools for the 
deaf, of the advisory committee for the Mount Royal School 
Knapp Project, of the Wye Institute books awards committee; 
chairman of the Maryland Library Association program commit- 
tee, and of the committee to select participants in the First Citi- 
zens' Conference on Libraries. She was a member of the State 
Department of Education's committee for preparing guidelines 
for the administration of the revised NDEA and has been as- 
signed the responsibility of evaluating local NDEA plans and 
projects for A-V libraries. She also participated in workshops 
for the preparation of teachers who were to be engaged in the 
Head Start and Catch-up programs. 

DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

The program of vocational education in Maryland's public 
schools has continued to expand in size, in scope, and in inten- 
sity of activity during 1964-65. The economic growth rate in the 
State during this period has been one of the highest in the na- 
tion. This has provided a favorable climate for the concomitant 
growth of vocational education. 

During the initial period of the implementation of the Vo- 
cational Education Act of 1963 the emphasis on vocational edu- 
cation in Maryland has been placed upon the following areas : 



70 



NiNETY-NlNTFI ANNUAL REPORT 



a. The development of a new State Plan for Vocational Educa- 
tion, which makes provisions for a total program of voca- 
tional education at all levels. 

b. A program of information and education for local educational 
personnel and the general public concerning the total concept 
of vocational education. 

c. The development of plans and procedures whereby vocational 
education can be made available to all people within the State. 

d. The allocation of federal funds to the local educational agen- 
cies for the purchase of equipment in order to update and 
improve existing programs. 

e. The allocation of State and federal funds for the construction 
and equipment of area vocational schools. 

f . The encouragement of experimental programs designed to ex- 
pand occupational education services at the high school level. 

g. The strengthening of relationships with the Department of 
Emplojmient Security as a means of determining the needs 
and fulfilling the demands of the labor market for compe- 
tently trained workers. 

h. Initiating and encouraging cooperative action wherever such 
action was called for to make maximum use of occupational 
training in dealing with unemployment and related social 
and economic problems. 

Accomplishments of the Year 

Maryland's accomplishments in the field of vocational edu- 
cation during 1964-65 were consistent with the attention and 
effort expended by State and local educational leaders while 
working cooperatively with representatives of industry, labor 
and management, local, State and federal governmental agencies 
as well as interested laymen. 

Principal among the overall accomplishments which should 
be noted are those described below. 

Enrollment 

The enrollment figures for all areas and all levels of voca- 
tional education indicate that more than 326,000 persons in 
Maryland in 1964-65 received instructions in which occupational 
competence was the principal or a related purpose. 

New Programs 

In almost every occupational field, new curriculums, many 
with unique patterns of organization, were developed. Some of 
these programs were started during the school year, while others 
accepted students in the fall semester of the 1965 school year. 
Unique occupational preparation programs were planned to 
serve the developing businesses and industries of the State. For 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



the first time, attention was given to the development of instruc- 
tional patterns for the so-called ''unskilled" and ''semiskilled" 
occupations. And, in addition, several realistic training experi- 
ences were devised for the seriously handicapped. 

Additional Training Locations 

Advances were made during the year in the planning and 
funding of vocational education programs in many local educa- 
tional units previously unserved. Substantial extension of train- 
ing opportunities to the rural and sometimes remote areas, 
coupled with the more routine expansion in the heavily popu- 
lated sections of the State, accounted for much of the gain in 
training facilities. 

Expanded Facilities 

During 1964-65, five new area vocational school facilities 
were planned, and contracts were awarded for their construc- 
tion. The addition of these facilities will increase the number of 
vocational education offerings by shops and laboratories. 

The local educational unit that did not in 1964-65 add new 
facilities for vocational education, or modify existing facilities, 
was an exception. The trend toward augmentation of physical 
facilities was almost universal. 

New Legislation 

The General Assembly of Maryland, at its 1965 session, en- 
acted legislation providing for financial support for the construc- 
tion of area vocational schools. This support is provided through 
a $10 million bond issue and covers all projects initiated after 
December 1, 1964. The amount of financial assistance granted 
will be at least 50 percent of the total cost of the project includ- 
ing its initial and permanent equipment; the amount may ex- 
ceed this percentage, dependent upon the amount of State aid 
already allotted under the minimum current expense program. 

The General Assembly also: (1) made provision for the es- 
tablishment of regional community colleges of two or more coun- 
ties and provided $5 million for construction purposes, with the 
State bearing up to 75 percent of the total cost of such colleges. 
The colleges will offer vocational, technical, and semiprofessional 
programs and serve the more sparsely populated sections of 
the State; (2) provided $600,000 for matching purposes under 
MDTA for fiscal 1966, if needed; and (3) made mandatory the 
supply and use of protective eye devices for all persons partici- 
pating in and/or visiting certain industrial arts, vocational edu- 
cation, and science laboratories. 

The Bylaws for the implementation of each piece of legis- 
lation listed above were developed by members of the State staff 
with the help of local supervisory personnel. 



72 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



Expansion of Vocational Education in the High Schools 

One of the most promising developments has been a State- 
wide effort to realize the occupational training potential of the 
comprehensive high school. The cooperative efforts of the State 
Department Staff and the staff members of each of the local 
education units v^ere significant in this connection. An effort 
to revitalize vocational education at this high school level, begun 
in the spring of 1964, produced measurable results in 1964-65. 
New and strengthened programs of vocational instruction 
emerged. The success of these programs has inspired additional 
attention to this part of the curriculum by members of school 
boards, administrative staffs, students, professional associations, 
and lay advisors. 

Manpower Development and Training Act 

Maryland continued to design and operate excellent train- 
ing programs under the Manpower Development and Training 
Act. This legislation is aimed at training unemployed persons 
to enable them to become self-supporting citizens. Maryland's 
MDTA programs have been characterized by a 70 percent em- 
ployment rate for those who have completed training courses. 
Ninety percent of those placed in employment after training 
were employed in the occupation for which training was re- 
ceived. 

In 1964-65 Maryland conducted forty-eight projects under 
MDTA. During this period, thirty different training projects 
were developed for more than 1,600 trainees. Approximately 
71 percent of the training was accomplished in public school 
facilities. 

Among the interesting facts concerning the characteristics 
of trainees served by this program through June 30, 1965, are 
the following. 

• 35 percent were female. 

• 44 percent were high school graduates. 

• 16 percent had been unemployed 1 year or more prior to 
entering training. 

• 47 percent of the enrollees were classified as heads of 
households. 

Teacher Recruitment and Certification 

The new Maryland State Plan for Vocational Education con- 
tained several changes in certification requirements for voca- 
tional teachers as well as classifications of instructors which 
would be needed for the expanded purposes included under the 
Vocational Act of 1963. Certification requirments were reexam- 
ined, and new programs of pre-service and in-service teacher 
education were developed by State staff members, teacher edu- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



cators, and representatives from local boards of education. At- 
tention was given not only to new degree programs but also to 
immediate staffing needs. As a result, a special teacher educa- 
tion workshop was begun at the University of Maryland to pro- 
vide teachers for a number of the local school districts. 

State Advisory Council for Vocational Education 

The Maryland State Board of Education, which also serves 
as the State Board of Vocational Education, acted upon the rec- 
ommendation of the State Director of Vocational Education and 
appointed a State Advisory Council for Vocational Education in 
January, 1965. Meetings were held several times during the 
spring of 1965 at which time the committee gave detailed atten- 
tion to a variety of existing and anticipated developments in the 
total program of vocational education. 

Implementation of the Vocational Education Act of 1963 

Without question, one of the most significant attainments in 
1964-65 was the establishment of policies and procedures where- 
by the Vocational Education Act of 1963 (P.L. 88-210) might 
become immediately operative upon its funding by Congress. 
This procedure is commonly referred to as the development of 
the State Plan for Vocational Education. 

Several conferences for school administrators and local su- 
pervisors were conducted by the State staff for the purpose of 
receiving advice and for explaining the purposes and implica- 
tions of the new federal legislation. Ten State -wide advisory 
committees, a total of more than 50 persons, lay and profes- 
sional, were involved in the determination of initial standards 
and procedures. A new State Plan was adopted by the State 
Board of Education and submitted to the U.S. Commissioner of 
Education. The Plan was accepted and approved as of Novem- 
ber 27, 1964. 

The staff at the State level developed forms and procedures 
for making application for anticipated funds. Local educational 
units all over the State became involved in analyzing and ap- 
praising their existing programs of vocational education and de- 
veloping proposals for the improvement and expansion of such 
programs. 

This effort so stimulated attention to the further develop- 
ment of vocational education that most local units were in a 
position to operate their upgraded or new vocational programs 
by the spring of 1965. 

Staff Additions & Reorganization 

The critical need for a staff organization of the Division 
of Vocational Education, in the State Department of Education, 



74 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



that could match the insistent demand for leadership, direction, 
and coordination was recognized, and the 1964-65 budget per- 
mitted the additions of several new State staff members. Edu- 
cational supervisors were added in Technical Education, Trade 
and Industrial Education, and MDTA during 1964-65. 

At the local educational staff level in many of the local units, 
educational specialists in Vocational Education have been ap- 
pointed to staff positions. 

DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE 

Legislation enacted by the Maryland General Assembly at 
its regular session in 1964 made the first major revision in the 
basic State Aid to Education program since 1921. Because of 
this there was a considerable increase in State Aid to Educa- 
tion as the new aid formula became effective. The State Share 
of Current Expense increased from approximately 30 percent in 
fiscal 1964 to 36 percent in fiscal 1965. State aid for the mini- 
mum program increased by $28,000,000. The new program de- 
fines a foundation program of $340 per pupil to be shared by 
the State and the local units. The elements of the $340 program 
include a basic salary scale minimum staffing level and an 
amount for ''other current expense" costs. The local unit share 
is based on a measure of wealth which includes real property 
and net taxable ordinary income. Those units with a relatively 
large measure of wealth are guarantesd $98 per pupil in State 
aid under this program. The State provides additional aid to 
those units which staff beyond the levels recommended in the 
minimum program. This incentive aid is provided in the same 
ratio as the State share of the foundation program. State aid 
for transportation is no longer a part of the minimum program 
but is funded by a separate appropriation. Approximately 97 
percent of the total transportation cost in 1964-65 was at State 
expense. 



School Lunch and Direct Distribution of Commodities 

State-wide there was a 11.3 percent increase in participa- 
tion in the School Lunch Program in 1964-65 over 1963-64. Only 
one local unit had a decrease; the other local units shared in 
the increase. The rate of reimbursement was reduced from 0.04 
to 0.035 in April and to 0.03 for May and June with the aver- 
age rate for the year 0.0384. 

The Special Assistance Program (school lunch), on a pilot 
basis, was in effect in three schools in one local unit. This addi- 
tional assistance (cash and commodities) enabled the school 
lunch program to be extended to approximately 225 additional 
children. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



75 



In-service training programs for school lunch personnel 
were continued with all twenty-four local units holding such 
programs during the school year. 

In compliance with the National School Lunch Program reg- 
ulations to assure adequacy of program operations, 323 admin- 
istrative reviews of school lunch program operations in indi- 
vidual schools were completed in Maryland during the 1964-65 
school year. 

In the Special Milk Program there was a 1.2 percent in- 
crease in participation in 1964-65 over 1963-64. 

The Maryland State Department of Education acting as a 
distributing agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, allo- 
cated Government -donated commodities to 941 public schools 
and 56 nonpublic schools which participated in the program. 
The total approximate value of food purchased by the U.S. De- 
partment of Agriculture for direct distribution to schools in the 
State of Maryland was $4,243,776. 

Donated commodities and cash assistance for the Special 
Milk Program were also made available to all interested Head 
Start and academic programs sponsored in connection with the 
Office of Economic Opportunity's war on poverty and to one 
additional preschool program conducted by a local unit. 

Driver Education 

Maryland public schools were considerably above the na- 
tional average for making courses available in driver education ; 
however, student enrollment in these courses was slightly be- 
low the national average. 

Frostburg and Salisbury State colleges approved offerings 
in driver education for both advanced undergraduate and gradu- 
ate students. With these additions driver education courses are 
now available within reasonable commuting distance of all 
teaching personnel. 

Without success, the Legislature actively pursued legisla- 
tion requiring an approved driver education course for a per- 
son who applies for a driver's license before he reaches eigh- 
teen years of age. 

Pupil Transportation 

During the year, two additional State colleges, Frostburg 
and Salisbury, approved offerings in Pupil Transportation to be 
made available to advanced undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents. These offerings, along with Towson State College and the 
University of Maryland, make courses available within com- 
muting distance of all educational personnel within the State. 



76 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



At the Adult Education Center, University of Maryland, a 
one-week's workshop was held for transportation supervisors in 
the local public school system of Maryland. The theme was 'The 
Transportation Supervisor as the Coordinator for the School 
Bus Driver Instruction Program/' The Coordinator for the work- 
shop was Prof. Amos E. Neyhart, Director Emeritus, Institute 
of Public Safety, The Pennsylvania State University. As a re- 
sult of this workshop, a manual is being developed containing- 
specific guides for carrying out a pre-service instruction pro- 
gram for school bus drivers. A representative from each of the 
twenty-four local school systems participated in the workshop. 

School Plant Planning 

Construction continued at a rapid pace during the school 
year 1964-65, including totally new facilities, additions to exist- 
ing facilities, and alterations and remodeling of existing build- 
ings; total capital expenditures for school house construction 
completed and made available for use in the year amounted to 
almost $75,000,000. Construction contracts approved by the State 
Superintendent totaled 146 for the period. 

Plans for new construction revealed a continued reduction 
in fenestration and increased provision for year-round environ- 
mental controls. Air conditioning plants were placed into oper- 
ation in Anne Arundel and Frederick counties. Another contin- 
uing trend is the provision of flexibility for conversion of space 
to meet both current and future educational needs. 

Planning for expansion and construction of junior colleges 
throughout the State continued at a rapid rate. Legislation pro- 
vided additional funds for regional junior colleges and estab- 
lished fund distribution based on State participation in local 
operating costs. 

The Area Vocational School Construction Loan of 1965 pro- 
vided $10,000,000 in State funds to assist local units in the con- 
struction of area vocational facilities. 

The General Assembly amended existing statutes to in- 
crease the amount of expenditures related to school construction, 
above which the State Superintendent's approval is required, 
from $300 to $5,000 and the maximum expenditures, allowed 
without formal bidding, from $1,000 to $5,000. 

A State-wide fire code became effective requiring all school 
facilities to be designed and constructed in conformity with the 
Building Exits Code of the National Fire Prevention Associa- 
tion. 

Five teams of local board members and educational admin- 
istrators selected from several areas of the State made school 



Maryland State Department of Education 



77 



visitations outside of the State which were found to be very 
helpful. 

Members of the State Department of Education, including 
the School Plant Section, acting as an advisory committee to the 
Howard County Board of Education, met jointly with members 
of the J. L. Rouse Co., developers of Columbia City, to plan for 
the educational program for this new community-city. 

Personnel 

As of June 30, 1965, there were 263 employees in the State 
Department of Education, 130 in Headquarters, and 133 in Vo- 
cational Rehabilitation, including the two positions in the pro- 
gram for the Employment of the Handicapped. This number is 
an increase of 36 employees during the fiscal year. 



78 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



division of research and development 
General 

The fundamental purpose of the Division of Research and 
Development is the improvement of the public educational en- 
terprise through the application of modem techniques in the 
collection, analysis, and utilization of experimental and opera- 
tional statistics and information. The Division provides services 
for and works cooperatively with the other divisions of the 
State Department of Education, the local school systems, the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, the Federal Government, professional as- 
sociations, and other interested organizations and individuals. 
Services include assistance in defining areas of investigation, 
identifying relevant data, designing appropriate data-gathering 
instruments and procedures, processing raw data, analyzing and 
interpreting processed data, formulating inferences, and devel- 
oping operational conclusions. On the basis of these conclusions, 
existing practices may be evaluated and programs for educa- 
tional improvements may be implemented. The Division main- 
tains a bank of basic educational data which may be drawn upon 
in connection with these services. The specific services per- 
formed by the Division depend upon the special needs of the re- 
cipients as well as the resources of the Division. Title X of the 
National Defense Education Act provides matching funds to 
assist in the improvement of State statistical services. In 1964- 
65 $43,542 was available from the federal government for this 
purpose. 

Administrative Research and Statistical Section 

During the year the staff assisted in the administration of 
the program to distribute State and federal aid to the local pub- 
lic school systems of Maryland. Included here are both the pay- 
ment of State aid during the current school year and prepara- 
tion of estimates for the State budget. Assistance was also given 
to local superintendents in providing estimates of State aid for 
local budgets. 

This year was particularly significant since major revisions 
in the State-aid-to-education laws enacted by the Maryland Gen- 
eral Asembly in 1964 were implemented. This meant that time 
was spent in explaining the changes to representatives of local 
school systems of Maryland as well as other interested persons. 
These changes in the State aid formula were the result of a long- 
range study conducted by the local school systems and this De- 
partment. This Division had considerable responsibility in help- 
ing to develop the changes in the State aid formula as well as in 
computing the numerous calculations which were made during 
the study. 

The staff worked with members of the other divisions of 
the State Department of Education to provide information of a 



Maryland State Department of Education 



79 



recurring nature as well as to provide data for special projects, 
workshops, etc. Included were data covering subject offerings, 
enrollments, and class size of Maryland high schools; status of 
desegregation ; school construction ; library data for both school 
and community libraries; characteristics of teachers covering 
certification, preparation, experience, and turnover; school lunch 
and school milk programs; special education programs for han- 
dicapped children; higher education fact sheet; vocational edu- 
cation; and summer school programs. 

Members of the Division participated in a series of meet- 
ings with the staff of the Division of Vocational Education to 
evaluate and develop further a data system making maximum 
use of automatic data processing. Later in the year Maryland 
was invited to participate in a seven-state project sponsored by 
the United States Office of Education to develop a model infor- 
mation system for vocational education. 

A survey instrument was developed in cooperation with 
members of the Division of Instruction to provide information 
on class size and subject offerings in elementary schools. De- 
signed to be processed by automatic data processing, this sur- 
vey v/as completed by all of the public elementary schools in 
Maryland. 

In April, 1965, a State committee, with Mr. Maxwell E. 
Burdette of Montgomery County as chairman, was appointed by 
the State Board of Education to study all items and forms used 
in the present system of pupil data. Changes made will include 
the redesigning of forms to provide for greater use of automatic 
data processing and the development of a handbook to imple- 
ment Handbook V, Pupil Accounting for Local and State School 
Systems. 

Special attention is being given to the uses to be made of 
the information. To assist the main committee, subcommittees 
are working in the areas of pupil dropouts, follow-up of gradu- 
ates, pupil transportation, health, special education, and tech- 
niques for pupil accounting. 

A representative of the Division served on a State commit- 
tee on administrative and supervisory salaries in the local school 
systems of Maryland. Meeting monthly, the committee in its re- 
port recommended changes in the kinds of positions and salary 
schedules supported by State funds. 

Recurring and special requests from the United States Office 
of Education and National Education Association were handled 
by this Division. These included regular questionnaires from 
these groups, concerning enrollment, staff, school construction, 
and financial data. In addition, extensive data were provided for 
the biennial survey from the U.S. Office of Education, and bien- 
nial salary data from the N.E.A. The Division also processed 



80 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



requests from the Maryland school systems, Maryland State 
Teachers Association, other state departments of education, grad- 
uate students and the general public. 

Information was provided to other departments of Mary- 
land State government. The staff worked very closely with the 
State Fiscal Research Bureau in the preparation of data for the 
Legislative Council before and during the sessions of the 1965 
Maryland General Assembly. 

The statistical portions of the Annual Report of the State 
Board of Education were prepared by this Division. Most of the 
preparation of the report for the printers was also the responsi- 
bility of this Division. 

The staff participated in State, regional, and national con- 
ferences related to the improvement and development of statis- 
tical and research functions affecting education at local. State, 
and federal levels. These included meetings of: 

American Association of School Administrators 
American Educational Data Systems 
American Association of School Business Officials 
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 
Committee on Educational Data System 

Northeast States Council for Educational Research and Statistics 
Southern States Council on Educational Research and Statistics 

Automatic Data Processing Section 

Ongoing services to the various divisions of the Department 
and other elements of the educational community were provided 
by the ADP Section during 1964-65. In addition the following 
new applications and projects were cooperatively undertaken : 

1. A system was developed to produce a report on the Mary- 
land secondary school teachers who are teaching out of their 
field of certification. This report will provide annually bet- 
ter information on the assignment of secondary school 
teachers. 

2. Information from a State -wide elementary school staffing 
and organization survey was processed. 

3. A directory of nonconventional school building designs and 
noteworthy facilities in the State was developed in cooper- 
ation with the superintendents. This document was designed 
to provide annually useful information for local and State 
school plant planners. 

4. The preparation of monthly statements of appropriations, 
expenditures, and encumbrances of the Department for ac- 
counting and administrative purposes was initiated. 

5. The collecting and reporting of information about State- 
aided handicapped children was converted to a punch-card 
system. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



6. The Division represented by the Systems Analyst, offered 
consultant services and funds to Calvert, Charles, and St. 
Mary's counties to assist in the installation of their re- 
gional data processing center. This center will offer many 
benefits to the three school systems and will ultimately pro- 
vide the State Department of Education with educational 
data of high quality in readily usable form. 

Instruction Research Section 

During 1964-65, the final development and field testing of 
forms for the Survey of Educational Practices in Maryland Pub- 
lic Schools was completed. The printing, distribution, and col- 
lection of the forms were accomplished preparatory to review 
and editing for data processing. 

The Supervisor of Instruction (Research), working cooper- 
atively with the Advisory Council for High Education and the 
Council for High School-College Relations, developed the ques- 
tionnaire and assisted with the pilot-testing and administration 
of the Survey of Post-High School Planning of Seniors in Mary- 
land Schools. 

The Division continued to provide staff coordination serv- 
ices and financial assistance to the Maryland IRCOPPS project 
(Interprofessional Research Commission on Pupil Personnel 
Services) based at the University of Maryland. 

The Supervisor of Instruction (Research) and the Systems 
Analyst continued to assist Mrs. Rozelle Miller, Supervisor of 
Special Education in the Division of Instruction and Chief In- 
vestigator, in the activities of the Maryland Educational Re- 
search Project focused on educational programming for seriously 
emotionally handicapped children in the Anne Arundel County 
schools. 

Using the services of professionals from the Maryland pub- 
lic schools and a staff member from a State college on a part- 
time and summer employment basis, work continued on the ab- 
stracting of published educational research for publication and 
circulation in the Maryland educational community. The first 
issue in this series was published in the area of teaching effec- 
tiveness. The second issue on research on pupil personnel serv- 
ices will be distributed in the early summer of 1966. 

Educational Television 

Working closely with the State Educational Television Ad- 
visory Committee and the Maryland Council for Educational 
Television, the Division continued efforts to bring ETV to Mary- 
land, Following numerous meetings, involving a committee of 
the State Board of Education, various technical consultants, rep- 



82 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



resentatives of State agencies such as the Department of Bud- 
get and Procurement, the State Planning Department, and the 
Department of Public Improvements, the State Board of Educa- 
tion approved a plan for a State-wide network of ETV stations. 
Funds for the initial phase of the plan were included in the 
Governor's supplemental budget request to the 1965 Maryland 
General Assembly. 

Without appropriate hearings by the Finance Committees 
of the Legislature, ETV funds were deleted from the budget and 
ETV was referred to the Legislative Council for study and a 
report to the 1966 Legislature. 

Planning with numerous consultants and other activities to 
protect Maryland's interests in ETV continued, pending the 
start of hearings by the Legislative Council scheduled for July, 
1965. Members of the State ETV Advisory Committee, the Mary- 
land Council for ETV, and the Division continued to disseminate 
information and solicit public support for a State-wide ETV sys- 
tem through participation in the meetings of various organiza- 
tions and through the use of the news media. 

In June, 1965, following the petition of the State Board of 
Education to the Federal Communications Commission for UHF 
channels to accommodate the proposed ETV network, the Com- 
mission assigned to Maryland six channels which may be used 
for ETV purposes. These channels may be applied for by any 
nonprofit educational or community organization. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



83 



division of vocational rehabilitation 

Highlights of the Year 

Vocational Rehabilitation in Maryland made significant ad- 
vances in 1965, following the broad lines of increased services to 
disabled persons, staff development, expansion and improvement 
of rehabilitation program needs in Maryland, and the develop- 
ment of research and demonstration projects. 

During fiscal 1965, 7,406 disabled citizens from every county 
and Baltimore City were provided with one or more services, 
an increase of 736 over the preceding year. The number of new 
referrals, 6,808, was an increase of 1,730 over fiscal 1964. Clients 
rehabilitated into gainful employment numbered 2,410, an in- 
crease of 436 over the previous year. The total caseload on the 
rolls of the Division was 12,705, an increase of 1,730 over the 
preceding year. 

The State's program for the blind continued to expand. 
Sixty-eight blind persons were rehabilitated into a variety of 
jobs, including 6 medical transcribers who were employed in 
medical records departments in various hospitals. During the 
year, the number of blind persons employed as managers under 
the Randolph -Sheppard Vending Stand Program reached 26, 
with average monthly earnings of $701. 

Vocational Rehabilitation units for the mentally ill and 
mentally retarded — as part of a Department of Mental Hygiene 
-State Department of Education cooperative program — were ini- 
tiated, with the first such unit being activated in 1965 at the 
Crownsville State Hospital. 

The National Advisory Council on Vocational Rehabilitation 
approved the request of the State of Maryland for a Research 
and Demonstration Grant to undertake the first comprehensive 
study of a total State vocational rehabilitation program by an 
outside research group, namely, the Bureau of Educational Re- 
search and Field Services of the University of Maryalnd. 

The total cost of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program in 
Maryland in 1965 was $1,989,045, of which $1,198,294 came from 
federal funds and $790,751 State funds. The total expenditure 
was approximately one-third of the annual earnings of the 2,410 
rehabilitants, which was $6,262,464. 

General Expansion 

While 1965 became the year of long-range planning and de- 
tailed studies of research and program development, of in-serv- 
ice staff training and case service review, and of persistent 
ground work on developing projects with mental health, correc- 
tional, special education, and other public and voluntary pro- 



84 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



grains serving the disabled, again in 1965 there was increased 
accomplishment in a number of areas of the program of the Di- 
vision of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

Among the factors responsible for these expanded services 
w^ere increases in case service funds available and the addition 
of ten new counseling positions. While new counselors could not 
be expected to produce effectively in their first year, their total 
contribution helped materially to increase the number of services 
provided. 

In addition to the impetus given to the Vocational Rehabil- 
itation program by the appropriation of additional case service 
funds and the creation of new counseling positions, there was 
another factor which contributed to the heightened morale and 
the resulting greater effort on the part of the staff. This was 
the creation of the Counselor III classification, which made it 
possible to give tangible recognition to career counselors with 
extensive service records. 

Also, five part-time medical advisors were employed to serve 
various district professional staffs on matters pertaining to phys- 
ical restoration. Heretofore a single State-wide medical consul- 
tant had been unable to provide adequate medical advisory serv- 
ices to the members of the district counseling staffs. 

Through a Vocational Rehabilitation Administration grant, 
the Division was able to enlarge its in-service staff development 
program. A series of seminars conducted by specialists in vari- 
ous fields was held for both supervisory and counseling staffs. In 
addition, staff members who wished to pursue graduate courses 
in the universities in fields related to the performance of their 
duties were able to obtain financial assistance through this grant. 

Rehabilitation of the Mentally Handicapped 

The greatest single expansion in the rehabilitation program 
during the year was in providing services for the mentally han- 
dicapped. The unit at Crownsville State Hospital, which was 
launched on July 1 in cooperation with the State Department of 
Mental Hygiene, developed a case load of over 1,000 persons and 
closed as rehabilitated the cases of 90 clients, this in spite of 
the fact it was a new program with four inexperienced coun- 
selors on the job. 

Other developments following the new emphasis on services 
for the mentally handicapped included the complete ground work 
for a vocational rehabilitation unit at Rosewood State Hospital 
which was ready to begin operation on July 1, 1965, and the 
development of a program at Spring Grove State Hospital for 
the training of patients as nursing aides. In the first course of 
the Spring Grove program, 15 patients were trained, of whom 



Maryland State Department of Education 



85 



13 were placed in employment in the community within a month 
after completion of the training. These 15 clients had been pa- 
tients in the hospital for periods varying from 1-9 years with a 
total of 57 years spent in the institution. Initial steps were 
taken also to establish at Spring Grove State Hospital a unit 
similar to that in operation at Crovrasville State Hospital. 

Also, in the area of work with the mentally retarded, the 
Division cooperated with organizations in Frederick County, with 
the aid of a Vocational Rehabilitation Administration grant, to 
establish the Jeanne Bussard Training Workshop in Frederick. 

Other Areas 

Throughout the State there was progress in various other 
areas of the program. In Western Maryland, in addition to mak- 
ing an excellent record in increasing the number of rehabilita- 
tion closures per counselor and for the district, staff members 
cooperated with local boards of education, with the Maryland 
Correctional Institution, and with the various private agencies 
in developing plans for rehabilitation units and sheltered work- 
shops. The Southern Maryland and Metropolitan Washington 
areas also increased materially the number of clients per coun- 
selor. Of special significance in this area was the outstanding 
accomplishment in the placement of mentally retarded clients in 
federal employment. For the second consecutive year the record 
of this district in this respect far surpassed that of any other 
area in the United States. In Montgomery County, cooperation 
with both the public schools and the Department of Health was 
facilitated by the assignment of a rehabilitation counselor on a 
part-time basis to each junior and senior high school and to each 
of the County health centers. This action resulted in a signifi- 
cant increase in referrals from these two sources. During this 
year also the concentrated effort toward the rehabilitation of the 
blind in Montgomery and Prince George's counties, which was 
begun earlier by the appointment of a special counselor, began 
to bear fruit. 

In the Metropolitan Baltimore area, increased services were 
provided to several hospitals although insufficient professional 
staff rendered it impossible to do this to the extent needed. Mem- 
bers of the Metropolitan staff participated in the Community 
Health Fair sponsored by St. Agnes Hospital which attracted a 
large number of persons from within the Metropolitan area and 
provided an opportunity to publicize the services available to 
the disabled. 

The Eastern Shore achieved the highest average in the State 
in the number of clients rehabilitated by each counselor. There 
was continued cooperation in this district with public schools, 
one of the most fruitful sources of referral. The employer advis- 



86 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



ory groups, sponsored jointly by the Maryland State Employ- 
ment Service and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation in 
Cecil, Wicomico, and Worcester counties continued to be the 
instrumentality for the placement of numbers of handicapped 
workers. 



Disability Determination Program 

In the Disability Determination Unit, the program activity 
increased 20 percent during the past year. Social Security for- 
v^arded 9,246 claims of various types, v^hile State Agency action 
v^as completed in 9,041 cases. A backlog of 896 claims, or the 
equivalent of 1.1 month's work, remained on hand. New claims 
constituted 68.5 percent of the work load, divided between 5,915 
disabled adults and 418 disabled child applicants. Reconsidera- 
tion of previously denied claims was requested by 890 persons. 
Social Security forwarded 948 claims for investigation to deter- 
mine whether periods of disability should continue. Other case 
receipts covered a wide variety of requests for clarification de- 
velopment such as that initiated by other states, Social Security 
Hearing Examiners, the Appeals Council, and by reviewing auth- 
orities in Social Security's Division of Disability Operations. 
From these claims 475 were selected for referral to Vocational 
Rehabilitation as potential clients. The Social Security Admin- 
istration reported 11,735 residents of Maryland were receiving 
benefits monthly in the amount of $1,061,827. The economic sig- 
nificance of Social Security payments to disabled workers is 
obvious. 

Another development in the Disability Determination Pro- 
gram was an innovation to achieve more objective evaluation of 
impairments. In the evaluation of cardiovascular impairment, a 
beginning was made in having the impaired individual demon- 
strate physical function by walking, stair climbing, and carry- 
ing weights as a feature of the examination. This has been de- 
fined as a physical activity assessment. The findings of the as- 
sessment are related to work activity level definitions commonly 
used by the Maryland State Employment Service. When indi- 
cated, this may be carried one step further with analysis by a 
vocational expert who considers functional limitation and per- 
sonal assets to recommend specific jobs within an individual's 
range of employability. These refinements may have some impli- 
cation for the general Vocational Rehabilitation Program. 

Other Disability Determination Program activities initiated 
in the past year include scheduled training periods for Social 
Security District Office personnel in the more sophisticated as- 
pects of documenting disability claims by State Agency instruc- 
tors. Conversely, arrangements were made for the training of 
Disability Determination personnel by Social Security staff mem- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



87 



bers in the legal and technical aspects of Social Security. Al- 
though the adjudication of disability claims is highly specialized, 
changing medical procedures, legal interpretations, and the tech- 
nical problems require constant adjustment in evaluation tech- 
niques which minimizes any routine. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



TABLE 1 — Actual Days Schools Were Open: Opening and Closing Dates: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1964-65 





Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Number 


Date of 


Date of 




of Actual 


Opening 


Closing 




of Actual 


Opening 


Closing 


Local Unit 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 


Local Unit 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 




Schools 


September, 


June, 




Schools 


September, 


June, 




Were Open 


1964 


1965 




Were Open 


1964 


1965 


Allegany 


185 


1 


11 


Harford 


180 


9 


15 


Anne Arundel. 


185 


3 


16 




183 


3 


11 


Baltimore City 


183 


9 


17 


Kent 


181 


8 


17 




183 


3 


16 










Calvert 


183 


3 


11 


Montgomery . 


184 


2 


17 










Pr. George's . . 


184 


8 


17 


Caroline 


181 


8 


15 


Queen Anne's. 


182 


3 


11 


Carroll 


182 


9 


15 


St. Mary's 


184 


3 


11 


Cecil 


184 


8 


17 




182 


8 


9 




182 


2 


11 




Dorchester .... 


181 


8 


11 


Talbot 


101 


8 


10 










Washington . . 


183 


8 


11 




184 


8 


18 


Wicomico. . . . 


184 


8 


10 


Garrett 


183 


2 


10 


Worcester .... 


181 


8 


11 



90 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 2— Fall Enrollment— Grades N-12, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools: 
Public and Nonpublic: State of Maryland: 1964-65 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


High 


ENROLLMENT 


Total 

Public 

Nonpublic 

Campus Schools at State Colleges. 


884,190 

735,242 
147,826 
1,122 


542,913 
423,200 
118,621 
1,122 


341,277 
312,042 
29,205 


teaching staff 


Total 


38,255 
32,479 
5,728 
47 






Public 


17,036 


15,443 


Campus Schools at State Colleges. 


47 




NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 


Public 

Campus Schools at State Colleges. 


*1,641 
*1,128 
*508 
*5 


1,339 
878 
456 

5 


411 
299 
111 



* Excludes duplicates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



91 



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108 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



Epileptic 




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Emotion- 
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Defect 


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Mentally 
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Year 
Local Unit 





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112 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 24^Pupil Withdrawals* from Public Schools; Counties of Maryland; 1964-65 



Local Unit 


Total 


Withdrawals by CoDEf 


Transferred to 
Other Schools 


W5 


W6 


W7 


W8 


W9 


WIO 


Wll 


W12 


W13 


W14 


Wl 


W2 


W3&4 


ELEMENTARY 




26,226 


10,267 


370 


14,850 


234 




82 


34 


27 


309 


5 


1 


47 






683 


297 


5 


361 


5 




1 






11 






3 




Anne Arundel . . . 


3,201 


1,100 


25 


2,003 


28 




14 


h 


2 


18 






4 




Baltimore 


3,844 


1,321 


54 


2,323 


66 




4 


1 


2 


63 


'2 




8 






1 Q9 


4o 










o 


q 





A 




£t 




1 




Caroline 


128 


31 




85 


2 




1 


1 




8 










Carroll 


463 


194 


3 


244 


8 




2 




■4 


8 










Cecil 


900 


313 


9 


551 


9 




3 


'2 




10 






'2 




Charles 


499 


122 


2 


361 


3 




2 


1 


'2 


6 










Dorchester 


141 


41 




93 






2 




1 


2 






"2 




Frederick 


790 


373 


4 


392 


4 








2 


13 






2 




Garrett 


170 


46 




106 


3 






"7 




7 






1 




Harford 


1,397 


527 


10 


812 


13 




'4 




6 


23 






2 




Howard 


476 


82 


9 


367 


5 




3 






7 






3 




Kent 


108 


23 




83 












1 










Montgomery. . . . 


4,257 


1,776 


157 


2,252 


11 




13 


3 


2 


39 






4 




Prince George's . 


6,126 


2,864 


61 


3,083 


38 




20 


3 




46 






11 




Queen Anne's. . . 


143 


36 


1 


104 








1 




1 










St. Mary's 


693 


169 


12 


488 


i4 






1 


i 


4 










Somerset 


134 


45 




78 


3 






1 




4 




i 


i 




Talbot 


144 


40 


1 


93 


1 










8 










Washington 


929 


511 


9 


385 


6 






'2 


i 


12 






i 




Wicomico 


584 


290 


4 


266 


11 








1 


9 






2 




Worcester 


224 


23 




192 


1 






i 


1 


5 










HIGH 


Total Counties 


17,159 


2,737 


117 


6,221 


264 


331 


482 


5,302 


34 


921 


65 


630 


43 


12 


Allegany 


436 


56 


6 


167 


11 


12 


12 


108 




20 


2 


42 






Anne Arundel. . . 


2,061 


210 


13 


771 


40 


34 


80 


725 


'4 


121 




60 


■3 






2,796 


370 


17 


936 


74 


107 


73 


982 


3 


96 


i4 


120 


4 




Calvert 


159 


1 




70 




2 


1 


67 




11 




7 






Caroline 


118 


10 




37 


1 


1 


2 


48 




16 




2 




1 


Carroll 


345 


44 




123 


23 


2 


3 


116 




15 


3 


15 


i 




Cecil 


510 


64 


i 


152 


4 


10 


20 


191 


'2 


18 


3 


45 






Charles 


296 


21 


4 


95 




9 


14 


112 


1 


21 


4 


12 


'3 




Dorchester 


151 


5 




55 




1 


6 


57 




15 


2 


8 


2 




Frederick 


549 


89 


1 


136 


8 


7 


7 


212 


8 


34 


9 


32 


4 


2 


Garrett 


120 


2 




46 




3 


1 


38 




11 


2 


16 




1 




792 


138 


3 


340 


io 


4 


17 


195 


3 


38 


9 


32 


i 


2 


Howard 


330 


16 


1 


153 


3 


4 


7 


111 




18 


1 


13 


3 




Kent 


80 


7 




23 




2 


5 


32 




3 




7 


1 




Montgomery. . . . 


2,705 


620 


45 


1,103 


33 


38 


54 


549 


12 


176 


10 


51 


8 


6 


Prince George's . 


3,769 


895 


17 


1,291 


26 


68 


117 


1,092 




162 


4 


90 


7 




Queen Anne's. . . 


161 


5 


2 


56 


2 


3 


3 


66 




12 




11 


1 




St. Mary's 


331 


12 


4 


177 


3 


4 


7 


97 




12 


'2 


11 


2 






130 


7 




49 


7 


2 


2 


50 




7 




6 






Talbot 


131 


6 




49 


1 


2 


15 


42 




13 




3 






Washington 


603 


127 


2 


156 


8 


2 


19 


241 




28 




19 


i 






364 


27 


1 


148 


6 


12 


17 


106 


i 


31 




14 


1 






222 


5 




88 


4 


2 




65 




43 




14 


1 





* Withdrawals who did not re-enter during 1964-65 the school from which they withdrew — excluding kindergarten, 
t Codes: Wl — Transferred — public school in county W 8 — Age 16 or over 

W2 — Transferred — nonpublic school in county W 9 — Mental 

W3 & 4 — Transferred — outside county WIO — Physical 

W5 — Special case Wll — Economic 

W6 — Armed services W12 — Marriage 

W7— Committed to institution W13— Death 

W14 — Suspended 



Maryland State Department of Education 



113 



TABLE 25^ — Number and Per Cent Nonpromotions: Maryland County High 
School Pupils: June Net Roll, 1965 









Not Promoted 


Local Unit 


Total 


Promoted 












Number 


Per Cent 


Total Counties 


232,808 


224,330 


8,478 


3.6 


Allegany 


8,522 


8,367 


155 


1.8 




21,997 


20,960 


1,037 


4.7 




47,960 


46,395 


1,565 


3.3 


Calvert 


1,937 


1,893 


44 


2.3 




2,099 


2,075 


24 


1.1 


Carroll 


5,421 


5,328 


93 


1.7 


Cecil 


4,143 


3,924 


219 


5.3 


Charles 


3,668 


3,395 


273 


7.4 




2,920 


2,697 


223 


7.6 




7,238 


7,023 


215 


3.0 




2,139 


2,093 


46 


2.1 




8,640 


8,233 


407 


4.7 




4,536 


4,397 


139 


3.1 


Kent 


1,483 


1,322 


161 


10.9 




43,079 


42,138 


941 


2.2 




41,678 


39,650 


2,028 


4.9 




1,726 


1,633 


93 


5.4 




2,861 


2,701 


160 


5.6 




1,956 


1,840 


116 


5.9 


Talbot 


1,900 


1,803 


97 


5.1 


Washington 


9,564 


9,346 


218 


2.3 




4,793 


4,640 


153 


3.2 




2,548 


2,477 


71 


2.8 



Note: Policy of promotion and nonpromotion varies in the different counties. 



114 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 26 — Number, Per Cent, and Causes of Nonpromotion : Maryland 
County Elementary Pupils*: June Net Roll, 1965 





Total 
not 
PromotG(3 


Per Cent 

not 
Promoted 


Number not Promoted by 


Cause 


Personal 
Illness 


Irregular 
Atten- 
dancet 


Imma- 
turity t 


All ntlior 
All WLIlcr 

Causes 


Total Counties 


12,366 


4 


2 


106 


287 


10,686 


1,287 




119 


1 


2 


4 


3 


110 


2 




1,643 


5 


2 


13 


49 


1,559 


22 




3,723 


6 


5 


25 


25 


2,804 


869 


Calvert 


328 


10 


9 




12 


265 


51 




75 


2 


8 




1 


74 




Carroll 


264 


3 


8 


■ i 


5 


258 




Cecil 


438 


7 





6 


9 


423 




Charles 


291 


5 


7 


1 


23 


266 


■ 'i 


Dorchester 


71 


2 





1 


7 


63 




Frederick 


58 





7 


1 


4 


52 


1 


Garrett 


120 


4 


2 


3 


3 


111 


3 


Harford 


722 


6 


2 


5 


13 


641 


63 




125 


2 


2 


2 


2 


121 




Kent 


209 


10 


5 


1 




157 


"si 


Montgomery 


988 


2 





9 


35 


740 


204 


Queen Anne's 


1,712 


3 





18 


53 


1,638 


3 


19 





8 


1 




18 




St. Mary's 


394 


8 


7 


1 


26 


371 


* '2 




208 


8 


5 


3 


3 


194 


8 


Talbot 


178 


7 


3 


2 


7 


166 


3 




225 


2 


1 


7 


1 


213 


4 




378 


5 


6 


1 


6 


371 






78 


2 


3 


1 


6 


71 





* Excludes kindergarten and pupils attending campus schools at State colleges, 
t Irregular attendance due to unfortunate home conditions. 
t Immaturity — .social, intellectual, emotional. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



TABLE 27 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade*: 
Counties of Maryland: June Net Roll, 1965 



Local Unit 


First Grade Enrollment 


Number and Per Cent not Promoted 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties . . 


52,990 


27,709 


25,281 


4,697 


2,953 


1,744 


8.9 


10.7 


6.9 


Allegany 


1,346 


689 


657 


68 


40 


28 


5.1 


5.8 


4.3 


Anne Arundel . 


5,977 


3,214 


2,763 


755 


472 


283 


12.6 


14.7 


10.2 


Baltimore 


10,174 


5,278 


4,896 


1,061 


668 


393 


10.4 


12.7 


8.0 


Calvert 


495 


262 


233 


60 


32 


28 


12.1 


12.2 


12.0 




476 


258 


218 


44 


28 


16 


9.2 


10.9 


7.3 




1,287 


673 


614 


123 


90 


33 


9.5 


13.4 


5.4 


Cecil 


1,300 


688 


612 


243 


149 


94 


18.7 


21.7 


15.3 


Charles 


1,014 


542 


472 


102 


67 


35 


10.1 


12.4 


7.4 


Dorchester. . . . 


622 


318 


304 


26 


19 


7 


4.2 


6.0 


2.3 




1,522 


770 


752 


30 


20 


10 


2.0 


2.6 


1.3 


Garrett 


496 


273 


223 


41 


24 


17 


8.3 


8.8 


7.6 


Harford 


2,169 


1,128 


1,041 


240 


156 


84 


11.1 


13.8 


8.1 


Howard 


1,030 


551 


479 


71 


44 


27 


6.9 


8.0 


5.6 


Kent 


390 


202 


188 














Montgomery. . 


7,786 


4,029 


3,757 


375 


243 


132 


4.8 


6.0 


3.5 


Prince George's 


10,913 


5,668 


5,245 


912 


565 


347 


8.3 


10.0 


6.6 


Queen Anne's . 


479 


265 


214 














St. Mary's. . . . 


915 


497 


418 


iii 


'83 


"58 


15.' 4 


16.7 


1319 




454 


254 


200 


83 


50 


33 


18.3 


19.7 


16.5 


Talbot 


447 


246 


201 


69 


43 


26 


15.4 


17.5 


12.9 


Washington. . . 


1,897 


982 


915 


70 


47 


23 


3.7 


4.8 


2.5 




1,195 


617 


578 


144 


87 


57 


12.1 


14.1 


9.9 




606 


305 


301 


39 


26 


13 


6.4 


8.5 


4.3 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of campus schools at State colleges. 



116 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 28— Public High School Graduates: State of Maryland : 1955-56—1964-65 



Year 



High School Graduates 



Local Unit 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1955-56 


16,767 


8,019 


8,748 


1956-57 


17,122 


8,368 


8,754 


1957-58 


18,380 


8,891 


9,489 


1958-59 


20,462 


9,861 


10,601 


1959-60 


23,854 


11,560 


12,294 


1960-61 


26,923 


13,142 


13,781 


1961-62 


26,533 


13,015 


13,518 


1962-63 


28,534 


14,299 


14,235 


1963-64 


34,271 


17,049 


17,222 


1964-65 


41,331 


20,149 


21,182 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1964-65 





1,462 


736 


726 




2,948 


1,418 


1,530 




7,590 


3,630 


3,960 


Baltimore 


7,233 


3,512 


3,721 


Calvert 


247 


106 


141 




275 


133 


142 


Carroll 


832 


405 


427 


Cecil 


555 


267 


288 




438 


195 


243 




424 


210 


214 




1,054 


529 


525 




301 


152 


149 




1,238 


567 


671 




588 


288 


300 


Kent 


196 


90 


106 


Montgomery 


6,591 


3,248 


3,343 


Prince George's 


5,854 


2,901 


2,953 




203 


98 


105 




359 


176 


183 




263 


132 


131 




272 


142 


130 




1,460 


737 


723 




625 


313 


312 




323 


164 


159 



Maryland State Department 



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Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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159 



TABLE 58 — Driver Education Enrollment: Maryland Public High Schools: 

Fall of 1964 



Local Unit 



Total Driver 
Education 



Driver Education 



Classroom 



Practice 



Classroom 

and 
Practice 



Total State. 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel*. . 
Baltimore City*. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 



Caroline. . . . 

Carroll* 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester* . 



Frederick . 
Garrett. . , 
Harford. . 
Howard* . 
Kent 



Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset* 



Talbot 

Washington . 
Wicomico. . . 
Worcester . . . 



11,565 

505 



1,354 
30 

331 

455 
93 



489 
338 
700 

157 

3,380 
1,782 
351 
283 



110 
339 
748 
120 



3,424 



237 
30 



291 



455 
52 



489 

12 

'74 

1,020 
41 
80 
50 



493 
100 



782 



240 
40 



12 



317 
41 
80 



7,359 
505 

sii 



41 



338 
676 



2,043 
1,700 
191 
233 



52 



110 
339 
203 
20 



*Driver Education in these units is oflered during out-of-school hours only. 

TABLE 59 — Special Education Enrollment: Maryland Public High Schools: 

Fall of 1964 



Local Unit 



Total 
Special 
Education 



Special Education 



Junior 
High 



Senior 
High 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. 
Baltimore City . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



12,387 

33 
944 
6,224 
1.006 



176 
277 
137 
14 

59 

207 
455 
294 

890 
590 

i43 



535 
73 
330 



10,715 



657 
6,224 
440 



176 
247 
137 
14 

59 

iso 

455 
294 

663 
494 

i43 



343 
42 
114 



1,672 

28'r 
566 



30 



27 



227 
96 



192 
31 
216 



160 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 60 — Number of Different Individuals Teaching and Number of Public High 
Schools Offering Each Subject; State of Maryland; Fall of 1964 





































Business 


Arts 




English 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Other 


Social 


Mathe- 


Science 


Educa- 


and 




















Lan- 


Studies 


matics 






tion 


Crafts 


Local Unit 


















guages 
























T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


i otal otate 


o,4U/ 


000 


1 QO 

toy 




/IRQ 
400 


ooo 


000 


lift 
1 Id 


44 


39 


2,707 


285 


1,810 


294 


1,935 


292 


994 


185 


74 


56 




90 


11 


5 


3 


9 


7 


3 


2 






78 


11 


54 


11 


49 


11 


35 


8 


4 


4 


Anne Arundel 


314 


17 


5 


5 


28 


14 


6 


4 


*2 


*2 


175 


15 


100 


15 


108 


15 


66 


10 


7 


3 


Baltimore City 


531 


42 


26 


19 


88 


35 


41 


20 


*18 


*13 


446 


42 


356 


42 


322 


41 


222 


38 






Baltimore 


588 


35 


18 


18 


76 


35 


56 


34 


t6 


t8 


542 


35 


256 


35 


286 


35 


121 


18 


3 


3 


Calvert 


31 


4 


1 


1 


4 


3 










26 


4 


17 


4 


16 


4 


11 


2 


2 


2 




35 


8 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 






23 


8 


18 


8 


22 


8 


15 


3 






Carroll 


59 


11 


1 


1 


10 


8 


1 


1 






49 


11 


42 


11 


42 


11 


27 


7 


'2 


'2 


Cecil 


44 


6 


1 


1 


3 


3 


2 


2 






40 


6 


29 


6 


34 


6 


24 


5 


2 


2 




40 


6 


1 


1 


6 


3 










35 


6 


24 


6 


26 


6 


18 


4 


3 


3 


Dorchester 


31 


7 


3 


3 


4 


3 










30 


7 


24 


7 


24 


7 


12 


4 


3 


3 




101 


9 


7 


6 


9 


7 


2 


2 


+1 

+1 


+1 
+i 


91 


8 


53 


9 


50 


9 


30 


6 


11 


6 


Garrett 


90 


5 






3 


2 










24 


5 


16 


5 


16 


5 


8 


2 


7 


5 


Harford 


110 


9 


5 


5 


13 


7 


5 


2 






104 


9 


63 




63 


9 


39 


7 




6 




46 


7 


2 


2 


10 


7 


3 


2 










25 


7 


32 


7 


14 


3 


2 


2 


Kent 


16 


4 


2 


2 


4 


4 










20 


'4 


IS 


4 


14 


4 


11 


4 


2 


2 


Montgomery 


508 


35 


32 


30 


114 


33 


26 


13 


*9 


*8 


309 


33 


266 


33 


249 


33 


100 


15 


9 


6 




498 


40 


9 


9 


45 


28 


42 


25 


t7 


t5 


445 


39 


231 


40 


389 


39 


129 


14 


2 


1 


Queen Anne's 


23 


4 






4 


4 










22 


4 


18 


4 


17 


4 


11 


4 


2 


2 


St. Mary's 


29 


6 


1 


1 


4 


4 


2 


2 






29 


6 


24 


6 


27 


6 


12 


5 






Somerset 


24 


7 






6 


5 










27 


7 


21 


7 


22 


7 


16 


6 


i 


i 


Talbot 


19 


3 


1 


1 


4 


2 










17 

88 


3 


14 


3 


14 


3 


7 


3 


^Ya^hi;u'to'l 


94 


12 


9 


6 


9 


7 


4 


2 


*1 


*2 


12 


80 


12 


70 


12 


32 


7 


1 


'i 


AYiconiir'O 


56 


6 


3 


3 


8 


6 


6 


4 






55 


6 


41 


6 


44 


p. 


23 


6 


1 


1 


Worcester 


30 


4 


5 


4 














32 


4 


20 


4 


19 


4 


11 




1 


1 













































Home 


Phy 


:ical 














Adminis- 












Art 


Music 


A- 


ri- 


Eco- 


Educa- 


Industrial 


Dr 


ver 


Special 


tration, 


Guidance 


Library 












culture 


nomics 


tion 


Work 


Edu- 


Edu- 


.Super- 










Local Unit 


























cation 


cation 


vision 












T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


T 


S 


Total State 


499 


255 


720 


298 


65 


58 


682 


280 


1278 


304 


1097 


336 


130 


108 


451 


156 


696 


303 


705 


293 


350 


278 


Allegany 


9 


7 


21 


11 


1 




20 


9 


33 


11 


28 


13 


7 


6 


1 


1 


19 


10 


12 


8 


11 


8 


Anne Arundel. . . 


40 


17 


52 


17 


1 




47 


13 


78 


17 


49 


15 






24 


9 


44 




34 


16 


21 


16 


Baltimore City . . 


114 


41 


118 


50 






165 


44 


229 


49 


367 


48 






245 


42 


121 


M 


168 


51 


39 


37 


Baltimore 


92 


35 


113 


35 


i 




91 


35 


206 


35 


138 


47 


20 


17 


53 


28 


105 


35 


109 


35 


71 


35 


Calvert 


3 


3 


7 


4 


1 




5 


3 


12 


4 


5 


4 


1 


1 






13 


4 


8 


4 


5 


4 


Caroline 


6 


7 


13 


8 


3 


3 


8 


8 


19 


8 


9 


8 


3 


3 






11 


8 


9 


8 


8 


8 


Carroll 


7 


5 


22 


11 


5 


4 


16 


10 


33 


11 


21 


9 






'6 


'2 


20 


11 


14 


10 


10 


10 


Cecil 


6 


6 


10 


6 


2 


2 


10 


6 


23 


6 


14 


8 


7 


'5 


7 


6 


13 


6 


9 


6 


7 


6 


Charles 


3 


3 


12 


6 


4 


3 


10 


6 


16 


6 


11 


8 


5 


3 


2 


1 


11 


6 


9 


6 


6 


6 


Dorchester 


5 


5 


11 


7 


2 


2 


6 


5 


18 


7 


6 


4 


1 


1 


1 


1 


12 


7 


6 


4 


5 


5 


Frederick 


11 


9 


27 




6 


5 


16 


9 


38 


9 


17 


9 


5 


6 


4 


4 


18 


9 


17 


9 


10 


9 


Garrett 


1 


1 


5 


1 


3 


2 


5 


2 


11 


4 


4 


2 


1 


2 






7 


5 


3 


2 


6 


4 




10 


8 


21 


9 


3 


2 


17 


8 


31 


9 


24 


9 


7 


7 


'9 


I 


19 


9 


15 


8 


9 


8 


Howard 


8 


6 


15 




1 


1 


12 
6 


6 


16 


7 


16 


7 






8 




14 


7 


13 


7 


9 


7 


Kent 


1 


1 


7 


4 


2 


2 


4 


9 


4 


5 


4 


'3 


'4 


4 


4 


7 


4 


6 


4 


4 


4 


Montgomery. . . . 


71 


33 


83 


34 


4 


4 


71 


34 


197 


34 


166 


54 


25 


14 


29 


13 


100 


34 


110 


34 


44 


33 


Prince George's. . 


82 


40 


106 


39 


6 


4 


111 


39 


197 


41 


129 


43 


20 


14 


31 


17 


100 




103 


40 


44 


39 


Queen Anne's. . . 






5 


4 


3 


3 


5 


4 


9 


4 


3 


3 


4 


4 






5 


1 


5 

8 




5 


4 


St. Mary's 


'6 


'6 


10 


6 


2 


2 




6 


17 


6 


8 


6 


4 


5 


■4 


'4 


11 






6 


6 




1 


2 


5 


5 


2 


2 


4 


4 


15 


7 


3 


3 










8 


6 


7 


6 


5 


5 


Talbot 




5 


3 


2 


2 


5 


3 


8 


3 


5 


3 


2 


2 






6 


3 


4 


3 


4 


3 


Washington 


i3 


ii 


30 


12 


5 


4 


26 


12 


34 


12 


39 


15 


8 


6 


14 


'8 


16 


12 


21 


12 


11 


11 


Wicomico 


7 


6 


13 


6 


3 


4 


11 


6 


18 


6 


23 


10 


4 


5 


6 


4 


11 


6 


10 


6 


6 


6 


Worcester 


3 


4 


9 


4 


3 


3 


8 


4 


11 


4 


7 


4 


3 


3 


3 


1 


5 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 



Note: T=Teachers; S=Schools. 



t Includes 4 teachers and 4 schools teaching German and 2 teachers and 4 schools teaching Russian in Baltimore County; includes 

5 teachers and 4 schools teaching German and 2 teachers and 1 school teaching Russian in Prince George's County. 
± Russian. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



161 



TABLE 61 — Average Number of Pupils Belonging per Teacher 
and Principal: State of Maryland: 1955-56 — 1964-65 



Average Number Belonging per Teacher 



Year 




AND Principal 




Local Unit 










Total 


Elementary* 


High 


1955-56 


26.8 


30.4 


22.0 


1956-57 


26.3 


30.0 


21.7 


1957-58 


25.1 


28.0 


21.5 


1958-59 


24.6 


27.3 


21.4 


1959-60 


24.2 


26.9 


21.2 


1960-61 


23.9 


26.6 


21.0 


1961-62 


25.1 


28.2 


21.9 


1962-63 


23.1 


25.7 


20.3 


1963-64 


23.3 


25.9 


20.5 


1964-65 


21.9 


23.9 


19.9 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1964-65 



Allegany 


24 


2 


25 


9 


22 


7 




22 




23 


4 


20 


6 


Baltimore City 


22 


3 


24 





20 


3 


Baltimore 


21 


3 


23 


2 


19 


5 


Calvert 


22 


5 


24 


7 


19 


9 


Caroline 


21 


3 


29 


6 


15 


7 


Carroll 


22 


7 


25 


9 


19 


7 


Cecil 


23 


6 


26 


3 


20 


5 




22 


4 


24 


9 


19 


6 


Dorchester 


23 


8 


26 


8 


21 


1 


Frederick 


21 


3 


22 


6 


19 


9 


Garrett 


25 


3 


26 


1 


24 


3 


Harford 


23 


2 


25 





21 


2 




22 


1 


24 


1 


20 





Kent 


20 


3 


23 


6 


17 


1 




20 


4 


22 


3 


18 


6 


Prince George's 


22 





23 


8 


19 


9 


22 


1 


25 


2 


18 


9 


St. Mary's 


22 


9 


26 


7 


18 




Somerset 


22 


4 


25 


4 


19 


6 


Talbot 


22 


9 


25 


1 


20 


5 




22 


9 


25 


1 


20 


9 




22 


9 


26 


3 


19 


4 




23 


4 


26 


9 


20 


1 



♦Excludes kindergarten and campus schools at State Colleges 



162 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 62 — Number and Per Cent of Schools, Teachers, Pupils: One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools: Counties of Maryland: 1922-23 — 1964-65 



One-Teacher Elementary Schools* 



Year 


















Number of 


Per Cent of 


Per Cent of 


Pupils in One- 


Per Cent of 


Local Unit 


One-Teacher 


Total Ele- 


Total Ele- 


Teacher 


Total Ele- 




Schools 


mentary 


mentary 


Schools 


mentary 






Schools 


Teachers 




Pupils 


1922-23 


1,496 


69 


9 


39 


6 


t 




1927-28 


1,206 


65 


1 


31 


7 


t 




1932-33 


740 


53 


2 


20 


3 


t 




1937-38 


560 


48 


1 


15 


4 


t 




1942-43 


275 


31 


4 


7 


8 


7,456 


'5.'8 


1955-56 


24 


3 


7 





3 


595 


0.3 


1956-57 


23 


3 


9 





3 


584 


0.3 


1957-58 


17 


2 


1 





3 


410 


0.2 


1958-59 


11 


1 


2 





1 


278 


0.1 


1959-60 


12 




8 





1 


300 


0.1 


1960-61 


10 


1 


3 





1 


281 


0.1 


1961-62 


10 


1 


5 





1 


267 


0.1 


1962-63 


9 


1 


3 





1 


196 


0.1 


1963-64 


10 


1 


2 




t 


226 


t 


1964-65 


9 


1 







t 


180 


X 


BY LOCAL UNIT, 1964-65 




6 


28 


6 


4 


6 


119 


3.4 




1 


7 


1 





9 


30 


1.1 


Somerset 


1 


9 


1 


1 





12 


0.5 


Talbot 


1 


9 


1 







19 


0.8 



♦Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more. 
tData unavailable. 
XLess than 0.1 per cent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



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164 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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166 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 

TABLE 66— Number of Public Schools by Size of Staff: State of Maryland: 1964-65 



Number of 
Teachers 

AND 

Principals 







5 






1 


o 

a 


a 






m 


m 













s 










m 










o 
O 


<v 
■a 


a) 


c« 


i 


P 




O 


a 















B 






O 

o 


a 
< 


'>» 




ince 


leen 


Ma 


m 

a 




a 







ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1—6) 



All Schools. 



LO— 1.9 


2.0—2.9 


3 


3 9 


4 


0—4.9 


5 


0—5.9 


6 


0—6.9 


7 


0—7.9 


8 


0—8.9 


9 


0—9.9 


10 


0— 10.< 


11 


0— ll.( 


12 


0— 12.< 


13 


0— 13.< 


14 


0— 14.< 


15 


0— 15.< 


16 


0—16. 


17 


0—17. 


18 


0-18. < 


19 


0—19. 


20 


0—20. 


21 


0—21. 


22 


0—22. 


23 


0—23. 


24 


0—24. 


25 


0— 25.< 


26 


0—26. 


27 


0—27. 


28 


0—28. 


29 


0—29. 


30 


0—30. 


31 


0—31. 


32 


0—32. 


33 


0—33. 


34 


0—34. 


35 


and 



878 


29 


65 


152 


92 


14 


9 


18 


17 


12 


21 


26 


17 


22 


12 


11 


108 


130 


10 


16 


16 


12 


35 


21 


9 




















6 




















1 


1 






18 










'3 




" j 






1 


i 




i 




'3 






i 




2 




1 




30 


2 




1 










i 




4 


3 








3 




i 


2 


i 


2 


i 


2 


'3 


21 


1 


1 


1 






i 


j 






1 


1 












1 






2 




5 


2 


26 


1 


2 


4 


i 




1 








2 




4 










2 




'3 


1 


i 


2 


1 


32 


2 


1 


2 




'2 






'2 






'2 


J 






'2 




2 


"i 


1 


3 


5 


3 


2 


24 


2 


4 






1 


'2 










1 




'2 






'2 


2 


1 


1 


1 




1 




29 


6 


2 


3 


'2 


2 






1 
















4 


3 




1 






1 


'i 


21 


1 


1 


2 


1 






2 








i 










2 


4 






i 




1 




27 


1 


1 


3 


3 


'2 






'2 






2 










3 


6 




'2 






1 


i 


43 




6 


9 


2 


1 




1 


1 






1 










6 


8 






i 




2 


1 


44 


"a 


2 


8 


3 






2 








2 




'2 






6 


7 


"i 


'3 


1 






2 


39 


3 


2 


4 




'2 






1 






1 








i 


5 


12 


1 








i 




43 




2 


8 


'3 








1 






1 




'2 




1 


13 


6 


1 








3 




28 




2 


4 


3 














1 




2 


1 




6 


3 


1 








3 




33 




4 


5 








'2 


1 






1 




2 


1 




2 


4 




i 






3 


i 


36 


i 


3 


4 


'2 








2 






1 




2 


1 




7 


5 




2 






3 


1 


34 


2 


1 


5 


2 








4 






1 










8 


4 












2 


35 


1 


1 


5 


1 














2 






'2 




10 


6 




1 






'2 


2 


18 




3 


2 


1 




















1 




4 


7 














32 




2 


7 


5 
























3 


11 














22 




1 


3 


3 




















'1 




1 


12 














26 




3 


1 


8 




















1 




4 


6 














20 




3 


1 


5 






2 


















2 


5 














24 




2 


9 


1 




















1 




6 


3 














21 




2 


9 


4 




















1 




1 


3 














18 




2 


10 




















i 






2 


1 














27 




1 


9 


ii 


















2 






4 
















14 




2 


5 


3 
























2 


'2 














19 




2 


4 


8 


























3 














10 




1 


2 


4 


















i 






i 
















17 




1 


5 


7 
























2 


'i 














9 




2 


4 


3 








































4 






3 


1 








































25 


1 


3 


10 


5 


















'3 






'2 

















JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS (7—12) 



All Schools 

1.0—2.9.... 

3.0— 4.9. ... 

5.0—6.9.... 

7.0—8.9.... 

9.0—10.9... 
11.0—12.9... 
13.0—14.9... 
15.0— 16.9.. . 
17.0—18.9... 
19.0—20.9. . . 
21.0—22.9... 
23.0— 24.9.. . 
25.0—29.9. . . 
30.0—34.9. . . 
35.0—39.9... 
40.0— 44.9.. . 
45.0—49.9... 
50.0—54.9. . . 
55.0—59.9. . . 
60.0—64.9. . . 
65.0—69.9... 
70.0—74.9... 
75.0—79.9... 
80.0—84.9. . . 
85.0—89.9. . . 
90.0—94.9... 
95.0—99.9... 
100.0 and over. 



299 


9 


17 


52 


35 


4 


8 


10 


6 


6 


5 


9 


5 


8 


6 


4 


34 


39 


4 


6 


7 


3 


12 


6 


3 






2 


































1 








3 












'2 




































2 
















































6 






1 






'2 




























'2 








5 












1 




































5 


1 




"3 










































7 


2 




2 
























i 










i 








6 




"1 


1 
















i 




1 




1 


















5 






1 




















1 






















5 






1 






























'1 


i 










11 






2 






1 
























1 




1 








10 




1 


1 
































'3 


1 




i 




17 






1 






1 




1 




1 


'2 














'2 


1 


1 




3 




17 






2 




i 


1 




2 












i 






'4 




1 






2 




25 




'2 


1 




1 






2 




i 


3 






1 






7 










1 




27 




1 


2 










1 




1 


1 




1 






'2 


11 














19 




2 


3 


























5 


4 












i 


14 






1 


3 


















'2 






3 


1 












2 


9 






1 


3 
























1 


3 












1 


19 




1 


2 


6 














i 




1 






6 


1 














12 








7 














1 










3 


1 














11 




i 


'2 


2 
























5 


1 














8 




2 




2 


















'2 








1 










i 




8 




2 




4 
























1 












1 




6 






'4 


1 


























i 














8 




1 


3 


1 
























'i 
















4 






1 


























3 
















27 




'3 


15 


'3 
























2 


'4 















Maryland State Department of Education 



167 



TABLE 67 — Number of Public Schools by Average Number of Pupils Belonging: 

State of Maryland: 1964-65 









"a! 


>> 




























jn 
"oj 






















-a 


O 


























>> 


bO 
















Average 
Number 


hools 


>, 
a 


Arun 


a> 
o 
a 


Baltimore 




a 








ester 


rick 




-a 


-a 




?omei 


O 

<u 

a 


Ann 


ary's 






ngtoi 


o 
'3 




Belonging 


AllSc 


Allega 


Anne 


Baltic 


Calve 


Caroli 


Carro: 


Cecil 


Charl 


Dorch 


Frede: 


1 Garre 


Harfo 


Howa 


Kent 


Monti 


Princ( 


Queen 


St. M 


Somer 


Talbo 


Washi 


Wicor 


Worce 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1—6) 





878 


29 


65 


152 


92 


14 


9 


18 


17 


12 


21 


26 


17 


22 


12 


11 


108 


130 


10 


16 


16 


12 


35 


21 


13 


30 or less 


13 


1 












1 






4 




1 










1 






2 


1 






2 


31—60 


23 


1 






2 




1 






3 


i 


3 


i 




"2 




2 


i 




1 


1 




61—90 


37 


2 


1 




1 


1 










5 


3 


1 






4 




3 


1 


i 


2 


'i 


2 


'3 


'2 


91—120 


24 


1 


1 




1 




1 




1 




2 


1 


3 








1 




2 




2 




4 


2 


1 


121—150 


24 


1 


4 




2 




1 










1 












"2 






2 


'4 


2 


3 


1 




27 


2 








2 


1 


2 


1 








3 






1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 








181—210 


31 


2 


2 




2 


2 






1 


'3 




'3 


1 


'2 






2 


3 




2 


1 




2 






211—240 


23 


5 


1 




2 


1 


1 






1 






1 








2 


3 




1 






3 


1 




241—270 


27 


2 


3 


2 


3 


1 


1 


'2 


1 






i 


1 








3 


1 






■j 




2 


2 




271—300 


34 


1 


4 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


2 


i 




3 










3 


4 




'2 




i 




1 


1 


301—330 


27 


3 


1 


2 


1 






1 


1 


2 














6 


6 










i 


1 




331—360 


40 


3 


1 


4 


2 


'2 




1 


1 








i 


"3 






7 


9 




'2 




i 








361—390 


27 




2 


1 


1 






2 






'2 


1 






3 


7 




1 




2 




2 


391—420 


39 




7 


6 


3 














2 


i 








7 


9 








i 


2 






421—450 


38 




1 


5 


4 














2 


1 


'2 






8 


9 








1 


1 






451—480 


40 




2 


5 


2 






"i 




'2 




1 




2 






8 


7 




"i 






3 


'2 


i 


481—510 


40 


2 


4 


6 


3 






2 


'2 






1 




1 






3 


7 




1 






3 


2 


1 


511—540 


30 


1 


3 


1 


4 








3 






1 










4 


7 




1 






1 


1 


1 


541—570 


38 


1 


2 


6 


6 








1 










i 






8 


8 










3 


1 




571—600 


26 




2 


2 


1 






i 








i 










5 


8 




i 










i 


601—660 


55 


i 


5 


6 


8 






2 


"i 






2 




'2 






8 


19 
















661—720 


37 




4 


9 


8 


















3 






7 


4 










i 






721—780 


40 




3 


12 


13 






i 




i 




i 










2 


5 










1 






781—840 


34 




4 


5 


8 






1 




1 














10 


3 
















841—900 


27 




3 


10 


8 


















'2 






3 


1 
















901—960 


18 




1 


8 


3 










i 








1 






3 


















961—1020 


15 






11 


2 
























2 


















1021—1080 


10 






9 


























1 


















1081—1140 


8 






7 


"i 










































1141—1200 


8 




i 


7 












































1201 and over 


18 






14 


'2 


















i 






1 



















JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS (7—12) 





299 

3 
5 
7 
7 
13 
4 
6 
10 
7 
8 
16 
19 
23 
21 
18 
16 
12 
15 
14 
9 
5 
5 
8 
4 

10 
8 
8 
2 
1 
4 

11 


9 


17 


52 


35 


4 


8 


10 


6 


6 


5 


9 


5 

2 
1 


8 


6 


4 


34 


39 


4 


6 


7 


3 


12 


6 


4 


50 or less 


51—100 






2 






2 
1 

2 


































101—150 


3 
















1 








2 










151—200 


'3 


1 
1 


2 
4 
1 
2 
3 




1 




1 






















1 






201—250 


1 


1 




2 




2 














251—300 






















1 




i 


1 




301—350 






























1 
1 


1 


351—400 




1 


1 


i 

2 

i 
1 
1 




1 










2 


1 






401—450 


1 










1 
1 


1 






2 


451—500 


1 

'2 
1 

1 
1 




2 




















3 
1 

i 


501-600 






1 
1 


'3 
1 
2 


1 


1 


2 










1 

'3 
2 

3 
3 
1 
4 
5 
4 


2 
6 
7 
5 
6 


2 


1 


3 
2 




"i 


601—700 


"2 
1 
2 

"i 
1 

'3 
1 
2 
1 
1 


2 
1 
1 

"i 

3 
2 

"1 
1 
1 

'4 
5 
3 
1 


1 
1 


1 
1 






1 


1 


701—800 


'2 
1 


1 

i 


3 
1 






801—900 


1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

i 








2 


i 
1 
1 
1 


901—1000 


1 

6 
2 
4 
6 
2 
3 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 














1001—1100 








1 


1 


1101—1200 






1 












3 
2 








1201—1300 










1 












1301—1400 














1 












1401—1500 














1 
1 
















1501—1600 






































1601—1700 








































1701—1800 














1 










2 
















1801—1900 
















2 






















1901—2000 






















2 
1 
2 












1 






2001—2100 


































2101—2200 
























1 
















2201—2300 


































1 






2301—2400 






































2401—2500 




3 
7 




























1 
2 
















2501 and over 


1 
























1 























































168 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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171 



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172 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 173 



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L Elementary (1 6) 


Less Than 
2 Years 
College 


Per 

Cent 


5.3 

8:3 

9.5 
4.9 

2:6 
5.8 
8.1 

4.5 

3.6 
21.4 

2.0 
2.0 
13.3 
16.1 
7.1 

7.7 
6.4 
6.4 
4.4 


Num- 
ber 


CO • C2 CO ■ • 1—1 CO 1/5 • CO • CO CO CO ^ ■<»i CO "-H 
1^ • »C ■ • ^ ^ 


2 3 Years 
College 


Per 
Cent 


9.7 

2.9 
20.1 
18.2 
7.8 
8.8 

17.6 
15.7 
7.7 
4.8 

7.5 

3:9 
19.0 
14.3 

6:2 
6.7 
11.3 

15.4 
9.7 
2.1 
8.6 


Num- 
ber 


«5 -HOcor^co cooo-«tico ■ «s -lococ^i -co^t^ • (m co ^ (m 

CO 1-H ■ . . . 


Bachelor's 
Degree 


Per 

Cent 


78.0 

97.1 
67.6 
65.3 
81.8 
79.4 

76.5 

82.3 
78.8 
83.9 
100.0 

71.6 
100.0 
86.7 
72.6 
64.3 

81.4 
87.0 

73.3 
69.4 
92.9 

69.2 
74.2 
87.2 
82.6 


•< 

s 


Num- 
ber 


cocooooooj i-i-^TTic -Hco 00— 1-*^ i^i^S 

CO (M CO CO CO CO 




Master's 
Degree and 
above* 




7.0 

4:6 

7.0 
5.5 
11.8 

5.9 

7:7 

3.2 
16.4 

4:7 

4.8 

16.6 
4.8 
6.7 
3.2 

7.7 
9.7 
4.3 
4.4 


Num- 
ber 


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174 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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176 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



8 h 



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178 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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189 



TABLE 89 — Withdrawals: Teachers and Principals: By Orjianizalion : 
Maryland Public Schools: Summer, 1964 and School Year, 1964-65 



Local Unit 


Total 


ElEMENTARY (1-6) 


High (7-12) 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total State 


*4,639 


15 


1 


2,591 


16 


7 


2,048 


.3 


5 




49 




1 


31 


10 


1 


18 


4 


7 




464 


20 





249 


19 


8 


215 


20 


3 




851 


12 


3 


516 


14 


5 


385 


10 







713 


14 


6 


390 


15 


9 


323 


13 


3 


Calvert 


55 


24 


7 


27 


23 


3 


28 


26 


2 


Caroline 


46 


20 


9 


21 


21 





25 


20 


8 


Carroll 


65 


11 


9 


27 


10 


2 


38 


13 


4 


Cecil 


76 


17 





41 


17 


1 


35 


16 


8 


Charles 


74 


18 


7 


43 


21 





31 


16 


2 




25 


9 


3 


4 


3 


1 


21 


15 


2 




84 


11 


3 


51 


13 


7 


33 


8 


9 


Garrett 


15 


7 


4 


7 


6 


8 


8 


8 


1 




158 


18 


2 


93 


20 


3 


65 


15 


9 




86 


18 


8 


52 


22 


4 


34 


15 





Kent 


23 


13 


7 


12 


15 





11 


12 


5 




671 


15 


2 


375 


17 


3 


296 


13 


2 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


831 


18 


9 


481 


21 


1 


350 


16 


4 


25 


13 


5 


11 


12 


1 


14 


14 


9 




74 


22 


8 


40 


24 


1 


34 


21 


5 




25 


12 


9 


13 


14 




12 


11 


9 


Talbot 


27 


14 


4 


8 


8 


4 


19 


20 


4 




93 


10 


9 


48 


11 


9 


45 


10 







74 


14 


5 


32 


12 


5 


42 


16 


5 




35 


13 


7 


19 


15 


2 


16 


12 


3 



* Includes transfers between units as follows: Total, 254; elementary, 122; high, 132. 



190 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 90 — Withdrawals: Elementary and High School Teachers and Principals 
(1-12): Maryland Public Schools: Summer, 1964, and School Year, 1964-65 



Local Unit 


Total 


Summer, 1964 


School Year, 1964-65 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total State 


*4,639 


15.1 


3,548 


11.6 


1,091 


3.5 


Allegany 


49 


7.1 


33 


4.8 


16 


2.3 




464 


20.0 


363 


15.6 


101 


4.4 


Baltimore City 


851 


12.3 


566 


8.2 


285 


4.1 


Baltimore 


713 


14.6 


585 


12.0 


128 


2.6 




55 


24.7 


53 


23.8 


2 


0.9 


Caroline 


46 


20.9 


38 


17.3 


8 


3.6 


Carroll 


65 


11.9 


59 


10.8 


6 


1.1 




76 


17.0 


60 


13.4 


16 


3.6 


Charles 


74 


18.7 


57 


14.4 


17 


4.3 


Dorchester 


25 


9.3 


23 


8.6 


2 


0.7 


Frederick 


84 


11.3 


70 


9.4 


14 


1.9 




15 


7.4 


12 


5.9 


3 


1.5 


Harford 


158 


18.2 


128 


14.2 


35 


4.0 




86 


18.8 


72 


15.7 


14 


3.1 


Kent 


23 


13.7 


20 


11.9 


3 


1.8 


Montgomery 


671 


15.2 


496 


11.2 


175 


4.0 


Prince George's 


831 


18.9 


622 


14.1 


209 


4.8 




25 


13.5 


24 


13.0 


1 


0.5 




74 


22.8 


61 


18.8 


13 


4.0 


Somerset 


25 


12.9 


24 


12.4 




0.5 


Talbot 


27 


14.4 


27 


14.4 








93 


10.9 


79 


9.3 


i4 


i.'e 




74 


14.5 


50 


9.8 


24 


4.7 


Worcester 


35 


13.7 


31 


12.1 


4 


1.6 



* Includes transfers between units as follows: Total, 254; summer, 1964, 248; school year, 1964-65, 6. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



191 



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192 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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TABLE 94— High School Equivalence: State of Maryland: 1955-56—1964-65 



Year 


Number of Applicants Who 


Total Number 
of 

Certificates 
Issued 


Completed 
Examination* 


Earned 
Certificate 


Earned Certificate 
through USAFIt 


1955-56 


1,476 


854 


967 


1,821 


1956-57 


1,603 


954 


740 


1,694 


1957-58 


1,802 


963 


837 


1,800 


1958-59 


1,681 


867 


722 


1,589 


1959-60 


1,850 


951 


712 


1,663 


1960-61 


1,940 


1,002 


833 


1,835 


1961-62 


2,327 


1,181 


719 


1,900 


1962 63 


2,595 


1,307 


746 


2,053 


1963-64 


3,015 


1,455 


747 


2,202 




3,274 


1,437 


672 


2,109 



* Includes re-tests. 

t United States Armed Forces Institute. 



Maryland State Department of Education 195 









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Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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207 



TABLE 105 — Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal: 
Public Schools of Maryland : 1922-23—1964-65 



Year 



Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal 



Elementary 



High 



1922-23 


$1,243 


$1,156 


$1,671 


1927-28 


1,408 


1,320 


1,830 


1932-33 


1,453 


1,398 


1,659 


1937-38 


1,556 


1,487 


1,784 


1942-43 


1,775 


1,648 


1,994 


1955-56 


4,465 


4,450 


4,482 


1956-57 


4,719 


4,684 


4,760 


1957-58 


4,944 


4,821 


5,092 


1958-59 


5,247 


5,079 


5,447 


1959-60 


5,493 


5,436 


5,556 


1960-61 


5,852 


5,715 


5,999 


1961-62 


6,009 


6,019 


6,184 


1962-63 


6,239 


6,147 


6,334 


1963-64 


6,416 


6,243 


6,605 


1964-65 


6,764 


6,576 


6,962 



208 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 





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Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

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Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

(Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Harford 

Kent 

Prince George's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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210 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 108 — Expenditures of Public Funds for Transportation: Cost per 
Public School Pupil Transported: Number and Per Cent Transported: 
Counties of Maryland*— 1955-56— 1964-65 : State of Maryland— 1964-65 



Year 




Pupils Transported 


Local Unit 


Amount 


Cost per 
Pupil 


Number 
Transported 


Per Cent 



COUNTIES OF MARYLAND, 1955-56—1964-65 



1955-56 


$6,039,827 


$32.91 


183,552 


55.5 


1956-57 


6,802,444 


35.41 


192,126 


55.5 


1957-58 


7,497,938 


37.12 


201,969 


55.4 


1958-59 


8,238,252 


38.24 


215,414 


55.8 


1959-60 


8,789,916 


38.47 


228,495 


56.1 


1960-61 


9,793,092 


41.68 


234,933 


54.9 


1961-62 


10,492,037 


41.55 


252,538 


55.0 


1962-63 


11,482,471 


43.02 


266,902 


54.7 


1963-64 


12,183,375 


43 . 05 


282,987 


54.4 


1964-65 


12,901,593 


43.48 


296,736 


54.2 


BY LOCAL UNIT, 1964-65 


Total State 


$13,392,565 


* 


299,913 


* 


Allegany 


440,179 


$51.12 


8,611 


51.0 


Anne Arimdel 


1,274,021 


39.95 


31,888 


58.9 


Baltimore City 


490,972 


* 


3,177 


* 


Baltimore 


1,753,796 


36.15 


48,508 


45.6 


Calvert 


334,851 


69.20 


4,839 


94.9 


Caroline 


277,233 


70.98 


3,906 


79.8 


Carroll 


458,303 


45.08 


10,167 


81.6 


Cecil 


372,456 


45.98 


8,100 


74.4 


Charles 


497,419 


60.49 


8,223 


91.4 


Dorchester 


331,669 


90.64 


3,659 


56.0 


Frederick 


454,449 


43.84 


10,366 


63.7 




381,675 


83.17 


4,589 


90.4 


Harford 


853,925 


54.19 


15,759 


76.6 


Howard 


446,878 


48.20 


9,272 


89.2 


Kent 


163,206 


64.38 


2,535 


72.6 


Montgomery 


1,396,173 


32.56 


42,874 


42.0 


Prince George's 


1,143,907 


26.71 


42,823 


41.8 


241,764 


66.49 


3,636 


86.7 


St. Mary's 


343,555 


49.50 . 


6,941 


87.8 


Somerset 


227,634 


75.68 


3,008 


66.9 


Talbot 


186,992 


73.82 


2,533 


57.0 


Washington 


541,671 


42.04 


12,885 


59.7 


Wicomico 


457,027 


65.24 


7,005 


59.0 


Worcester 


322,810 


70.04 


4,609 


73.9 



* Cost per pupil and per cent transported for Baltimore City are not shown because Baltimore City 
with 25.6 per cent of total State enrollment transports only 1.7 per cent of its pupils. 
Note: Enrollment figures used are those of September 30, 1964. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



211 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



213 



TABLE 111 — Participation and Reimbursement Paid: Special Milk Program: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1955-56 — 1964-65 





Number of 


Per Cent of 


Total Number 






Approved 


Total Schools 


of One-half 


Reimburse- 


Year 


Schools 


in State 


Pints Milk 


ment 




Participating 


Participating 


Reimbursable 


Paid 


Local Unit 


in Program 


in Program 








772 


82.2 


21,833,604 


$820,471 


1956-57 


818 


85.6 


26,390,908 


983,689 


1957-58 


874 


89.5 


28,715,326 


1,080,048 


1958-59 


914 


92.7 


36,390,152 


1,286,797 


1959-60 


943 


94.2 


35,555,378 


1,354,115 


1960-61 


960 


93.5 


37,398,754 


1,436,752 


1961-62 


978 


93.9 


42,251,724 


1,590,134 ■ 


1962-63 


1,014 


95.1 


45,931,042 


1,724,716 


1963-64 


1,049 


95.7 


47,566,203 


1,747,628 


1964-65 


1,075 


97.2 


49,707,130 


1,792,898 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1964-65 





32 


97 





1,094,599 


$42,419 


Anne Arundel 


81 


100 





5,209,316 


199,294 


Baltimore City 


189 


97 


4 


8,543,813 


248,284 




127 


100 





9,195,968 


354,137 


Calvert 


15 


93 


7 


276,403 


10,312 


Caroline 


11 


100 





190,588 


5,949 


CarroU 


25 


100 





617,390 


23,944 


Cecil 


20 


100 





587,457 


18,171 


Charles 


15 


93 




756,471 


28,440 




20 


76 


9 


284,433 


10,364 


Frederick 


33 


100 





751,739 


28,829 


Garrett 


18 


94 


7 


288,442 


10,797 




28 


100 





1,342,384 


40,968 


Howard 


18 


100 





1,138,231 


41,839 


Kent 


13 


100 





186,701 


7,029 


Montgomery 


131 


100 





7,448,556 


283,442 




165 


100 





8,687,504 


321,846 


13 


92 


9 


223,560 


8,391 




18 


94 


7 


521,148 


19,141 




12 


63 


1 


115,917 


3,873 


Talbot 


11 


78 


6 


210,357 


7,391 


Washington 


45 


100 





1,033,909 


39,990 




25 


100 





746,352 


28,247 




10 


71 


4 


255,892 


9,801 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



215 



TABLE 113 — Participation in and Types of Lunches Served: National School 
Lunch Program: Maryland Public Schools: 1964 — 65 



Local Unit 




I Number of 
Approved 
Schools 
Participating 
in Program 


Per Cent of 
Total Schools 

in State 
Participating 

in Program 


Average 
Daily 
Participation 


Per Cent of 
Total Average 
Number Be- 
longing in 
State 
Participating 
in Program 


Total 
Number of 
Type A* 
Lunches 
Served 


Total State 


941 


85 


.1 


254,621 


36 
69 


3 


42,996,716 




32 


97 


.0 


11,584 


3 


1,941,067 




81 


100 


.0 


16,322 


30 


3 


2,790,284 




104 


53 


.6 


24,851 


14 


6 


4,205,641 


Baltimore 


122 


96 


.1 


41,274 


39 





7,137,298 


Calvert 


11 


68 


.7 


1,695 


33 


9 


285,057 


Caroline 


9 


81 


.8 


2,742 


57 


5 


455,431 


Carroll 


25 


100 


.0 


6,945 


56 


1 


1,138,283 


Cecil 


20 


100 


.0 


4,385 


41 


2 


732,324 


Charles 


15 


93 


.7 


2,682 


30 


2 


429,939 




19 


73 


.1 


2,518 


38 


9 


410,156 




33 


100 


.0 


10,338 


64 


2 


1,739,757 




14 


73 


.7 


3,531 


70 


4 


595,010 




28 


100 


.0 


11,591 


56 


6 


1,907,382 




18 


100 


.0 


4,470 


43 


1 


745,882 




11 


84 


■6 


1,831 


52 




300,923 


Montgomery 


125 


95 


4 


36,311 


39 


1 


6,185,723 


Prince George's 


155 


93 


9 


44,810 


45 


3 


7,583,455 


10 


71 


4 


2,364 


57 


3 


396,147 


St. Marv's 


15 


78 


9 


3,054 


40 


1 


483,614 


Somerset 


8 


42 


1 


1,021 


23 


1 


170,451 


Talbot 


11 


78 


6 


1,692 


38 


5 


283,943 




44 


97 


8 


11,908 


57 


6 


1,957,253 




22 


88 





4,186 


35 


8 


706,582 


Worcester 


9 


64 


3 


2,516 


42 


2 


415,114 



♦Type A — ^ pt. milk, 2 oz. protein, K c. vegetable and /or fruit, 1 serving bread, 2 tsps. butter or 
fortified margarine. 



216 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 114 — Capital Outlay Expenditures: Maryland Local Boards of 

Education: 1964-65 



Local Unit 



Total 



Expenditures for Capital Outlay 



Elementary 



High 



Administration 
Buildings 



Community- 
Colleges 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore. . . . 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. 
St. Mary's. . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . , 
Wicomico. . . . 
Worcester. . . . 



$97,727,144 

2,783,901 
7,-593,410 
14,561,551 
12,629,576 
59,794 

39,897 
753,538 
1,132,255 
1,751,923 
3,000 

5,518,786 
215,535 
4,010,612 
1,974,439 
170,286 

12,976,383 
24,563,811 
224,637 
2,154,171 
8,122 

1,130,735 
1,800,704 
1,128,654 
541,424 



$33,627,510 

25,494 
2,366,992 
4,936,201 
5,368,695 

40,835 

18,059 
151,198 
213,975 
441,355 
3,000 

1,261,589 



1,455,623 
559,325 
12,811 

3,497,272 
9,761,460 

6,288 
898,054 

5,234 

302,330 
1,096,170 
720,446 
485,104 



$59,622,804 


$1,014,407 


$3,462,423 


2,746,751 
4,966,133 
7,244,377 
6,732,800 
17,718 


6,910 
66,832 
494,034 
73,586 

1,241 


4,746 
193,453 
1,886,939 
454,495 


21,838 
601,855 
783,159 
1,190,178 






485 
135,121 
7,539 


112,851 



4,254,939 
215,535 
2,084,863 
1,413,048 
157,475 

9,300,196 
14,551,224 
218,349 
1,256,117 
2,888 

828,405 
584,883 
394,199 
55,874 



14,980 
2,066 



141,929 
55,229 



14,009 
446 



2,258 
455'i46 



36,986 
195,898 



119,651 



Maryland State Department of Education 



217 



TABLE 115 — Value* of Maryland Public School Property per Pupil 
Belonging : 1964-65 





Total 


Elementary 


High 


Local Unit 
















Total 


Average 


Total 


Average 


Total 


Average 




Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Total State 


$971,494,040 


$1,357 


$448,353,313 


$1,096 


$523,140,727 


$1,704 


Allegany 


28,175,600 


1,685 


11,776,740 


1,456 


16,398,860 


1,899 


Anne Arundel . 


71,025,784 


1,319 


31,220,212 


995 


39,805,572 


1,771 


Baltimore Cityf 


182,023,394 


1,020 


92,885,790 


861 


89,137,604 


1,263 


Baltimore 


174,512,695 


1,650 


75,281,702 


1,318 


99,230,993 


2,041 


Calvert 


5,315,600 


1,063 


2,381,650 


790 


2,933,950 


1,477 


Caroline 


7,415,604 


1,539 


2,548,326 


946 


4,867,278 


2,291 


Carroll 


13,130,514 


1,060 


5,613,075 


815 


7,517,439 


1,367 


Cecil 


16,828,000 


1,582 


7,133,000 


1,123 


9,695,000 


2,262 


Charles 


11,362,650 


1,278 


5,607,750 


1,087 


5,754,900 


1,543 


Dorchester. . . . 


8,660,800 


1,339 


3,392,100 


967 


5,268,700 


1,781 


Frederick 


25,541,732 


1,587 


11,955,605 


1,379 


13,586,127 


1,836 




5,819,000 


1,161 


2,924,000 


1,027 


2,895,000 


1,336 


Harford 


32,441,250 


1,584 


18,414,474 


1,579 


14,026,776 


1,591 


Howard 


9,418,800 


909 


4,379,200 


762 


5,039,600 


1,093 


Kent 


4,199,200 


1,209 


1,659,400 


842 


2,539,800 


1,690 


Montgomery. . 


140,983,662 


1,447 


67,229,183 


1,246 


73,754,479 


1,697 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 


153,996,894 


1,527 


66,680,549 


1,138 


87,316,345 


2,066 


4,073,807 


987 


1,739,922 


738 


2,333,885 


1,319 


St. Mary's. . . 


7,902,630 


1,034 


3,513,985 


750 


4,388,645 


1,484 




4,785,508 


1,081 


1,939,365 


794 


2,846,143 


1,435 


Talbot 


8,016,989 


1,826 


3,586,565 


1,458 


4,430,424 


2,296 


Washington . . . 


27,360,400 


1,298 


14,041,500 


1,237 


13,318,900 


1,371 


Wicomico 


20,274,600 


1,732 


8,880,820 


1,305 


11,393,780 


2,326 


Worcester 


8,228,927 


1,365 


3,568,400 


1,046 


4,660,527 


1,782 



*?V alue based on 100 per cent of the insured valuation for each school building and the equipment thereof - 

Value of sites has been excluded. 
1 Baltimore City shows value of buildings and equipment as carried by the Bureau of Accounts and 

Disbursements; this valuation does not constitute the basis for insurance. 



218 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 116 — Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to 
Assessed Valuation: June 30, 1965 





School Bonded Indebtedness as of 


1964 Assessed 


Assessed 


Per Cent 






Tttxtt-1 QA IQ^IC; 
JUNE oU, lyoD 




Valuation 


Valuation 


School 


Local Unit 








Taxable at 


per Dollar 


Bonded In- 










Full Rate for 


of School 


debtedness 






County 


State 


County 


Bonded In- 


is of Assess- 




Total 


Bonds 


Loanf 


Purposes 


debtedness 


ed Valuation 


Total State 


$623,263,313 


$505,511,597 


$117,751,716 


$11,176,394,419 


$18 


5.6 


Allegany 


8,291,464 


4,845,000 


3,446,464 


222,083,576 


27 


3.7 


Anne Arundel. . . . 


49,030,346 


40,602,000 


8,428,346 


634,032,942 


13 


7.7 


Baltimore City 


*134,533,000 


*134,533,000 




2,832,631,221 


21 


4.7 


Baltimore 


*127,165,014 


*95,375,000 


31,790,014 


2,046,752,675 


16 


6.2 


Calvert 


2,458,270 


1,932,000 


526,270 


40,925,457 


17 


6.0 


Caroline 


2,736,013 


2,315,000 


421,013 


44,059,956 


16 


6.2 


Carroll 


1,427,951 




1,427,951 


176,916,045 


124 


0.8 


Cecil 


7,231,392 


4,795,000 


2,436,392 


124,828,353 


17 


5.8 


Charles 


5,851,129 


4,077,000 


1,774,129 


88,908,013 


15 


6.6 


Dorchester 


3,738,192 


3,508,000 


230,192 


80,801,774 


22 


4.6 


Frederick 


20,013,426 


16,435,000 


3,578,426 


260,576,202 


13 


7.7 


Garrett 


1,567,305 


675,000 


892,305 


47,423,839 


30 


3.3 


Harford 


16,311,467 


16,116,000 


195,467 


261,547,129 


16 


6.2 


Howard 


7,339,478 


4,775,000 


2,564,478 


188,895,878 


26 


3.9 


Kent 


879,992 


575,000 


304,992 


58,577,157 


66 


1.5 




94,417,825 


61,772,597 


32,645,228 


1,861,844,755 


20 


5.1 


Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's 


100,042,231 


80,279,000 


19,763,231 


1,383,982,890 


14 


7.2 


3,927,987 


3,585,000 


342,987 


58,382,714 


15 


6.7 


St. Mary's 


3,388,718 


1,900,000 


1,488,718 


67,425,388 


20 


5.0 


Somerset 


1,903,043 


1,600,000 


303,043 


34,269,166 


18 


5.5 


Talbot 


3,584,416 


2,485,000 


1,099,416 


80,132,270 


22 


4.5 


Washington 


*18,664,856 


*15,985,000 


*2, 679,856 


302,055,319 


16 


6.2 


Wicomico 


7,261,104 


6,602,000 


659,104 


173,055,436 


24 


4.2 


Worcester 


1,498,694 


745,000 


753,694 


106,286,264 


71 


1.4 



* Includes following bonded indebtedness for community colleges: Baltimore City, $4,121,490; Baltimore, $700,000; 

Washington, $780,000; total, $5,601,490. 
t General School Construction Loan. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



219 



TABLE 117 — Maryland Public Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest Payments 
per Pupil Belonging (K-12) : June 30, 1965 



Local Unit 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Interest 
Payments 



Local Unit 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Interest 
Payments 



Total State 

Allegany ..... 
Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore. . . . 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 

Frederick 



$870.43 

495.83 
910.52 
753.79 
1,202,64 
491.55 

567.85 
115.28 
679.97 
658.29 
578.15 

1.243.13 



$25.91 

16.17 
25.88 
20.54 
37.25 
18.40 

17.97 
3.00 
19.13 
11.13 
16.60 

42.40 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . 
Prince George 
Queen Anne's , 
St. Mary's . . , 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . 
Wicomico. . . 
Worcester. . . 



$312.63 
796.66 
708.53 
253.27 

969.40 
992.02 
951.80 
443.31 
429.95 

816.57 
885.73 
620.45 
248.66 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



220 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 118 — Local Revenue Appropriations for Programs Operated by Local 
Boards of Education: State of Maryland: 1964-65 



T A T T^MTT 


XjOCAL 

Revenue* 


Appropriations for Public ScHOOLsf 


Per Cent of Total Reventje 
Appropriated for Public Schools 


All School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


Debt 
Service 


All 
School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


Debt 
Service 


Total State 


$509,355,932 


$237,015,221 


$192,922,756 


$9,368,318 


$34,724,147 


46 


5 


37. 


9 


1 


8 


6.8 




8,581,288 


3,738,674 


3,096,943 


1,000 


640,731 


43 


6 


36 


1 






7.5 




24,719,196 


12,021,547 


9,820,885 




2,200,662 


48 


6 


39 


7 






8.9 


Baltimore City. . . . 


175,148,156 


54,336,115 


50,108,041 


107,500 


4,120,574 


31 





28 


6 





1 


2.3 




77,981,132 


46,145,972 


36,623,122 


1,206,191 


8,316,659 


59 





46 


9 


1 


5 


10.6 


Calvert 


1,833,823 


855,628 


651,730 


15,000 


188,898 


46 


6 


35 


5 





8 


10.3 


Caroline 


1,948,651 


935,672 


667,539 


30,806 


237,327 


48 





34 


2 


1 


6 


12.2 


Carroll 


5,665,842 


3,209,994 


2,389,355 


561,786 


258,853 


56 


7 


42 


2 


9 


9 


4.6 


Cecil 


5,199,578 


2,618,269 


1,916,097 


88,539 


613,633 


50 


4 


36 


9 


1 


7 


11.8 




3,575,766 


1,435,879 


1,125,166 


53,700 


257,013 


40 


2 


31 


5 


1 


5 


7.2 


Dorchester 


3,164,703 


1,046,342 


1,046,342 






33 


1 


33 


1 








Frederick 


8,601,980 


5,193,166 


3,700,913 


165,526 


1,326,727 


60 


3 


43 





1 


9 


15.4 


Garrett 


2,518,580 


732,722 


529,384 


86,001 


117,337 


29 


1 


21 





3 


4 


4.7 


Harford 


7,937,231 


4,482,953 


3,587,626 




895,327 


56 


5 


45 


2 






11.3 


Howard 


6,161,629 


3,247,933 


2,739,488 


71,556 


436,889 


52 


7 


44 


5 


1 


2 


7.0 


Kent 


2,046,213 


1,017,005 


730,275 


152,681 


134,049 


49 


7 


35 


7 


7 


5 


6.5 




84,235,118 


49,739,270 


39,030,351 


3,867,901 


6,841,018 


59 





46 


3 


4 


6 


8.1 


Prince George's .... 


59,650,002 


31,992,176 


23,874,229 


2,035,052 


6,082,895 


53 


6 


40 





3 


4 


10.2 


Queen Anne's 


2,161,077 


978,111 


827,297 


79,425 


71,389 


45 


3 


38 


3 


3 


7 


3.3 


St. Mary's 


2,927,655 


931,266 


616,714 


125,802 


188,750 


31 


8 


21 


1 


4 


3 


6.4 


Somerset 


1,415,210 


556,441 


436,469 


16,750 


103,222 


39 


3 


30 


8 


1 


2 


7.3 


Talbot 


3,251,149 


1,223,506 


1,000,167 


23,274 


200,065 


37 


6 


30 


8 





7 


6.1 




10,600,432 


6,337,549 


4,992,487 


59,680 


1,285,382 


59 


8 


47 


1 





6 


12.1 


Wicomico 


6,213,564 


2,282,630 


2,168,002 


114,628 




36 


7 


34 


9 


1 


8 




Worcester 


3,817,957 


1,956,401 


1,244,134 


505,520 


206,747 


51 


2 


32 


6 


13 


2 


'5.4 



* Figures from State Fiscal Research Bureau: Include taxes, licenses and permits, and fines and forfeitures. 

t Figures from annual financial reports of local boards of education adjusted to conform to fiscal period of the local unit. 



Maryland State Department of Education 221 



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222 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 120—1964-65 Valuation of Property Assessable at Full Rate for 
County Purposes: State of Maryland 







County Commissioners 






Total 








State 


Local Unit 


Assessable at 








Tax 




Full Rate 






Personal 


Commission* 






Total 


Real Estate 


Property 




Total State 


$11,176,394,419 


$8,837,691,036 


$8,642,620,343 


$195,070,693 


$2,338,703,383 




222,083,576 


155,365,586 


149,016,981 


6,348,605 


66,717,990 


Anne Arundelf . 


634,032,942 


527,428,492 


520,722,687 


6,705,805 


106,604,450 


Baltimore Cityt 


2,832,631,221 


2,065,741,498 


2,031,366,758 


34,374,740 


766,889,723 




2,046,752,675 


1,653,828,235 


1,635,086,055 


18,742,180 


392,924,440 


Calvert 


40,925,457 


35,077,347 


33,668,780 


1,408,567 


5,848,110 


Caroline 


44,059,956 


35,024,376 


31,939,421 


3,084,955 


9,035,580 


Carroll 


176,916,045 


134,636,915 


125,190,916 


9,445,999 


42,279,130 


Cecil 


124,828,353 


96,223,063 


90,234,953 


5,988,110 


28,605,290 


Charles 


88,908,013 


72,665,513 


69,779,458 


2,886,055 


18,242,500 


Dorchestert 


80,801,774 


57,943,664 


54,893,566 


3,050,098 


22,858,110 




260,576,202 


185,680,112 


161,111,987 


24,568,125 


74,896,090 


Garrett 


47,423,839 


31,388,939 


27,999,533 


3,389,406 


16,034,900 


Harford 


261,547,129 


196,209,489 


188,119,020 


8,090,469 


65,337,640 




188,895,878 


153,035,678 


149,651,643 


3,384,035 


35,860,200 


Kent 


58,577,157 


47,720,457 


43,839,337 


3,881,130 


10,856,690 


Montgomery . . . 


1,861,844,755 


1,571,247,535 


1,555,239,875 


16,007,660 


290,597,220 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 


1,383,982,890 


1,178,927,290 


1,167,873,860 


11,053,430 


205,055,600 


58,382,714 


48,531,054 


44,915,463 


3,615,591 


9,851,660 


St. Mary's 


67,425,388 


54,149,798 


51,516,527 


2,633,271 


13,275,590 


Somerset 


34,269,166 


26,857,276 


25,169,879 


1,687,397 


7,411,890 


Talbot 


80,132,270 


66,473,670 


62,238,865 


4,234,805 


13,658,600 


Washington 


302,055,319 


225,142,539 


214,715,939 


10,426,600 


76,912,780 


Wicomico 


173,055,436 


129,859,686 


125,497,675 


4,362,011 


43,195,750 


Worcester 


106,286,264 


88,532,814 


82,831,165 


5,701,649 


17,753,450 



* Data are for the year ended December 31, 1964, adjusted as of October 1, 1965. 
t Fiscal period ends December 31; all others end June 30. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



223 



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224 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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225 




226 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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227 



TABLE 126 — Adult Education: Receipts and Expenditures: State of Maryland: 

1964-65 



Local Unit 


Receipts for Adult Education from 
Sources Other than Local 


Expenditures for Adult 
Education 


Total 


*Federal 


State 


Fees from 
Attendance 


Total 


Salaries 


Expenses 


Total State 


$658,674 


$388,695 


$52,840 


$217,139 


$1,516,442 


$1,338,740 


$177,702 


Allegany 


37,408 


32,685 


2,103 


2,620 


41,081 


30,822 


10,259 


Anne Arundel 


11,514 


1,680 


4,322 


5,512 


19,573 


19,231 


342 




204,522 


105,659 


9,477 


89,386 


889,272 


768,981 


120,291 


Baltimore 


58,377 


24,809 


9,099 


24,469 


158,542 


152,705 


5,837 


Calvert 


315 




315 




315 


315 




Caroline 


4,832 


3,389 


1,011 


432 


2,039 


1,674 


365 


Carroll 


3,701 


868 


2,314 


519 


2,699 


2,469 


230 


Cecil 


31,171 


26,383 


1,000 


3,788 


14,643 


11,291 


3,352 


Charles 


642 


369 


273 




1,391 


1,391 






833 




791 


" 42 


1,697 


1,697 




Frederick 


12,538 


9,240 


1,776 


1,522 


25,477 


24,182 


1,295 


Garrett 


1,454 


359 


1,095 




1,035 


1,035 




Harford 


10,526 


6,391 




4,135 


11,413 


11,413 




Howard 


1,330 


120 


1,210 




2,954 


2,954 




Kent 


624 


51 


573 




506 


501 


' ' 5 


Montgomery 


76,552 


66,497 


4,800 


5,255 


117,279 


114,131 


3,148 




111,425 


25,989 


7,323 


78,113 


153,148 


133,996 


19,152 


Queen Anne's 


4,251 


3,824 


427 




1,889 


1,889 




St. Marv's 


2,204 


840 


1,364 




3,362 


3,362 




Somerset 


1,270 


510 


760 




1,130 


1,130 




Talbot 


739 


340 


399 




651 


651 






120 




120 




18,080 


18,080 






55,019 


52,i90 


1,508 


1,321 


18,470 


16,558 


1,912 


Worcester 


27,307 


26,502 


780 


25 


29,796 


18,282 


11,514 



* Includes the following: Allegany— MDTA, $26,683; Baltimore City— MDTA, $105,449; Cecil— MDTA, $22,962, 
On the Job Training, $1,905; Harford— MDTA, $6,391; Montgomery— MDTA, 518,857, Federal Rehabilitation Ed- 
ucation Crant, $25,840; Prince George's— MDTA, $13,3:jl; Wicomico— MD TA, $51,325; Worcester— MDTA, 
$26,502. 



228 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 




230 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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236 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 134 — Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered: State of Maryland: 1964-65 





Total 




Being 




Bemg 


Surveyed: 


Closed: 


Local Unit 


Number 


Rehabili- 


Followed 


Training 


Prepared 


Under Ad- 


Other 




Cases 


tated 


on Jobs 


Completed 


for Jobs 


visement 


Services 


Total State 


7,406 


2,410 


193 


706 


1,675 


1,553 


869 


Allegany 


182 


59 


2 


23 


50 


24 


24 


Anne Arundel 


537 


173 


3 


32 


82 


172 


75 


Baltimore City 


2,525 


795 


42 


261 


529 


502 


396 


Baltimore 


690 


214 


17 


55 


209 


119 


76 




57 


17 


1 


1 


12 


15 


11 




54 


12 


3 


11 


13 


11 


4 


Carroll 


179 


63 


4 


6 


39 


34 


33 


Cecil 


81 


31 


6 


15 


16 


7 


6 


Charles 


120 


42 


2 


4 


22 


37 


13 


Dorchester 


76 


28 


2 


16 


10 


6 


14 


Frederick 


275 


109 


8 


8 


77 


65 


8 




65 


29 




5 


l\ 


12 


g 




68 


37 


"i 


3 


15 


8 


4 


Howard 


87 


29 


2 


3 


25 


19 


9 


Kent 


37 


16 


4 


4 


9 


1 


3 


Montgomery 


787 


233 


21 


93 


197 


208 


35 


Prince George's .... 


654 


225 


30 


54 


179 


134 


32 




29 


14 






14 


1 






104 


23 


i 


8 


18 


39 


15 




57 


31 


5 


3 


11 


3 


4 


Talbot 


76 


27 


4 


12 


8 


9 


16 




464 


120 


17 


56 


104 


114 


53 


Wicomico 


157 


63 


13 


30 


18 


10 


23 




45 


20 


5 


3 


7 


3 


7 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Characteristic 



Total 



7,406 


2,410 


4,996 


2,152 


510 


1,642 


1,468 


543 


925 


1,385 


471 


914 


747 


240 


507 


642 


234 


408 


495 


200 


295 


325 


116 


209 


119 


54 


65 


39 


23 


16 


34 


19 


15 


80 


27 


53 


335 


97 


238 


911 


332 


579 


2,450 


804 


1,646 


3,013 


976 


2,037 


287 


96 


191 


199 


64 


135 


28 


14 


14 


103 




103 


4,591 


1,316 


3,275 


866 


367 


499 


551 


222 


329 


484 


179 


305 


353 


134 


219 


225 


84 


141 


336 


108 


228 



Characteristic 



Total 



Rehabili- Othert 
tated* 



Total Number 

Age 

Under 21 

21—30 

31—40 

41—45 

46—50 

51—55 

56—60 

61—65 

66—70 

Over 70 

Education 

None 

1—3 

4— 6 

7—9 

10—12 

13—14 

15—16 

College 

Undetermined 

Dependents 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

More than 5 . . . 



Race 

White 

Negro 

Other 

Sex 

Male 

Female 

Marital Status 

Single 

Married 

Other 

Employment History 
(at Survey) 

Employed 

Unemployed. . . . 
Never Worked 

Worked at 
sometime 



Number on Welfare 
(at Survey) 



5,278 
2,123 

5 



4,848 
2,558 



3,434 
2,630 
1,342 



946 
6,460 
1,593 



4,867 



1,031 



1,747 
659 
4 



1.526 



939 
1,015 

456 



531 
1,879 
326 



1,553 



273 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (2,410). 
t Other clients who received service during the year (4,996). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



237 



TABLE 135 — Cost of Vocational Kehahilitation Case Services Rendered: 
State of Maryland : 1964-65 



Type of Service 



Total 

Diagnosis 

Medical 

Psychiatric 

Psychological 

Occupational 

Surgery and Treatment 

Medical 

Psychiatric 

Surgical 

Dental 

Physical and occupational therapy 

Prosthetic Appliances 

Artificial appliances 

Braces 

Hearing Aids 

Glasses and artificial eyes 

Surgical appliances 

Wheelchairs, hand and power operated . 

Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 

Hospitalization 

Convalescent home care 

Nursing care 

Training and Training Materials 

Personal adjustment training 

Educational institutions 

Rehabilitation Center 

Sheltered Workshops 

EmplojTnent 

Correspondence 

Tutorial 

Training materials 

Maintenance and Transportation 

Maintenance 

Training 

Medical or physical restoration 

Placement 

Medical care 

Transportation 

Training 

Medical or physical restoration 

Placement 

Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) 



Number of 
Clients* 



9,255 

3,764 
2,983 
102 
397 
282 

762 
167 

47 
216 
240 

92 

794 
249 
105 

84 
210 
119 

27 

302 
298 
1 



1,850 
150 
816 
85 
111 
18 
30 
115 
525 

1,582 

636 
13 
86 
27 

572 
128 
120 

201 



Average 
Cost 



$120.81 

32.08 
19.89 
47.65 
52.24 
127.03 

142.95 
39.27 
214.75 
148.59 
204.18 
121.44 

158.42 

339.85 
58.16 

198.44 
26.22 
84.40 

105.02 

379.72 
380.64 
850.00 
132.00 

219.20 
151.81 
332.05 
534.22 
246.81 
162.09 
106.89 
92.61 
42.31 

140.90 

266.29 
53.97 
45.87 
85.70 

72.86 
30.86 
8.01 

97.00 



* Duplication of clients may occur when more than one service is received. 



238 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 136— Nature of Disability of Rehabilitation Clients: 
State of Maryland: 1964-65 



Type of Disability 


Total 


xvenaDiiiiaLea^ 




Total 


7,406 


2,410 


4,996 


Orthopedic Amputation 


469 


240 


229 




83 


36 


47 




11 


2 


9 


Leg or foot 


338 


188 


150 




29 


9 


20 


Multiple 


8 


5 


3 


Orthopedic Impairment 


1,904 


666 


1,238 




149 


49 


100 


Arms or hands 


51 


14 


37 


Leg or foot 


393 


123 


270 




292 


98 


194 


Multiple 


303 


96 


207 


Back, spine, dwarf 


435 


139 


296 




281 


147 


134 


Vision 


527 


173 


354 




233 


68 


165 


Blind, one eye 


127 


48 


79 


Defective vision 


167 


57 


110 




398 


149 


249 


Totally deaf 


139 


34 


105 




259 


115 


144 




641 


140 


501 




3,467 


1,042 


2,425 




105 


24 


81 


Cardiac 


465 


142 


323 




238 


70 


168 




1,207 


369 


838 
445 




621 


176 


Other 


831 


261 


570 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (2,410). 
t Other clients who received service during the year (4,996). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



239 



TABLE 137 — Number of Vocational Rehabilitation Referrals by Reporting 
Agencies: State of Maryland : 1964-65 



Types op Referrals 


Total 


Rehabilitated* 


Othert 


Total 


7,406 


2,410 


4,996 


Educational 


1,171 


269 


902 


Business and Other Colleges 


48 


9 


39 


Private Schools 


37 


8 


29 


Public Schools 


893 


208 


685 




193 


44 


149 




3,179 


1,077 


2,102 


Crippled Children 


36 


16 


20 


Mental Hospitals 


684 


224 


460 




471 


105 


366 




69 


15 


54 




696 


263 


433 




607 


256 


351 




616 


198 


418 




503 


152 


351 




2 


1 


1 


State Rehabilitation 


57 


17 


40 




228 


75 


153 


Public Officials 


40 


11 


29 




11 


4 


7 




165 


44 


121 


Insurance 


380 


105 


275 


Casualty Companies 


8 


4 


4 


Bureau of Old-Age and Survivors Insurance 

State Workmen's Compensation Commission 


223 


43 


180 


139 


54 


85 


10 


4 


6 




678 


192 


486 




576 


156 


420 




65 


25 


40 


Community Advisory Centers 


37 


11 


26 




1,495 


615 


880 




91 


56 


35 




41 


21 


20 




4 


3 


1 




553 


187 


366 


Self-referred 


753 


334 


419 


Other 


53 


14 


39 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (2,410). 
t Other clients who received service during the year (4,996). 



240 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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241 



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242 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 139— FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 

Rehabilitation: 1964-65 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Vocational 
Rehabilitation 


RECEIPTS 







Balance Forwarded from 1963-64 

General Fund Appropriation 

Special Fund Appropriation 

Federal Fund Appropriation 

Appropriation Cancellations 

Budget Credits 

Nonbudgeted Receipts 

Net Transfers 

Total Funds Available 



$50,736 
1,196,352 



410,776 
68,656 
4,106 
86,832 
74,818 



$1,754,964 



$44,391 
803,984 

1,577',444 
63,142 
11,818 



11,807 



$2,386,302 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 



Departmental and 
Financial 
Administration 

$358,889 
27,861 

8,927 
13,807 

3,515 
58,444 

8,983 

9,676 

4,420 

1,222 

4,795 



$500,539 

Supervisory and 
Consultative 
Services 

$459,692 
27,005 
17,754 
33,748 

5,277 
78,136 
12,045 

6,194 
11,877 
72,035 



$723,763 



Administration 



$91,579 
4,070 
2,252 
3,219 
943 
21,371 
3,125 
200 
367 
4,653 
1,535 



$133,314 

Placement 

and 
Guidance 

$543,277 
8,247 
20,809 
27,737 
2,079 
53,389 
8,931 
1,883 
9,715 
29,597 
27,653 



$733,317 



Maryland State Department of Education 



243 



TABLE 139— Continued— FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 

Rehabilitation: 1964-65 







Vocational 


Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Rehabilitation 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Total Program Expenditures 

Other Expenditures 

Total Disbursements 

Unexpended Balance Returned to 
Treasury 

Balance, June 30, 1965 



Administrative 
Services 

$175,547 
30,773 
6,519 
5,725 
1,214 
9,223 
2,845 
4,979 
653 



$237,478 

Library 
Extension 
Services 



$99,719 



$99,719 



$1,561,499 
79,691 



$1,641,190 

49,398 
$64,376 



Case 
Services 



$1,120,168 



$1,120,168 

Disability 
Determinations 
(O.A.S.I.) 

$119,918 
158,986 
3,034 
4,024 
245 
1,752 
1,282 
2,649 
9,209 
8.039 



$309,138 



$2,295,93^ 



$2,295,937 

22,350 
$68,015 



244 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 249 



CO 


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1,734.6 


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814.7 
426.9 
153.6 


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236.0 
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225.8 


229.8 
552.8 
458.8 
403.0 
275.5 


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586.6 
490.1 
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281.1 


824.5 
202.0 
955.6 
531.0 
185.9 


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250 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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51.8 


6.0 
33.3 
7.5 


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: : : : 


10 • • • 

:o : : 


»o . . . 
oi'-' '. '. '. 


: : : 




Guidance 
Counselors 


55.6 


26.0 
29.0 
0.6 












Librarians 


253.2 


20.0 
38.0 
80.5 
0.7 


CO o> ■ ifi • 

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13.0 

7.6 
0.6 
1.2 


69.0 
8.0 




^ional Staff 


i 

Teachers 


15,457.0 


296.0 
1,256.0 
3,837.0 
2,193.1 

110.1 


82.2 
247.0 
225.4 
189.0 
127.0 


338.0 
92.0 
438.2 
225.4 
77.6 


2,174.9 
2,314.0 
83.5 
168.4 
85.1 


98.0 
432.9 
247.2 
119.0 


Profess 


Principals 
and 
Vice- 
Principals 


928.9 


CO 

CO 05 ^ 0* 
^ »o — >o — 

CI — ' 


8.2 
11.6 
16.0 
13.5 

4.0 


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Assistant 

Super- 
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Directors 
or 

Supervisors 


258.2 


5.0 
16.4 
96.6 
20.1 

2.5 


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272 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE XVIII — Disbursements for All Purposes: Maryland Locj 



Local Unit 


Total 
Disburse- 
ments* 


Interest 
for Debt 
Service* 


Capital 
Outlay* 


Outgoing Transfers 




To Other 
School 
Units 


Tuition — 
Handicapped 
Children 


School 
Lunch and 
Special Milk 


Total 
Current 


Instructio 


Total State 


$459,400,811 


$18,554,419 


$97,727,144 


$31,746 


$770,371 


$3,455,784 


$338,861,347 


$247,930,7 


Allegany 


10,340,107 


270,424 


2,783,901 


44 




120,806 


7 164 932 


5 127 9 


Anne Arundel .... 


31,691,744 


1,393,474 


7,593,410 


56 


12,86i 


307^429 


22]384!514 


16,666*4 


Baltimore City . . . 




u,DDD, 101 


11 Kfil KC1 
1-1,001,001 




226',610 


418^371 


76'368'508 


57'83l'3 


Baltimore 


69,773,405 


3,939,323 


12,629,576 


100 


55!336 


629)706 


52l519',364 


38,'284[2 


Calvert 


2,526,830 


92,011 


59,794 


16 


600 


21,264 


2,353,145 


1,596,7 


Caroline 


2,444,048 


86,573 


39,897 


160 


600 


23,626 


2,293,192 


1,584,6 


Carroll 


6,196,952 


37,141 


753,538 


616 




68,194 


5,337,463 


3,926,0 


Cecil 


6,273,867 


203,450 


1,132,255 


84 




46,140 


4,891,938 


3,537,0 


Charles 


6,266,686 


98,955 


1,751,923 




2,365 


44,351 


4,369,092 


2,683,4 


Dorchester 


3,038,527 


107,364 


3,000 


2,040 


300 


26,450 


2,899,373 


1,912,2 


Frederick 


14,441,918 


682,562 


5,518,786 


1.432 


2,011 


95,125 


8,142,002 


6,032,31 




2,429,121 


31,963 


215,535 


11,621 


600 


30,456 


2,138,946 


1,392,1 


Harford 


14,321,543 


542,040 


4,010,612 


325 


3,840 


116,521 


0,648,205 


6,691,8 


Howard 


6,997,575 


160,177 


1,974,439 


3,916 




71,103 


4,787,940 


3,579,5 


Kent 


1,932,767 


26,879 


170,286 


5 


2,000 


18,725 


1,714,872 


1,255,8 


Montgomery 


74,781,565 


3,100,162 


12,976,383 


257 


275,856 


521,870 


57,907,037 


41,612,2 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


75,162,751 


2,977,378 


24,563,811 


912 


173,717 


603,240 


46,843,693 


34,992,5 


2,221,062 


32,779 


224,637 


3,454 




23,963 


1.936,229 


1,351,5 


St. Mary's 


5,649,385 


107,246 


2,154,171 




3,475 


42,904 


3,341,589 


2,260,0 


Somerset 


1,995,842 


61,531 


8,122 


1,416 




10,357 


1,914,416 


1,354,5 


Talbot 


3,185,130 


79,178 


1,130,735 


260 


3,000 


18,590 


1,953,367 


1,375,6 


Washington 


12,851,051 


594,003 


1,800,704 






1 15,289 


10,341,055 


7,448,8 




6,398,866 


222,100 


1,128,654 


4,900 


6,000 


55,295 


4,981,917 


3,615,1 


Worcester 


3,238,878 


41,555 


541,424 


132 


1,200 


26,009 


2,628,558 


1,818,1 



* Includes disbursements for community colleges. See TABLES XXVI and XXVII for these amounts, 
t Includes Teachers' Retirement and Social Security paid direct by State. 

t Excludes Federal reimbursement for school lunch and special milk shown as an outgoing transfer in column 6. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



273 



Boards of Education: 1964-65 



Current Expenses 



Pupil 
Personnel 
Services 


neaiin 
Services 


Operation 

nf Plont 

and Equip- 
ment 


Mainte- 
nance of 
Plant 


Pupil 
Trans- 
portation 


Adminis- 
tration 


Fixed 
Chargest 


Food 
Services! 


OLUU6I1L 

Body 
Activities 


Com- 
munity 
Services 


v^om- 
munity 
Colleges 


2,674,448 


$674,488 


$28,624,336 


$11,779,232 


$13,392,565 


$5,794,942 


$21,546,180 


$630,000 


$478,943 


$351,086 


$4,984,407 


52,386 
158,828 
654,138 
346,689 

21,442 


13,743 

93',5i6 
222,894 
238 


572,651 
1,574,722 
7,211,498 
4,940,692 

139,121 


143,827 
582,244 
2,418,613 
2,252,264 
74,843 


440,179 
1,274,021 

490,972 
1,753,796 

334,851 


73,036 
360,104 
1,280,447 
635,059 

49,094 


467,129 
1,484,072 
5,086,471 
3,070,967 

133,141 


34,579 

48,887 
118,831 
3,685 


2,605 
11,952 
239,586 
35,430 


4,543 
14,267 


237,877 
267,614 
1,013,029 
844,210 


13,154 
28,914 
32,697 
36,963 
23,013 


119 

5,599 
1,037 
799 


162,766 
294,923 
398,555 
326,450 
224,524 


67,097 
188,145 
142,759 
219,666 
187,856 


277,233 
458,303 
372,456 
497,419 
331,669 


35,571 
71,231 
98,447 
80,312 
44,975 


142,961 
308,093 
286,653 
221,900 
170,773 


2,514 
14,721 

2,574 
89,167 

3,546 


7,081 
33,722 

12,633 


13,345 
15,100 
100,089 


100,666 


' 45,298 
10,550 
43,770 

j 33,743 
12,734 


19,925 
600 

19,683 
2,653 
986 


532,334 
110,889 
647,619 
255,161 
95,991 


229,020 
75,705 
339,186 
105,209 
41,752 


454,449 
381,675 
853,925 
446,878 
163,206 


110,927 
41,131 

181,618 
66,388 
34,576 


497,946 
118,414 
536,661 
263,985 
104,839 


88,932 
6,373 

3,893 


1,287 
34,340 


26,938 
149 

1,073 


103,835 
333,892 


718,251 
270,967 
10,356 
42,458 
10,398 


8,965 
228,358 
279 
2,458 


4,846,949 
4,317,202 
109,464 
245,997 
112,285 


1,853,679 
1,937,715 

67,210 
176,701 

66,754 


1,396,173 
1,143,907 
241,764 
343,555 
227,634 


1,712,294 
464,656 
40,989 
74,186 
28,178 


4,148,038 
2,871,321 
107,207 
182,061 
111,965 


21,701 
144,230 

13,648 
888 


92,297 

358 
1,800 


149,308 
9,934 
7,440 
126 


1,439,444 
370,547 


10,707 
59,209 
, 26,590 
11,193 


39,454 
13,182 


136,919 
839,365 
368,102 
160,157 


68,651 
311,188 
130,472 

99,676 


186,992 
541,671 
457,027 
322,810 


44,203 
162,348 
57,473 
47,699 


118,199 
652,799 
294,872 
165,713 


1,584 
12,250 
14,869 

3,128 


1,900 
3,952 


8,543 
23i 


273,953 



274 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



s 

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Services 


O O • 

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1,338,742 

30,822 
19,231 
768,981 
152,705 
315 

1,675 
2,469 
11,291 
1,392 
1,698 

24,181 
1,035 

11,413 
2,954 
501 

114,131 
133,996 
1,889 
3,362 
1,130 

651 
18,080 
16,558 
18,282 


Total 
Adult 
Education 


1,516,442 

41,080 
19 573 
889',272 
158,541 
315 

2,040 
2,699 
14,643 
1,392 
1,698 

25,477 
1,035 

1!,413 
2,954 
506 

117,279 
153,147 
1,889 
3,362 
1,130 

651 
18,080 
18,470 
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280 



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64-65 




to 


Other 


$11,180 














5,413 






O 03 
CD ^ 






1,073 


3,375 


§ 






►Is: 19< 




;her Charge 


Non- 
public 
School 
Transpor- 
tation 


$198,854 






4,543 
14.267 








7,932 
14,240 
100,089 














43,181 
6,559 


8,043 




; Schoo 


:VICES 


O 


Total 
Other 
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$210,034 






4,543 
14.267 








13,345 
14,240 
100.089 




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1.073 




43,181 
9,934 


8.543 






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Supplies 

and 
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$2,315 




















2,189 










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Services: Maryland 


COMW 


Con- 
tracted 
Services 


$26,401 


















18,730 










7,440 




■ CO • 
• (M • 




Salaries 
and 

Wages 


$112,336 


















5,349 










106,127 










Total 
Com- 
munity 
Services 


CO 

00 

o 

CO 

«^ 






4,543 
14.267 








13,345 
15,100 
100.089 




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1.073 


149,308 
9,934 
7,440 
126 


8,543 
'23i 


I Community 




Other 
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d 

00 

o 


564 
11,905 
12,754 


















10,634 




16,089 
1,800 






Body Activities 


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and 
Materials 


$185,643 




78,507 








33,322 


9,911 




oc 
oc 




23,706 




39,310 








es, and 


Con- 
tracted 
Services 


oc 
a> 






38,642 
35,104 








2,722 














17,127 
358 


1,900 
3,952 


Body Activiti 


Student 


and 
Wages 


$132,668 


2,041 
47 

109,683 
326 






o 
o 








c 
o 










19',771 










Total 
Student 

Body. 
Activities 


$478,943 


2,605 
11,952 
239,586 
35.430 






7,081 
33,722 


12,633 




1,287 


34,340 




92,297 

358 
1,800 

1,900 

3,952 


tudent 




Equip- 
ment 

Replace- 
ment 


$107,067 






■ CT> 
. . 05_ 

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CO 






2,600 


2',669 


2,598 
4,144 




CD 


20,261 
3,549 


825 
1,484 


od Services, S 




OtVipr 
uiner 

Charges 


$44,186 


c 
t ^ 


2,185 






CO 

o 

CD 


6,189 
3,546 


15,826 
1.040 






CC 




1,045 
2,483 

1,118 

888 


676 
60 
3,010 

1,00/ 


ervices 


Supplies 

and 
Materials 


$157,743 


25,000 

48,887 
148 






8,771 
224 
633 


5,930 
94 








52 
66,471 

'785 


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for Fo 


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05 

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oo 
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2,747 


• • 

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■ <M • 


2,338 










945 
2,279 








jments 




oaiaries 
and 

Wages 


$312,045 


a- 
cc 
oc 
oc 


47,507 
3,327 


c: 


2,350 
79,984 


62,240 
195 




2,571 


20,604 
54,070 

5',9i7 




12,000 
9.900 
1.471 




>isburs€ 




Tntal 

1 oiai 
Food 
Services 


$630,000 


34,579 

48.887 
118,831 
3,685 


2,514 
14,721 

2,574 
89,167 

3,546 


88,932 
6,373 




3,893 


21,701 
144,230 

13,648 
888 


1,584 
12,250 
14,869 

3 128 


TABLE XXIV— E 


Local Unit 


c 

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Q. 
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Baltimore City 

Carver 

City College 

Dunbar 

Eastern 

Edmondson 

Forest Park 

Frederick Douglass. . . 

Mergenthaler 

Patterson 

Polytechnic 

Southern 

Western 

Junior High Schools. . 
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Dulaney Sr 

Dundalk Sr 

Franklin Sr 

Milford Mill Sr 

Overlea Sr 

ParkviUe Sr. 

Patapsco Sr 

Perry Hall Sr 

PikesviUe Sr 

Towson Sr 

Woodlawn Sr 

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Hereford Sr.-Jr 

Sollers Point Sr.-.Jr.... 
Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr. 
Arbutus Jr 

Dumbarton Jr 

Dundalk Jr 

Franklin Jr 

(Jolden Ring Jr 

Holabird Jr 

Johnnycake Jr 

Loch Raven Jr 

Middle River Jr 

North Point Jr 

ParkviUe Jr 

Ridgely Jr 

Stcmmers Run Jr 

Sudbrook Jr 

Towson town Jr 

Woodlawn Jr 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



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Num- 
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Staff 






Local Unit 
Name of High School 


Howard 

Harriet 'i'nlirii:inSr.-Jr. 

Clarksville Jr 

Ellicott (^ity Sr 

Rockland Jr 

Waterloo Jr 


Kent 

Chcstertown Sr.-Jr 

Galena Sr.-Jr 

Garnett Sr.-Jr 

Rock Hall Sr.-Jr 

Montgomery 

Albert Einstein Sr. . . . 
Bethesda Chevy 

Chase Sr 

Gaithcrsburg Sr 

Montgomery Blair Sr. 

North wood Sr 

Richard Montg. Sr... . 

Springbrook Sr 

Walt Whitman Sr. . . . 
Walter Johnson Sr.... 

Wheaton Sr 

Damascus Sr.-Jr 

J. F. Kennedy Sr.-Jr.. 
Poolesviile Sr.-Jr 

Potomac Sr.-Jr 

R. E. Peary Sr.-Jr. . . . 
Rock Terrace Sr.-Jr... 
Sherwood Sr.-Jr 



Maryland State Department of Education 

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290 



I 



II 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 

:::::::::: : : : : : 



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11 



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Maryland State Department of Education 





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Easton Sr.-Jr 

St. Michaels Sr.- jr.... 

Washington 

Boonsboro Sr 

Hancock Sr 

No. Hagerstown Sr. . . 

So. Hagerstown Sr 

Clear Spring Sr.-Jr — 
Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 
Williamsport Sr.-Jr.... 

Boonsboro Jr 

Hancock Int. Jr 

No. Potomac Jr 

So. Potomac Jr 

Washington Jr 

Wicomico 

J. M. Bennett Sr.-Jr... 

Mardela Sr.-Jr 

Pittsville Sr.-Jr 

Salisbury Sr.-Jr 

Worcester 

Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 

Worcester Sr.-Jr 



292 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIX — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates: 



T T' - 


Total 




Social 




Mat he 


1 




1 

1 

1 




Enroll- 


Eiiglisti 


Studies 


fecience 


mattes 


Latin 


1 French, 






ment 












Total State 


307,777 


344,471 


1 

, 310,191 


249,641 


236 ,575 


9,300 


59 ,278 


21,620 


Allegany 


8 752 


11 973 


9 451 


6 963 


6 404 


506 


1 437 


429 


AUGgs^ny Sr -Jr 


2*304 


3*065 


2*593 


1 '726 


1 '694 


282 


*198 


309 


Beall Sr - Jr 


1 031 


1 214 


1 '097 


*701 


'702 




360 




BrucG Sr -Jr 


'827 


1 *106 


'846 


668 


526 


18 


209 




Flintstoii8 Sr -Jr 


238 


1 *290 


269 


203 


192 




25 




Fort Hill Sr -Jr 


2 134 


2 981 


2 440 


1 746 


1 528 


! 206 


285 


120 


A^t Sav2.gc Sr - Jr 


'579 


*802 


'goo 


'487 


'429 


.... 


141 




Oldtown Sr -Jr 


225 


315 


232 


207 


171 








Vallev Sr -Jr 


821 


1 118 


777 


601 


545 




219 




C"r6ssptown Jr 


227 


*348 


227 


227 


227 








Beall Elementary (7th) 


168 


336 


171 


198 


195 








PeiiDsylvaDia Ave (7tli) 


198 


398 


199 


199 


197 








Awe \Rr\DEL 


22 924 


25 ,588 


20 ,085 


15,246 


13 ,686 


372 


3,296 


753 


A.nnapolis Sr 


2*052 


2*260 


2*483 


1 '631 


1 ^427 


78 


477 


241 


A.runciel Sr 


910 


1*015 


1 'l92 


'588 


*426 




152 


146 




2,169 


2*300 


2^521 


1,301 


1,068 


'ill 


473 






701 


703 


432 


432 


191 




118 




Aiidover Sr -Jr 


2 001 


3,401 


1,833 


1 ,222 


1 ,147 


86 


317 




Bates Sr - Jr 


1475 


1 *580 


1 '599 


1 *122 


1 ,174 




92 


9i 


Brooklvii Park Sr -Jr 


1 '752 


1)790 


1 1696 


1 il63 


*957 


44 


219 




Severiia Park Sr -Jr 


1 '904 


2*203 
926 


2*032 


1 616 


1 332 


53 


452 


275 




887 


729 


574 


490 




171 




Amiapclis Jr 


1 879 


1 963 


1 035 


1 083 


1,116 


. .. . 


98 






1 '756 


1 742 


1 *732 


1 739 


1 ,548 




325 




Bat^s Jr \iiiiex 


395 


328 














Corkraii Jr 


1,746 


1,821 


r,ii2 


r,ii2 


r,ii2 




igi 




George Fox Jr 


1 348 


1 530 


854 


854 


889 ' 




101 




I^lac A-rthur Jr 


708 


*740 
















968 


987 


615 


615 


615 




iio 




^py^j-iijj Park Annex 


273 


299 


220 


194 


194 










68,088 


69,843 


73,099 


56,727 


56,163 


1,774 


14,424 


4,503 




1,389 


1,665 


1,276 


1,107 


1,228 










3 588 


3 898 


3 142 


2 794 


2 923 


2i2 


935 


iis 




1 876 


2*506 


1 '588 


1 *410 


1 *288 




263 


191 




3 208 


3 401 


3 299 


2*101 


1 778 


205 


727 


345 




2 991 


3 267 


2 318 


1 588 


1 *453 
983 


28 


328 


266 






2 282 


2 078 


1 526 


31 


331 


436 


T^^rpHpripk' T^niifrliicc 


2 355 


2 840 


2 003 


1 994 


1 274 


22 


631 


492 




1 906 


2 224 


1 732 


1 604 


1 *717 








PiittGrson 


2 321 


2 *615 


2 255 


1 '565 


1 '396 


29 


i54 


94 




2 417 


2 469 


2 081 


1 854 


3 '582 




1,058 






1 839 


2 436 


2 060 


1 192 


1 219 


is 


*178 


64 




1 879 


1 956 


1 *015 


1 '541 


1 '222 


348 


907 


268 




38*773 


37 058 


47 047 


35 344 


34 *902 


881 


8,912 


1,929 




1 457 


1 226 


1 205 


1 ,007 


1 ,198 


.... 






Baltimore 


49 269 


54 101 


00 jOoyf 


40 145 


38 834 


1 065 


8 874 


6,653 


Ccitoi)svili6 Sr 


1 752 


1 '755 


2 052 


1 'l65 


1 *096 


63 


*352 


380 


Duliiiiov Sr 


1 508 


1 722 


1 633 


1 014 


1 *181 


113 


494 


446 


DiinHalk- Sr 


2 058 


2 206 


2 '239 


1 328 


1 143 


91 


371 


237 




1 334 


1 509 


1 389 


'915 


907 


49 


325 


197 






2 721 


2 943 


1 246 


1 354 


98 


344 


331 




1 073 


1 203 


1 *246 


'679 


477 




119 


171 


\filfnrrl Mill Sr 


1 850 


2 098 


2 202 


1 203 


1 370 


60 


543 


398 




1 ,DUO 


1 819 


1^863 


'9I8 


702 


42 


156 


263 


X ark\ lUc or 




2 072 


2 200 


1 166 


987 


58 


337 


347 




1 345 


1 476 


1 497 


'887 


570 


58 


246 


146 


Pom- HoU 


1 ,1-10 


1 266 


1 316 


697 


662 


32 


270 


199 


Pikesville Sr 


670 


'828 


'662 


518 


611 


27 


290 


276 




1,749 


2,030 


2,052 


1,134 


1,306 


103 


574 


400 




1,638 


1,827 


1,902 


1,028 


1,005 


82 


368 


333 




1,099 


1,106 , 


1,037 


1,065 


978 




125 


128 




1,269 


1,478 


1 ,299 


1,046 


964 




264 


76 




719 


980 


679 


639 


516 




87 






1,940 


2,161 


2,388 


1,576 


1,395 


"26 


330 


"62 


Arbutus Jr 


1,540 


1,675 


1,529 


1,529 


1,529 




101 


173 




1,296 


1,418 ! 


1,281 


1,273 


1,277 




318 


164 




1,093 


1,187 1 


1,101 


1,086 


1,085 


"I8 


266 


103 




1,095 


1,174 


1,077 

908 


1,090 
908 


1,083 




173 


56 




932 


958 1 


908 




82 


57 




1,331 


1,389 , 


1,312 


1,313 


1,319 




185 


156 




1,334 


1,341 


2,166 


1,312 


1,292 




101 


64 




1,065 


1 ,424 ' 


1,111 • 


1,160 


1,037 




133 


72 



Maryland State Department of Education 293 



I ach Maryland Public High School: Fall of 1964 



Other 
I'oreign 

Lan- 
i^uages 


Agri- 
culture 


Industrial 


Education 


Home 
Eco- 
nomics 


Business 
Education 


Physical 
and 
Health 
Education 


Music 


Art- 
Arts 
and 

Crafts 


Driver 
Education 


Special 
Education 


Arts 


Vocational 

and 
Technical 


3,648 


4,371 


101 ,206 


18,206 


79,598 


128,717 


270,385 


166,448 


105,558 


11,565 


33,140 




45 


1,835 


273 


1,868 


3,613 
985 


5,022 


5,805 


3,009 


505 


33 






400 


79 


329 


1,270 


1,148 


440 


94 








253 


55 


238 


570 


443 


530 


297 


90 








227 


37 


213 


430 


452 


789 


313 


82 






45 


51 




80 


37 


205 


227 












341 


102 


479 


710 


892 


1,247 


734 


iei 


33 






151 




144 


282 


407 


532 


255 


20 








88 




78 


95 


204 


135 


79 










216 




188 


504 


507 


490 


364 


58 








108 




119 




227 


251 


160 


















201 


168 


168 


















214 


288 


199 






168 


63 


5,806 


170 


5,498 


9,438 


18 ,056 


10,876 


10,127 




944 






544 




320 


930 


1,049 


838 


281 














73 


924 


674 


157 


68 










394 


m 


312 


2,497 


743 


460 


368 










101 




111 


244 


716 


444 


342 






*115 




412 




447 


1 ,197 


1 ,373 


728 


570 




i46 






455 


40 


444 


423 


1,376 


980 


297 




419 


*53 




537 




527 


1 ,377 


1,233 


679 


666 










655 




490 


1 ,151 


834 


384 


618 




104 






180 




178 


519 


795 


407 


163 










541 




780 




1 ,893 


1 ,056 


1,803 




39 






783 




525 


176 


1 ,894 


621 


712 




18 














395 


338 


315 




124 






566 




555 




1,750 


1,377 


1,513 










477 




422 




1,170 


1,150 


1,077 




56 














708 


438 


422 




17 






161 




314 




997 


551 


637 




27 














456 


268 


275 






1,823 




31 ,486 


13,108 


19,966 


35,016 


68 ,479 


44,625 


21,179 




26,987 








t2,990 


436 


1,470 


1,712 


1,412 




1 


*243 




2,064 


782 




1,636 


1,801 


468 


"37 










619 




440 


2,937 


2,025 


2,065 


590 






*111 








959 


3,440 


1,858 


1,924 


437 






*28 




1,284 


56 


289 


4,379 


748 


480 


383 




2 


*80 




605 


33 


410 


1 ,946 


3,884 


793 


92 




5 


27 




847 


208 


702 


1 ,942 


2,665 


2,725 


675 










41 


t4 ,297 


291 


1 ,783 


2,222 


1,514 








*53 




1,126 


64 


644 


4,109 


2,471 


2,884 


529 




3 


*263 




4,304 


398 






1,816 


120 












1,250 




372 


2,372 


2,041 


1,227 


1,019 




2 


*162 








440 


1,141 


1,921 


772 


329 






*856 




18,890 


2,i09 


14 ,578 


7,610 


41,481 


26,436 


16,616 




25,431 






456 


2,171 


405 


251 


1,834 


1,805 


472 




1,543 


416 


113 


15 ,985 


838 


12 ,970 
408 


17,601 


49,524 


30,528 


25,407 
168 


1,354 


1,006 






532 


57 


1,396 


1,745 


407 


112 


20 


t35 




323 


24 


294 


601 


1,482 


358 


159 


126 


65 






784 


229 


388 


1,742 


2,003 


252 


228 


121 


19 






521 


44 


389 


565 


1,331 


674 


432 


40 


12 






744 


169 


385 


2,251 


2,496 


392 


147 


98 


190 


1- • ■ 




419 


49 


291 


1,156 


1 ,077 


216 


101 


60 


19 


*101 




294 




293 


1,058 


1,789 


367 


167 


104 








596 


39 


356 


1,379 


1,571 


315 


199 


50 


iio 


t25 




528 


28 


300 


1 ,390 


1,883 


427 


197 


60 


40 






438 


47 


262 


1,210 


1,351 


166 


161 


128 


14 






399 




248 


760 


1,141 


177 


156 


59 








83 




65 


280 


666 


117 


45 


31 




"Hi 




249 


"65 


335 


793 


1,768 


314 


209 


56 




♦84 




638 


46 


299 


1,359 


1,603 


457 


151 


100 


"16 






378 




345 


172 


1,100 


788 


830 




29 




'ii3 


384 




283 


540 


1,261 


936 


693 


" 54 


19 


.... 




283 




218 


227 


718 


589 


464 


31 


39 






679 




505 


722 


1,952 


1,360 


1,153 


124 


45 






545 




516 




1,539 


1,566 


1,525 




19 






490 




438 




1,281 


1,055 


997 




24 






363 




347 




1,103 


1,187 


959 




14 






416 




341 




1,088 


1,014 


1,034 
952 




12 






260 




212 




1,281 


1,103 




29 






497 




405 




1,345 


1,283 


1,213 




70 






464 




421 




1,326 


1,376 


1 ,203 




35 


■*35 




367 




368 




1,061 


1,126 


882 




34 



294 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIX — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicatesr 



Local Unit 
Name of High School 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 


French 


—11 

1 

Spanish 1 
i 


Loch Raven Jr 


1,183 


1,399 


1,164 


1,164 


1,165 




140 


137 




1,217 


1,365 


1,189 


1,189 


1,044 




97 


57 




1,368 


1,411 


1,337 


1,338 


1,338 




162 


93 


Parkville Jr 


1,590 


1,704 


1,620 


1,610 


1,543 


66 


186 


182 




1,422 


1,486 


1,398 


1 ,414 


1,416 


64 


278 


163 




1,361 


1,403 


1,343 


1,316 


1,370 




166 


170 




1 ,681 


1,693 


1 ,693 


1,683 


1,683 




374 


314 




1 ,067 


1,114 


1,062 


1,067 


1,069 


15 


306 


139 




1,459 


1,703 


1,460 


1,469 


1,452 




211 


163 


Calvert 


2,052 


2,653 


2,054 


1,827 


1,606 


57 


488 






673 


727 


647 


532 


408 


57 


193 






798 


1,128 


826 


706 


618 




116 






406 


405 


405 


414 


406 




179 






175 


393 


176 


175 


174 








Caroline 


2,155 


3,195 


2,380 


1,794 


1,390 


119 


207 


74 




381 


446 


400 


278 


152 


41 




74 




645 


861 


779 


469 


305 


78 


76 






524 


765 


597 


441 


327 




131 






156 


223 


156 


156 


156 










151 


304 


151 


152 


152 








Greensboro Jr 


146 


292 


146 


146 


146 








Preston Jr 


91 


182 


90 


91 


91 










61 


122 


61 


61 


61 








Carroll 


5,573 


7,062 


5,764 


4,746 


4,086 


24 


845 


63 




433 


466 


418 


373 


218 




65 






492 


768 


514 


384 


332 




103 


"63 


Westminster Sr 


960 


998 


1,027 


700 


418 


24 


277 


North Carroll Sr.-Jr 


867 


954 


914 


669 


620 




115 




Robert Moton Sr.-Jr 


119 


119 


119 


108 


96 




13 






721 


1,033 


824 


638 


568 




110 




Taneytown Sr.-Jr 


457 


614 


461 


397 


347 




91 




Elmer A. Wolfe Jr 


102 


102 


112 


102 


102 








Mount Airy Jr 


102 


232 


102 


102 


102 










132 


157 


132 


132 


142 










1,188 


1,619 


1,141 


1,141 


1 ,141 




71 




Cecil 


4,457 


4,454 


4,117 


3,762 


3,362 


13 


256 


190 


Elkton Sr 


668 


674 


573 


442 


286 


13 


136 






605 


588 


543 


514 


439 




66 


' ' 78 
40 


North East Sr.-Jr 


789 


813 


703 


672 


613 






Perryville Sr.-Jr 


664 


659 


657 


570 


542 




54 


' 119 




874 


858 


813 


735 


653 






Elkton Jr 


857 


862 


828 


829 


829 










3,804 


4,216 


3,516 


3,234 


2,894 


59 


507 




La Plata Sr 


993 


1,004 


1,002 


782 


585 


59 


211 






389 


431 


345 


414 


344 




20 






843 


962 


838 


728 


654 




177 






814 


1,018 


520 


540 


541 




99 




Malcolm Jr 


176 


243 


176 


176 


176 










589 


558 


635 


594 


594 








Dorchester 


3,005 


3,531 


3,290 


2,529 


2,251 


87 


426 






775 


824 


912 


574 


478 


59 


219 




981 


1,281 


1,076 


854 


787 




133 






543 


580 


594 


425 


364 


ie 


74 




South Dorchester Sr.. Jr.. . 


223 


233 


230 


198 


144 


12 








409 


475 


409 


409 


409 








Hurlock Elem. II (7th) 


51 


92 


46 


46 


46 








Vienna II (7th) 


23 


46 


23 


23 


23 








Frederick 


7,552 


8,223 


7,504 


6,400 


5,308 


440 


770 


155 




1,747 


1,942 


1,798 


1,304 


658 


183 


247 


53 




559 


626 


569 


513 


398 




90 






223 


224 


223 


228 


206 




35 






740 


883 


758 


604 


519 


"'29 


90 






838 


873 


832 


748 


596 


54 


"46 


102 




762 


777 


684 


628 


546 


57 






771 


811 


761 


600 


537 




150 







519 


559 


504 


504 


504 


"32 


112 




West Frederick Jr 


1,393 


1,528 


1,375 


1,271 


1,344 


85 








2,206 


2,737 


2,357 


1,810 


1,691 




433 






830 


880 


881 


705 


665 




153 




Southern Garrett Sr. Jr 


1,251 


1,618 


1,344 


973 


901 




280 





Maryland State Department of Education 295 



Each Maryland Public High School: Fall of 1964 



Other 
Foreign 
Lan- 
guages 


Agri- 
culture 


Industrial Education 


Home 
Eco- 
noinics 


Business 
Education 


X nysical 
and 
Health 
£jduc3ition 


Music 


j^jI 

Arts 
and 

Crafts 


Driver 
Education 


Special 
Education 


Arts 


Vocstionsl 
Technical 


1 




383 




383 




1,248 


1,092 


1,313 




22 






414 




424 




1,353 


1,585 


1,063 




28 






458 




442 




1 361 


1 544 


1 309 




25 






547 




553 




1 '593 


1 524 


1 422 




25 


t23 




483 




441 




1 443 


1 306 


1 194 




14 






474 




433 




1 361 


1 405 


1 237 




18 






739 




757 




1 688 


1 *505 


1 '307 










345 




372 




1 067 


1 '065 


'962 






*72 




468 




453 




1 449 


1 480 


1 175 








70 


424 


12 


613 


976 


1,564 


1,263 


794 


30 








94 


12 


92 


600 


411 


144 


68 








70 


128 




308 


376 


573 


439 


163 


36 








202 




213 




406 


468 


388 


















174 


212 


175 








169 


737 




639 


1 394 
'48O 


1 908 


2 019 


1 090 


331 






48 


59 




83 


'279 


'143 


158 


71 






71 


177 




87 


629 


322 


318 




161 






50 


190 




178 


285 


462 


711 


327 


99 








70 




83 




160 


181 


155 










79 




72 




387 


167 


152 










78 




68 




146 


171 


146 










53 




38 




91 


147 


91 










31 




30 




61 


181 


61 








252 


1,641 


95 


1 649 


2 995 


5 055 


4 313 


1 157 




176 




66 


64 




'l36 


'436 


'533 


461 










48 






174 


459 


317 


418 












218 


"95 


104 


856 


649 


271 


92 








78 


201 




258 


510 


765 


438 


193 




17 






59 




59 


45 


183 


203 










' 60 


219 




157 


425 


626 


341 


"88 










172 




136 


264 


469 


589 


48 














50 




102 


211 


52 


















102 


127 
















67 




132 


172 












578 




508 




1 177 


1 082 


684 




159 




153 


1 222 


54 


918 


2,386 


3,662 


1,200 


769 


455 


277 






'220 


39 


75 


820 


345 


90 


72 


245 


30 




102 


129 




119 


329 


460 


147 


145 


31 


68 






200 


is 


1 fiO 


4<:0 


001 


171 


145 


117 


69 






235 




182 


333 


500 


159 


83 


28 


68 




51 


208 




165 


•1/ 


723 


293 


162 


34 


12 






230 




208 




1 003 


340 


162 




30 




255 


812 


65 


969 


1 620 


2 812 


2 302 


539 


93 


137 




97 


149 


30 


193 


'750 


'568 


'502 


108 








76 


70 




85 


48 


334 


243 




"si 








102 




149 


010 


lyi 


262 


93 


21 


14 




82 


259 




162 


276 


568 


437 


208 


41 


123 






98 




78 




240 


164 












134 








R1 1 

oil 


RQA 


130 








120 


693 




850 


1 278 


2 617 


1 895 


1 304 




14 






138 




147 


640 


736 


312 


'255 




14 




86 


237 




231 


186 


770 


500 


166 








34 


216 




212 


344 


0/0 


382 


310 










102 




51 


108 


207 


29 


95 














209 




411 


451 


409 


















AR 


llO 


10 


















AO 


AR 
10 


23 






21 


387 


2,103 




1,950 


3,756 


7,525 


5,263 


3,023 


489 


59 


t21 


68 


467 




315 


1,654 


1,027 


302 


329 


215 




i :::: 




69 




75 


432 


429 


283 


89 










130 




96 




449 


324 


153 


"32 






154 


272 




283 


414 


1,711 

689 


470 


406 


116 


15 




70 


156 




128 


406 


676 


319 








51 


268 




250 


400 


631 


656 


372 








44 


116 




183 


450 


694 


616 


205 


126 


"ii 






184 




176 




519 


761 


463 




15 






441 




444 




1,376 


1,175 


687 




18 




228 


579 




591 


1,033 


1 ,426 


1,255 


633 


338 






120 


271 




234 


372 


584 


561 


249 


122 






108 


308 




357 


661 


763 


694 


252 


216 





296 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIX — Continued — Enrollment by Subject. Including Duplicatefja 



Local Unit 
Name of High School 



Bloomington Jr 

Kitzmiller Jr 

Route 40 Jr 

Harford 

Bel Air Sr 

Aberdeen Sr.-Jr 

Central Consolidated Sr.-Jr. . . 

Edgewood Sr.-Jr 

Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr 

Havre de Grace Consld. Sr.-Jr, 

North Harford Sr.-Jr 

Bel Air Jr 

Deerfield Elem. (7th) 

Howard 

Howard County Sr 

Glenelg Sr.-Jr 

Harriet Tubman Sr.-Jr 

Clarksville Jr 

Ellicott City Jr 

Rockland Jr 

Waterloo Jr 

Kent 

Chestertown Sr.-Jr 

Galena Sr.-Jr 

Garnett Sr.-Jr 

Rock Hall Sr.-Jr 

Montgomery 

Albert Einstein Sr 

Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr. . . . 

Gaithersburg, Sr 

Montgomery Blair Sr 

Northwood Sr 

Richard Montgomery Sr 

Springbrook Sr 

Walt Whitman Sr 

Walter Johnson Sr 

Wheaton Sr 

Damascus Sr.-Jr 

John F. Kennedy Sr.-Jr 

Poolesville Sr.-Jr 

Potomac Sr.-Jr 

Robert E. Peary Sr.-Jr 

Rock Terrace Sr.-Jr 

Sherwood Sr.-Jr 

Col. Joseph Belt Jr 

Eastern Jr 

Edwin W. Broome Jr 

Gaithersburg Jr 

Julius West Jr 

Kensington Jr 

Leland Jr 

Montgomery Hills Jr 

Newport Jr 

North Bethesda Jr 

Parkland Jr 

Randolph Jr 

Sligo Jr 

Takoma Park Jr 

Thomas W. Pyle Jr 

Western Jr 

White Oak Jr 

Prince George's 

Bladensburg Sr 

Central Sr 

DuVal Sr 

High Point Sr 

Laurel Sr 

Northwestern Sr 

Oxon HiU Sr 

Suitland Sr 

Surrattsville Sr 

Crossland Sr.-Jr 



iotal 




oocial 




Mathe- 




Jlinroli- 


English 


Studies 


• 

bcience 


matics 


Latm 


ment 










25 


25 


25 


25 


25 






1 no 


01 


51 

01 


01 




49 


112 


56 


56 


4Q 

4y 




C OUti 
o ,\}0O 




y ,uu/ 


7 RR7 
/ ,00/ 


/ ,UDO 


010 


1 ,812 


1 QOR 

1 ,yyD 


1 ,794 


1 41 n 
1 ,41U 


1 911 

1 ,Zoo 


100 


I fOO-± 


OQQ 


1 01 

1 ,yi^ 


1 R1 Q 
1 ,018 


1 ,404 


107 




15 


004 
ZZi 


Old 

Zoa 


oil 

Zol 




1,279 


1,514 


1,341 


1,126 


923 


'i4i 


1,094 


1,123 


1,119 


857 


860 


55 


214 


OKO 


1 QQ 

lyy 


1 R4 
104 


lOU 




1, 156 


1 ,298 


1, 144 


OKO 


040 

y4z 


70 

/y 


QSQ 

yoy 


QOA 


004 

yzi 


004 

yzi 


yoo 




004 


OOU 


oOu 


381 


15R 
OOD 




4,665 


5,967 


4,708 


4,183 


3,498 


138 


1 ,ol8 


1 \R0 


1 454 


936 


770 


72 


1 0A7 
1 fZil 


051 

yoi 


Oft"? 

yso 


000 


66 


170 


QQO 

ooU 


117 
OOi 


004 

^y4 


1QQ 

lyy 




388 


433 


17K 

0/0 


174 
0/4 


171 
0/0 






1 lie 


QOQ 


800 


897 
oZI 




178 


AiK 
440 


1 70 


170 

1/y 


170 

1/y 




DXo 


CIO 
ooZ 


084 


184 
084 


004 




1 ,514 

000 


1 ROQ 

1 ,oyy 


1 474 
i ,4/ 4 


1 007 
1 ,Zol 


1 1 1R 
1 ,110 


122 


Oo/ 


R07 

oy/ 


OOZ 


OZo 


116 


240 


281 


00 1; 
zzo 


1 77 
III 


149 
14^ 





386 


365 


1K0 
OOZ 


101 

oZo 


075 
ZIO 




000 


ORR 

Zoo 


onn 
zw 


Old 
^00 


171 
1/1 




43 ,64/ 


52 ,010 


39 ,421 


11 141 
00 ,041 


15 1 01 
00 ,180 


1 999 




1 RflQ 


999 


978 


814 


' 74 


1 ,yoo 


OA'i 
Z ,Z-lo 


1 ,0^8 


1 "iid 

1 ,000 


1 209 


168 


1 OR1 
I ,UDl 


1 ,183 


(Oy 


710 
/08 


445 


81 


2 ,557 


2 ,942 


ni 1 

z ,U10 


1 ono 
1 ,yu8 


1 470 
1 ,4/0 


104 


nn 1 


00 1 

z ,z\n 


1 fiCI 
1 ,081 


1 410 


1 240 


80 


1 ,943 


2 ,141 


1 i;co 
1 ,08^ 


1 110 
1 ,01^ 


935 


131 


1 ,457 


1 ,765 


1 non 
1 ,uyu 


1 no7 
1 ,U8/ 


005 
\)Z0 


110 


1 RQO 


1 ,889 


1 047 


1 0R7 
1 ,ZOI 


1 299 


148 


2 ,160 


2 ,715 


1 7i;i 
1 , /Oo 


1 R01 
1 ,OZl 


1 330 


104 


2 ,200 


2 ,486 


1 ,0/0 


1 1R1 
1 ,001 


1 0R1 
1 ,^D0 


92 


7/17 


968 


710 
/ oZ 


505 

oyo 


fil 4 
014 




797 


1 ,046 


0R1 

yoo 


cm 

OlO 


800 
000 


32 


Old 


KQO 
OoZ 


441 
441 


0^0 


345 


20 


851 


874 


777 
III 


7 no 
/i/y 


OOl 


35 


1 ,310 


1 ,478 


1 non 
1 ,uyu 


000 
800 


Qfi9 

yo^ 


136 


141 


" " • " 










1 ,366 


1 ,521 


1 oos 
1 ,zzo 


ono 

OUo 


991 


68 


1 ,446 


1 ,583 


1 4K7 

1 ,40/ 


1 1 Kn 
1 ,10U 


I ,404 


46 


1 ,237 


1 ,205 


1 ,450 


1 ,188 


1 105 
1 ,0^0 


48 

40 


1,345 


1,501 


1,222 


1,146 


1,222 


47 


1,221 


1,172 


1,152 


648 


1,126 


48 


855 


1 ,481 


1 ,039 


511 


1 noi 
1 ,uoo 


25 


1,229 


1 ,724 


1 ,232 


1 ,227 


1 010 
1 ,ZoZ 


00 


917 


1 ,185 


916 


764 


017 

yii 


30 


1 ,070 


1 ,643 


1 ,068 


1 ,028 


1 nR7 

1 ,UD/ 


33 


1 ,163 


1 ,207 


1 ,141 


QRO 

yo8 


1 135 


24 


1 ,469 


1 ,555 


1 ,469 


721 


1 ,474 


48 
40 


871 


956 


873 


874 


075 
o/O 




739 


798 


971 


463 


70R 
iZO 




1 ,413 


2,415 


1 ,423 


1 ,331 


1 ,412 


47 
4/ 


941 


1 ,385 


942 


903 


940 


40 
4o 


1,220 


1,345 


1,214 


1,060 


1,218 


48 


1,047 


1,224 


1,049 


856 


1,051 


54 


1,339 


1,945 


1,348 


1,333 


1,345 


34 


42,713 


47,963 


42,391 


35,880 


32,411 


921 


2,138 
988 


2,506 


1,857 


1,097 


912 


79 


1,090 


879 


663 


430 


38 


2,585 


3,181 


2,567 


1,760 


1,372 


148 


2,430 


2,800 


2,385 


1,517 


1,254 


119 


545 


612 


597 


394 


261 




2,709 


3,044 


2,661 


1,680 


1,306 


'ieo 


1,741 


2,210 


1,400 


1,099 


978 


110 


1,730 


1,983 


2,259 


1,095 


644 


122 


1,146 


1,474 


1,531 


696 


635 


72 


1,511 


1,827 


1,246 


1,349 


939 


73 



French 



1,481 
434 
473 

24 
224 
166 

50 
110 



1,077 

201 
122 

27 
185 
261 

92 
189 

223 
122 
32 
44 
25 

16,559 

348 
756 
220 
602 
666 
489 
515 
828 
670 
461 
290 
355 
116 
490 
310 

■463 
596 
455 
609 
280 
345 
913 
516 
496 
448 
858 
305 
233 
610 
337 
851 
569 
619 

3,823 
274 
94 
444 
469 
169 
455 
402 
302 
218 
268 



Maryland State Department of Education 297 



£ach Maryland Public High School: Fall of 1964 



Other 
Foreign 
Lan- 
guages 


Agri- 

/titltiirp 


Industrial 


Education 


Home 
Eco- 
nomics 


Husincss 
fiducstion 


Physicsl 

Health 
Education 


Nlosic 


Art 

Arts 

Crafts 


Driver 
Education 


Special 
£)ciucation 


Arts 


Vocational 
Technical 














25 




25 






















51 


















54 




56 








161 


2 384 


54 


2 019 


4 492 


5 869 


4 754 


3 715 


700 


207 




63 


428 




'315 


1 '510 


'717 


'360 


'333 


108 


27 






447 




420 


'952 


1 ,349 


841 


639 


308 








64 




82 


65 


'330 


133 


473 


36 








396 




283 


678 


633 


513 


106 


84 








271 


"54 


235 


587 


725 


548 


559 


71 


17 






56 




73 


140 


154 


97 


118 


24 


20 




98 


210 




160 


560 


639 


613 


163 


69 


94 






512 




451 




958 


1 069 


959 




35 














364 


'58O 


365 




14 




23 


1,874 


33 


1,210 


2,093 


3,114 


2,337 


1,670 




455 






515 




261 


1,169 


484 


264 


141 








23 


493 




254 


783 


452 


355 


184 




32 






115 


33 


107 


141 


283 


308 






90 






158 




124 




383 


488 


389 




60 






260 




283 




847 


373 


340 




105 














82 


179 












333 




jgi 




583 


370 


616 




168 




105 


472 




457 


812 


1 ,211 


1 351 


148 


157 


294 




84 


190 




158 


311 


'420 


'300 




33 


65 






97 




78 


216 


238 


235 


35 


37 


16 




21 


87 




153 


153 


330 


620 


113 


50 


140 






98 




68 


132 


223 


196 




37 


73 


592 


380 


11 706 


2,197 


7,350 


11 547 


35 653 


14 749 


9 694 


3 380 


890 


*69 




339 


'l82 


90 


'857 


'goo 


285 


134 


391 




•79 




422 


80 


133 


771 


1 ,570 


584 


384 


120 






95 


223 


178 


73 


943 


'612 


279 


127 


230 


13, 


♦ioo 




680 


1284 


331 


1 ,529 


1 070 


469 


492 


397 




♦52 




650 


79 


121 


1 |ll6 


1 '131 


497 


382 


551 








387 


J266 


222 


l|659 


1 '029 


394 


236 


232 








384 


^52 


138 


'744 


'904 


377 


252 


99 




*57 




358 


J105 


121 


460 


1 042 


497 


274 


77 




*124 




635 


17 


312 


528 


1 ^458 


640 


507 


235 




*60 


iso 


568 


J630 


259 


1 401 


1 240 


481 


279 


511 


1$ 


*51 


87 


221 


24 


152 


'263 


'520 


344 


241 


149 


14 






192 




196 


93 


789 


264 


224 








48 


133 




92 


225 


439 


120 


127 


55 


42 






331 




185 




850 


669 


322 










329 


129 


195 


595 


753 


277 


227 


225 








151 


60 


46 




221 


42 






48S 






282 


111 


178 


363 


1 133 


418 


250 


108 


72 






401 




313 




1 408 


445 


314 










383 




284 




1 '310 


587 


457 




20 






379 




273 




li224 


700 


413 




7& 






341 




297 




1,239 


357 


244 




6& 






215 




232 




1 099 


379 


208 










366 




275 




1 '224 


412 


258 










188 




186 




872 


832 


369 










249 




269 




1 046 


340 


231 










289 




230 




1 154 


361 


231 










334 




299 




1 464 


480 


349 










217 




209 




1 '125 


501 


350 










263 




213 




'931 


424 


304 




1ft. 






511 




356 




1 400 


464 


345 










244 




259 




910 


394 


250 










342 




324 




1,206 


421 


230 










294 




206 




1,041 


549 


373 










405 




281 




1,339 


466 


310 






583 


546 


13 ,887 


700 


12,692 


17,199 


34,499 


17,062 


12,916 


1,782 


590 


82 




408 


364 


368 


1,976 


1,204 


263 


301 


192 








237 


35 


129 


1,101 


724 


153 


125 


82 




♦128 




379 




425 


2,063 


1,473 


579 


384 


93 




*t276 




552 




406 


2,167 


1,465 


489 


345 


180 








88 




102 


484 


365 


58 


74 


32 




♦77 




577 




437 


2,223 


1,400 


536 


450 


212 








384 




247 


1,622 


1,076 


433 


226 


72 




't26 




304 




190 


1,823 


887 


330 


219 


336 








248 




130 


855 


561 


56 


160 


120 


■'96 






335 




271 


953 


1,167 


307 


274 


293 





298 Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIX — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicate 



1 

1 

Total ! 
Enroll- ' 
ment 

j 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 


French 


1,451 


1,441 


1,465 


965 


950 




179 


1,120 


1,146 


1,190 


957 


850 






759 


791 


668 


641 


524 






769 


816 


765 


632 


499 




'98 


932 


1,066 


1,026 


1,029 


937 




41 


942 i 


1,014 


927 


933 


927 




23 


888 1 


947 


888 


887 


885 




34 


1,211 


1,324 


1,206 


1,613 


1,224 




64 


878 


947 


874 


876 


887 




36 


784 


782 


777 


782 


779 




10 


688 


756 


666 


666 


666 




27 


1,205 


1,403 


1,193 


1,193 


1,193 




21 


795 


917 


799 


795 


795 






843 


883 


817 


818 


819 




"2! 


711 


758 


711 


711 


712 






979 


1,057 


967 


966 


969 




"46 


880 


974 


880 


880 


880 






680 


788 


667 


667 


667 




"23 


956 


1 ,036 


927 


927 


933 






881 


950 


851 


851 


849 






779 


938 


777 


777 


764 






647 


627 


616 


616 


621 




"19 


698 


794 


698 


698 


698 




25 


574 


612 


553 


552 


553 






1 ,143 


1 ,205 


1 ,140 


1 ,137 


1 ,143 




28 


615 


718 


618 


617 


618 




14 


950 


992 


940 


940 


935 






750 


778 


727 


728 


727 






682 


776 


676 


676 


676 




"ig 


1,834 


2,076 


1,731 


1,582 


1,339 




271 


589 


798 


552 


475 


455 




86 


524 


551 


507 


461 


411 




76 


386 


384 


376 


373 


281 




63 


335 


343 


296 


273 


192 




46 


3,044 


3,163 


3,094 


2,522 


2,225 


48 


330 


466 


461 


451 


367 


290 




37 


327 


333 


327 


279 


282 




46 


712 


798 


752 


582 


455 


"48 


124 


572 


634 


604 


444 


414 




123 


481 


473 


497 


384 


323 






486 


464 


463 


466 


461 






2,029 


2,109 


2,201 


1,^44 


1,673 




638 


458 


500 


576 


455 


427 




224 


114 


114 


144 


82 


110 






132 


137 


130 


112 


106 




"ie 


604 


607 


569 


553 


483 




224 


438 


442 


489 


380 


295 




140 


256 


255 


266 


235 


225 




34 


27 


54 


27 


27 


27 






1,973 


2,325 


1,971 


1,730 


1,605 


73 


322 


1,025 


1,176 


1,023 


880 


810 


73 


156 


523 


724 


525 


507 


497 




66 


425 


425 


423 


343 


298 




100 


9,845 


10,759 


9,569 


7,860 
864 


6,993 


745 


732 


816 


851 


893 


482 


120 


103 


321 


335 


361 


252 


282 




48 


2,245 


2,693 


1,983 


1,381 


1,346 


236 


293 


1,916 


2,068 


2,119 


1,340 


1,085 


211 


170 


520 


583 


555 


377 


322 


62 


32 


629 


890 


619 


548 


442 


59 


37 


644 


484 


462 


488 


398 


57 


49 


429 


395 


395 


395 


395 






171 


376 


171 


172 


208 






759 


724 


724 


724 


724 






801 


757 


757 


755 


757 






594 


603 


530 


564 


552 






5,017 


6,424 


4,883 


4,179 


3,690 


223 


971 


'983 


1 ',246 


1,164 


588 


476 


49 


120 


1,020 


1 ,274 


963 


900 


800 


100 


245 


333 


505 


385 


; 282 


221 




106 


278 


325 


1 316 


221 


212 




; 112 


1,185 


1 ,740 


! 923 


991 


808 




234 


1,218 


! 1 ,334 


, 1,132 


1,197 


1,173 


"74 


1 154 


2,704 


2,765 


2,774 


2,383 

1 399 


2,100 




888 


428 


450 


443 


380 




183 


441 


474 


1 475 


1 385 


344 




167 


758 


1 770 


776 


I 645 


576 




298 


1,077 


1 1,071 


1 1 ,080 


1 954 


800 




240 



Local Unit 
Name of High School 



Fairmont Heights Sr.-Jr.. 
Frederick Douglass Sr.-Jr. 
Frederick Sasscer Sr.-Jr. . . 

Gwynn Park Sr.-Jr 

Belair Jr 

Beltsville Jr 

Benjamin Stoddert Jr. . . . 

Bladensburg Jr 

Buck Lodge Jr 

Charles Carroll Jr 

Eugene Burroughs Jr 

Francis Scott Key Jr 

Glenridge Jr 

Greenhelt Jr 

Hyattsville Jr 

John Hanson Jr 

Kent Jr 

Laurel Jr 

Maryland Park Jr 

Mary M. Bethune Jr 

Mt. Rainier Jr 

Nicholas Orem Jr 

Oxon Hill Jr 

Robert Goddard Jr 

Roger B. Taney Jr 

Rollingcrest Jr 

Suitland Jr 

Surrattsville Jr 

William Wirt Jr 



Queen Anne's 

Centerville Sr.-Jr. . 
Kennard Sr.-Jr. . . . 
Stevensville Sr.-Jr. 
Sudlersville Sr.-Jr.. 



St. Mary's 

Banneker Sr.-Jr 

Carver Sr.-Jr 

Great Mills Sr.-Jr 

Leonardtown Sr.-Jr. . . 
Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr. 
Esperanza Jr 



Somerset 

Crisfield Sr. Jr. . . . 
Deal Island Sr.-Jr. . 

Marion Sr.-Jr 

Somerset Sr.-Jr. . . . 
Washington Sr.-Jr. 

Woodson Sr.-Jr 

Ewell Jr 



Talbot 

Easton Sr.-Jr 

Moton Sr.-Jr 

St. Michaels Sr.-Jr. 



Washlngton 

Boonsboro Sr 

Hancock Sr 

.N orth Hagerstown Sr. 
South Hagerstown Sr. 
Clear Spring Sr.-Jr.. . . 

Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 

Williamsport Sr.-Jr. . . 

Boonsboro Jr 

Hancock Int. Jr 

North Potomac Jr. . . . 
South Potomac Jr. . . . 
Washington Jr 



WlCCMICO 

Wicomico Sr 

James M. Bennett Sr.-Jr. 

Mardela Sr.-Jr 

Pittsville Sr.-Jr 

Salisbury Sr.-Jr 

Wicomico Jr 



Worcester 

Pocomoke Sr.-Jr 

Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 

Stephen Decatur Sr.-Jr. 
Worcester Sr.-Jr 



Maryland State Department of Education 299 



^ Each Maryland Public High School: Fall of 1964 



Other 

Lan- 
guages 


Agri- 
culture 


Industrial 


Education 


Home 


Business 
Education 


Physical 
and 
Health 
Education 


Music 


Art- 
Arts 
and 

Crafts 


Driver 
Education 


Special 
Education 


Arts 


Vocationa 

and 
Technical 


I Eco- 
nomics 






128 


301 


254 


722 


951 


157 


184 


57 


5 




i62 


272 




395 


278 


944 


372 


254 


47 


28 




93 


217 




215 


495 


658 


?76 


195 


30 


24 




241 


203 




204 


437 


596 


272 


267 


36 








495 




536 




947 


513 


367 










442 




467 




917 


522 


416 




15 






388 




385 




883 


431 


322 










508 




520 




1,049 


760 


545 










440 




410 




880 


496 


344 










407 




343 




765 


456 


323 










298 




271 




681 


345 


318 




22 






576 




484 




1,195 


628 


451 




12 






344 




330 




694 


346 


321 










395 




401 




1,112 


450 


308 




i38 






277 




271 




715 


438 


358 










474 




410 




956 


718 


351 




6 






437 




435 




871 


357 


358 










335 




294 




667 


676 


546 




13 






461 




401 




1,091 


556 


336 




29 






443 




408 




842 


486 


365 




30 






375 




332 




713 


332 


346 










281 




241 




700 


450 


266 




87 




50 


288 




267 




697 


439 


335 










266 




217 




545 


352 


360 




22 






506 




448 




1,161 


523 


435 










291 




241 




618 


437 


308 










402 




384 




933 


908 


796 




i(> 






160 




154 




713 


671 


303 




25 






266 




269 




683 


491 


280 




2S 




332 


309 




455 


698 


1,576 


1,048 


101 


351 






90 


150 




181 


265 


469 


295 




160 






52 


123 




153 


120 


516 


135 




83 








36 




70 


113 


333 


100 


37 


58 






190 






51 


200 


258 


518 


64 


50 






94 


1,133 




938 


1,385 


2,801 


1,883 


1,582 


283 


143 




46 


209 




155 


124 


462 


283 


249 


102 


2a 






124 




123 


94 


350 


314 


217 


56 


19 






72 




65 


577 


449 


118 


121 


42 








155 




133 


340 


337 


277 


177 


35 






48 


140 




155 


250 


498 


339 


298 


48 


2C> 






433 




307 




705 


552 


520 




84 




140 


349 




512 


1 ,071 


1,830 


1,164 


215 










107 




140 


291 


353 


270 


















94 


99 




' '40 
















102 


131 


30 


24 




.... 




63 


ii3 




i2i 


231 


560 


377 










77 






135 


260 


409 


360 


i5i 










i29 




116 


93 


251 
27 


127 










107 


359 




353 


838 


1,406 


844 




110 






58 


164 




154 


506 


690 


347 




90 






49 


114 




137 


78 


330 


236 




20 








81 




62 


254 


386 


261 








45 


355 


3,263 


301 


3,092 


3,849 


8,413 


5,292 


3,788 


339 


535^ 




84 


189 




186 


389 


554 


190 


81 


48 


9a 






103 




96 


168 


350 


145 


77 






*26 




622 


i99 


533 


886 


964 


483 


206 


"96 




*19 


69 


407 


J102 


420 


1 ,546 


941 


333 


219 


96 


66 






120 




114 


290 


516 


267 


230 


24 


17 




li2 


224 




137 


220 


425 


448 




27 






90 


202 




204 


350 


668 


336 


260 


48 


55 






192 




230 




1 ,156 


493 


428 




188 






142 




80 




347 


197 


173 










378 




381 




1,100 


876 


759 




35 






400 




401 




797 


801 


801 




44 






284 




310 




595 


723 


554 




40 




146 


1,489 


306 


1,357 


2,455 


4,237 


2,802 


2,078 


748 


73 




42 


247 


62 


175 


1 ,114 


494 


287 


139 


268 


12 






250 


t238 


265 


579 


861 


498 


358 


277 


15 




"38 


168 




149 


201 


336 


200 


201 










129 




104 


129 


378 


215 


225 








"so 


323 


"'6 


305 


401 


979 


795 


554 


203 


32 




16 


372 




359 


31 


1,189 


807 


601 




14 




127 


658 




682 


1,172 


2,126 


1,818 


620 


120 


330 






94 




75 


177 


319 


294 


123 


66 






"25 


137 




150 


231 


336 


291 


147 


20 






37 


233 




196 


450 


654 


351 


133 








65 ' 


194 




261 ' 


314 


817 1 


882 1 


217 


"34 1 


■336 



300 



Ninety-Ninth Annual Report 



* Includes the following number taking German: Anne Arundel: Andover Sr.-Jr.— 115, Brooklyn Park Sr.-Jr. — 53; Baltimore City: 
City College— 243, Eastern— 111, Edmondson— 28, Forest Park— 80, Patterson— 53, Polytechnic— 263, Western— 162, Junior Highs— 
856; Baltimore: Milford Mill Sr. — 101, Woodlawn Sr. — 84, Johnnycake Jr. — 35, Woodlawn Jr.— 72; Montgomery: Albert Einstein 
Sr.— 69. Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr.— 79, Montgomery Blair Sr.— 100, North wood Sr.— 52, Walt Whitman Sr.— 57, Walter Johnson Sr. 
—124, Wheaton Sr.— 60, Damascus Sr.— 51; Prince George's: DuVal Sr.— 128, High Point Sr.— 253, Northwestern Sr.— 77; Wash- 
ington: North Hagerstown Sr. — 26, South Hagerstown Sr. — 19. 

t Includes the following number taking Russian: Baltimore: Dulaney Sr.— 35, Parkville Sr. — 25, Towson Sr. — 41, Ridgely Jr. — 
23; Frederick: Frederick Sr.— 21; Prince George's: High Point Sr.— 23, Suitland Sr.— 20. 

X Includes the following number taking Technical Education: Baltimore City: Carver— 69, Mergenthaler — 243; Montgomery: 
Montgomery Blair Sr.— 61, Richard Montgomery Sr. — 21, Springbrook Sr. — 22, Walt Whitman Sr. — 31, ^Wheaton Sr. — 60; Wash- 
ington: South Hagerstown Sr.— 17; Wicomico: James M. Bennett Sr.-Jr.- 30. 



Index 



301 



INDEX 



A 



Academic course, each high school, 284-291 
Accreditation and Certification, division of, 

58-64 
Administration 

Cost per pupil, 204 

Expenditures, 272-273, 279 

Per cent for, 198-201 

Superintendents, 2, 7-22, 248 
Administration and finance, division of, 74-77 
Adult Education 

Expenditures, 225, 227, 244, 274 

General. 228-229 

Vocational, 230-233 
Agriculture 

Adult Education, 225, 230-233 

Enrollment, 135, 146 

Each high school, 292-299 

Federal aid, 225-226, 234 

School offering, 160, 292-299 

Teachers, 160 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds (see 

State aid and Federal aid) 
Aid per classroom, 244, 262 
Aid per pupil, 244, 262 
Appropriations 

Local, 195-197, 220, 264 

State, 195-197, 244, 262, 264 

Federal, 195-197, 244, 263, 264 
Area Redevelopment Act, 224, 244, 263 
Art 

Enrollment, 135, 158 

Each high school, 292-299 

Schools offering, 160, 292-299 

Teachers, 160 
Assessable basis, 218, 221-223 
Attendance 

Average daily, 247 

Per cent of, 247 

Teachers at summer school and work- 
shops, 169 
Workers (see Pupil personnel) 

B 

Bands, orchestras, chorus, 156-157 

Belonging, average number, 247 
Per teacher and principal, 161 

Births, resident, 100 

Board of Education, State, 2 

Bonded indebtedness, 218-219 

Books and instructional materials, 274-275 

Boys and girls 

Each high school, 284-291 
Graduates, high school, 116-134 
Nonpromotions in first grade, 115 
Number of different pupils, 246 

Budget 

Appropriations, State Department of 
Education, 244 

Local appropriations, 220 
Buildings (see Capital outlay) 
Business education 

Adult, 228-229 

Enrollment. 135. 152-153. 228-229 

Each high school, 292-299 
Schools offering, 160, 292-299 
Teachers, 160 

c 



Capital outlay, school, 195, 216, 220, 272, 282 

By site, building, equipment, 282 
Certificate status, teachers, 174-176 
Chorus, bands, orchestras, 156-157 



C — (continued) 

Certification and accreditation, division of, 
58-64 

Civil Defense adult education, 224, 229, 263 

Clerks, 248-251 

Colleges 

Community and junior college enroll- 
ments, 235 

Graduates qualifying for teaching certifi- 
cates, 168 

High school graduates of 1963 entering, 

126-134 
State, 126-131 
Commercial course, each high school, 284-291 

(see also Business education) 
Community colleges. 198-199, 235, 262 
Community services, 198-199, 273, 281 
Contents, table of, 23 

Contracted services, expenditures, 274-286 
Cost per pupil. 202-203 

By function, 204 

Transported, 210 
Costs ( see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, supervisors, 
7-22 

Courses in individual high schools, 284-291 
Crippled children, services for, 101-109, 111 
Current expenses 

Amount and per cent by source, 195-197 

Cost per pupil, 202-203 

Per cent distribution by function, 198-201 

D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, 89 
Days in session, 89 
Debt services, 195, 218-220, 272, 283 
Departments of education. State and local, 
2-22 

Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 151, 225-226, 230-234 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 135, 159 

Each high school, 292-299 

Schools offering. 160 

State aid, 244, 262 

Teachers, 160 

E 

Elementary schools 

Disbursements for instruction, 275 

Instructional personnel. 250 

Number of. 91. 245 
Emergency certificates, 174-176 
Employment of high school graduates, 117- 

120. 123-125 
English, high school 

Enrollment, 135-137 

Each high school, 292-299 

Schools offering, 160, 292-299 

Teachers. 160 
Enrollment 

Adult. 228-232 

Campus schools. State colleges. 94, 96 
Elementary, 90-99, 246. 252-261 
Grade or year. 92, 94-99 
Handicapped children, 101-109, 111 
High school, 90-91, 246, 252-261 
Course, each school, 284-291 
Grade, 92, 94-99 

Each school. 284-291 
Subjects. 135-159 

Each school, 292-299 
Nonpublic, private and parochial, 90-91, 94, 
97-99, 252-261 



302 



Index 



E — (continued) 

Public, 90-95, 246 
Subject, 135-159 

Each school, 292-299 
Summary, 90-91, 94 

Equalization fund, 195-197, 244, 262 

Equivalence high school, 194 

Evening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 228-232 
Expenditures, 225-227, 274 

Expenditures 

(see also Administration, Capital outlay. 
Community colleges. Community services. 
Debt service. Fixed charges. Food serv- 
ices. Health services. Instruction, Main- 
tenance, Operation, Pupil personnel. Stu- 
dent body activities, Transportation) 
Adult education, 225, 227, 274 
Contracted services, 274-280 
Libraries, local, 240-241 
Other charges, 274-280 
Rehabilitation, 237, 242-244 
Salaries, 274-280 

Vocational, 225-226, 234 
School library books, 274-275 
Supplies and materials, 274-280 
Textbooks, 274-275 

Total, by major functions, 244, 272-273 
Vocational, Federal, 225-226, 234 
Experience of teachers, 177-188 

F 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 

Fall enrollment, 90, 92-99 

Federal aid 

Libraries, 240-241 
Schools, 195-197, 224, 263 
Vocational education, 224-226, 234 
Administration and supervision, 225-226 
Salaries of teachers, 225, 234 

Financial statements 

State department headquarters, 242-243 
State public schools, 244, 262-283 
Vocational Rehabilitation, 242-243 

First grade nonpromotions, 115 

Fixed charges. 198-201, 273, 279 

Follow-up of graduates, 117-134 

Food services, 198-199, 272-273, 280 

French, adult, 228 

French, high school 

Enrollment. 135. 144 

Each high school, 292-299 
Schools offering, 160, 292-299 
Teachers, 160 

G 

General course, each high school, 284-291 

German, 145 (see French for other references) 

Grade enrollment, 92, 94-99 

Graduates 

High school. 116-134 

Entering State colleges, 284-291 
From each school. 136-141 
Occupations. 117-119. 123-125 

Guidance, teachers of, 160, 248-251 

H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 102, 111, 244 
Home and hospital instruction, 101-102, 
108 

Opportunities for education of, 101-111 
Preschool, 111 



H — (continued) 

Receipts from State for, 102, 111, 244, 262 
Health education (see Physical and health 
education) 
Health services, 198-201, 204, 273, 276 
Hearing and speech therapy, 110 
High school equivalence, 194 
High schools 

Disbursements for instruction, 275 
Individual, 284-291 
Instructional personnel, 251 
Home economics 

Adult, 225, 230-234 
Enrollment, 135, 147 

Each high school, 292-299 
Federal aid, 225-226, 234 
Schools offering, 160, 292-299 
Teachers, 160 
Home and hospital instruction of pupils, 101- 
102, 108 

I 

Impacted areas, 263 

Incentive fund, school buildings. 244. 262 
Industrial education (see Trades & industries) 
Instruction 

Cost per pupil. 204 
Division of, 43-58 
Expenditures 

Contracted services, 274-275 
Salaries, 274-275 
Supplies and materials, 274-275 
Total, 272 
Per cent of current expenses, 198-201 

J 

Junior colleges, 235, 244, 262, 273, 281 

K 

Kindergartens 

Enrollment, public and nonpublic. 92, 

94-99 
Nonpublic. 252-261 

L 

Languages (see English. French, etc.) 

Latin. 144 (see French for other references) 

Legislation, 25-27 

Length of school session, 89 

Letter of transmittal, 24 

Levies, local, 220 

Librarians 

Public, 7 

School, 248-250 
Libraries, public 

Circulation and number of volumes, 
240-241 

Income and expenditures, 240-241, 244 

State aided, 7 
Libraries, school 

Expenditures for books, 274-275 
Library Extension, division of, 64-69 
Library service act, 224 
Local appropriations, 195-197, 220, 264 
Lunch program, school, 198-199, 212, 214-215, 
263, 272 

M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 204 

Expenditures, 273, 277 

Per cent of current expenses, 198-201 

Personnel, 248 



Index 



303 



M — (continued) 

Manpower Development Training Act, 224, 263 
Materials and supplies, expenditures, 274-280 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 135, 142-143 

Each high school, 292-299 

Schools offering, 160, 292-299 

Teachers, 160 
Medical examinations, bus drivers, 262 
Mentally handicapped children, 101-109, 111 
Milk program, special, 198-199, 213, 263, 272 
Minimum program. State 205-206 
Minutes, State Board, 28-42 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 135, 156-157 

Each high school, 292-299 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 156-157 

Schools offering, 292-299 

Teachers, 160 



N 



National Defense Education Act, 224, 244, 263 
Night schools (see Evening schools. Adult ed- 
ucation ) 
Nonpromotions 

Elementary, 114-115 

First grade, 115 

High school, 113 
Nonpublic schools, 90-91, 97-99, 252-261 
Number belonging, average, 247 

Per teacher, 161 
Number of different pupils, 91, 246 
Number of schools. 

Nonpublic, 90-91, 252-261 

One-teacher, 162-245 

Public, 90-91, 245 

Elementary, 90-91, 162, 166-167, 245 
High, 90-91, 166-167, 245 



o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 117-119, 
123-125 

Office and clerical staff, 248-251 
One-teacher schools 

Number belonging in, 162 

Number of, 162, 245 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 204 

Expenditures, 273, 277 

Per cent of current expenses, 198-201 

Personnel, 248 
Orchestras, bands, chorus, 156-157 
Other charges, expenditures, 274-280 



P 

Parochial and private schools (see Nonpublic 
schools ) 

Part-payment of salaries, 244, 262 
Payments to adjoining units, 272 
Pensions (see Retirement system for 
teachers) 

Physical and health education, high school 

Enrollment, 135, 154-155 

Each high school, 292-299 

Schools offering, 292-299 

Teachers, 160 
Physical examination, bus drivers, 262 
Physically handicapped children, 101-111 
Positions in local school systems, 248-251 
Preparation, teachers, 170-173 
Preschool handicapped. 111 
Principals and vice-principals, 249-251 



P — (continued) 

Private and parochial schools, 90-91, 97-99. 
252-261 

Professional and clerical staffs, county, 248- 

251 
Property 

Assessed valuation, 221-223 

School, 217 
Provisional certificates, 174-176 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel 

Cost per pupil, 204 

Local school systems, 7-22 

Number of positions. 248 

Per cent of current expenses. 198-201 

Salaries. 274 

Total expenditures, 273, 274 
Pupils 

Campus schools. State colleges, 96 
Nonpublic, 90-91, 97-99, 252-261 
One-teacher schools, 162 
Per teacher, 160 
Public school 

Enrollment, 90-95, 246 

Number attending, 247 

Number belonging, 247 

Per cent of attendance, 247 
Transported, 210 

R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 195-197, 264 
Federal. 195-197, 263, 264 

Adult education, 227 

Libraries, 224, 240-241 

Teachers salaries, 225-227 

Vocational education, 225-227 
Local, 195-197, 220, 264 
State 

Adult education, 227 

Libraries, 240-241, 244 

Schools, 195-197, 262, 264 
Rehabilitation, vocational 

(see Vocational rehabilitation ) 
Repair, utility men, janitors (see Operation 

personnel) 
Revenue and nonrevenue receipts, 264 
Research and development, division of, 78-82 
Resident births, 100 
Resignations, teachers, 189-191 
Retarded children, programs for, 101-111 
Retirement systems for teachers, 7, 244, 262 
Russian, 145 (see French for other refer- 
ences ) 

s 

Salaries 

Administration, 279 

Contracted services, 278 

Health services, 276 

Instruction, 274-275 

Maintenance and operation, 277 

Pupil personnel, 276 

Teachers, average, 207-209 

Vocational, 225-226 
School lunch, 198-199, 212, 214-215, 263. 272 
School milk, 198-199, 213, 263. 272 
Schools 

Number of, 90-91, 162. 166-167, 245, 
252-261 
Science, high school 

Enrollment. 135. 140-141 

Each high school, 292-299 
Schools offering, 160, 292-299 
Teachers, 160 
Secretaries and clerks, 248-251 
Session, length of, 89 



304 



Index 



S — (continued) 

Size of 

Schools 

Each high school, 284-291 
Elementary, 166-167 
High, 166-167 
Teaching staff, 90-91, 166-167. 249-251 
Social security, teachers, 262 
Social studies, high school 
Enrollment, 135, 138-139 

Each high school, 292-299 
Schools offering, 160, 292-299 
Teachers, 160 
Source of funds, current expenses, 195 
Spanish, 145 (see French for other refer- 
ences) 

Special classes for handicapped, 101-106, 111 
Special education enrollment, 135, 159 
Special milk program, 198-199, 213, 263, 272 
Speech and hearing therapy, 110 
State 

Aid to schools, 195-197 

Minimum program, 205-206 
Showing various funds, 244, 262 

Board of Education, 2 

Excerpts from minutes of, 28-42 

Colleges, 126-131 

Department of Education, 2-4, 242-244 
Teachers' retirement system, 7, 244, 262 
Student body activities. 198-199, 273. 280 
Subjects studied in high schools. 135-159 

Each high school, 292-299 
Summer school attendance, county teachers. 
169 

Superintendents. 2. 7-22, 248 
Supervisors 

Local school systems, 7-22 

Names of, 2-22 

Number of. 248-251 

State. 2-7 

Supplies and materials, expenditures, 274-280 

T 

Table of contents, 23 
Taxable basis, 221-223 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 198-199 
Teacher! s) 

Average salary, 207-209 

Certification, 58-64, 168, 174-176 

Experience, 177-188 

New, 172-173, 176, 183-188, 192-193 

Number of 
Public 

Elementary and high, 90-91, 163- 

165. 249-251 
For each high school subject, 160 
In each high school, 284-291 

Nonpublic, 90-91, 252-261 

Of handicapped children, 104-106, 110 

Preparation, 170-173 

Pupils per, 161 

Resignations, 189-191 

Salaries, average, 207-209 



T — (continued) 

Social security, 262 

Summary, elementary and high, public 

and nonpublic, 90-91 
Summer school and workshops, county 

teachers, 169 
Turnover of. 189-193 
Teachers' retirement system, 7, 244, 262 
Technical education, 225-226, 230-233 
Textbooks, expenditures, 274-275 
Therapy program, hearing and speech, 110 
Trades and industries (Industrial education) 
Adult. 225-226, 230-233 
Enrollment, 148-149 

Each high school, 292-299 
Federal aid. 224-226. 234 
Schools offering, 160, 292-299 
Teachers, 160 
Transportation of pupils 

Cost, total and per pupil, 204, 210, 273, 
278 

Number and per cent transported, 210 
Number of schools to which transporta- 
tion was provided, 211 
Number vehicles, 211 
Per cent of current expenses, 198-201 
Personnel, 248 
Turnover in teaching staff. 189-193 



V 

Value of 

Assessable property. 221-223 

School property. 217 
Vocational course, each high school, 284-291 
Vocational education 

Courses, adult, 233 

Division of, 69-74 

Enrollment, 

Adult education. 230-232 
Day schools. 135. 150-151 
Each high shool, 292-299 

Federal aid. 224-226, 227, 234, 244, 263 
Vocational rehabilitation 

Appropriations. 242-244 

Disability of clients, 238 

Division of, 83-87 

Referrals. 239 

Services rendered. 236-237 



w 

Wealth back of each pupil belonging, 223 

Wealth per capita, 223 

Withdrawals 

Pupils, 112 

Teachers, 189-191 
Workshops, county teachers, 169 



Y 

Year, length of school, 89 



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